Skip to main content

Full text of "Radio Mirror (Nov 1935-Apr 1936)"

See other formats


IIP 



ill! 



KID 



IIIPll 



n 



8BvU1 



Mi 

18 



n 



II 
t 



lilli 



m 



mm 



mu 



111 

m 






1 \m 



Hi 



HP 



111 
till 

111 



JffiL 



i 



mm 



m 

■ ■•...< 



HH 

ibsH 



Hnif 
nffltt 



1 



HlNflfi 






■II 



Btfu/J 

Bnnll 




Book. 



PRESENTED 1SY 



Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 




IO-VISU AL CONSERVATION 
at The LIBRARY of CONGRESS 




Packard Campus 
for Audio Visual Conservation 
www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 




NOVEMBER 




M I R FLO FL 



FRANCES 
LANGFORD 







)W HOLLYWOOD PUTS RADIO STARS ON THE SPOT/ 

ALSO 

GREAT RADIO FEATURE By FAITH BALDWIN 



$500.00 

CASH PRIZES 

in the big 
Jack Benny — 

Broadway Melody 
of 1936" Contest > 



wis 



Oenutne Diam 



onds ^Watches 



DOWN 







Only $2.88 a month 



^Both 
for 

$ 29 75 

a&. '^fSIoFSl 

Solid White oyl^nf engraved engage- 
The luxuriously hand eng™ spe cia Uy 
ment ring is set with a cerun nite 

selected d^ing^ *™^ ne Wedding 
diamond of ™f t x J 1 ™ u han< i engraved to 
ring Is exquisitely ha"u , c s yello w 
match. State choice °i white o^ n , y 
gold. Both complete it 
$2.88 a month. 



aJt ouk. 

' e */^L/ «POT CASH PRICES 

m ake direct mqumes. r _„ aRA NTEED 

all charses pre-paia. 



Just $2.35 a month 



K H-B ■ ■ ■ Elegantly stWeds q ^are e Prong 
milgrained and pierceu. v 





Only $1.8.8 a month 



handsome inl i al rl ng o uine 

Yellow Gold set witi ^ m GoU1 lnl - 
diamonds and ^ so lid w n gpe , y 



A'\ 



TEN DAYS FREE TRIAL 

You be -he sole iudge! If M^teU^on 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

Evm rin3 or watch is »Wj^h f^YA^ 
Sn sold b° nd sau 9 a U r a e ,a deaTin g Buy now to 
*"?d ° h e fa bis dn X m " U ^h! Order by m«l .he 
avoid the oih ,. A y E , 
Royal way ana »«"■■ 



Both 



Only* 
50 



I4K 



$^2 W ^^r^EL. 

10 Certified Genuine Diamonds 

KH 2 "Dawn ol Hw^^f^S 

Sa\ch b e r dg^uin%diamonds,n 2 the we^ ^ ^ mo 



Now Only 54 Q75 
2 DIAMOND BAGUETTE I U 

Only $1-88 a month 

KH 8 Elegantly styled ^j^tw 

S^aS^ffl^d^en^le 
$1.88 a month. 





SSSSS WRIST WATCH 
Only $2.88 a month 

^e. b S r n^ k 88 b a a n?'o e nth. 



$ 24 75 

sssr sr u^ — ^ 

KH-9 • ■ BULOVA'S most^popular Baguette 
ft Bulova's lowest price- Da ntuy moveroent 

S^Se^rtce^'on.v S2.3T a mo. 



g 0> • 



<&■' 



i9 75 

Complete ■ w 
17 Jewel WALTH AM Outfit 

Only $188 a month 

S« ; to C °rt 1 c e n e A W .^or eD , K l 9 .75-On ly 
J1.88 a month. 



^ RULOVASENATOR-lSlewels 
TheBULOVA » of 



24 7 




. .Th" aristocrat^ 9«£U& 
Only S2-38 a month. 



Hundreds of.specia. ^MSffiMg 
quality g^^'^ew^ry silverware cameras 
ard watches, fine leweiiy. e3Ul jf U l styles— 

1 ■•"- aitiiia 



DlflmonD SvWflTCH co.j. 

Established 1895 



-Dept. 51 



"^y 



zy 







WHY wear yourself out with a WORN-OUT stove 
when you can have a new KALAMAZOO for . . . 



TNI 

10' ri*i door FRANKLIN nV* r«i pot 



18c a day at the FACTORY PRICE! 



Mail Coupon now 

for NEW FREE CATALOG 

Your name and address on the coupon brings 
FREE to you the greatest Kalamazoo Stove, 
Range and Furnace catalog of all time. 
It displays over 200 styles and sizes — many 
in full color — more bargains than in 20 big 
stores — new stoves — new ideas — new color 
combinations — new features. It quotes rock- 
bottom, direct- to-you FACTORY PRICES. 



Now the Stove of Your Dreams for 
As Little As 18c a Day 

Easy credit — Easy terms. Kalamazoo qual- 
ity— FACTORY PRICES. 200 styles and 
sizes to choose from. Learn how more than 
950,000 satisfied customers have saved 
money by dealing with "A Kalamazoo 
Direct to You." Find out why Kalamazoo, 
established over 35 years, is now doing the 
biggest business in its history. Learn why 
Kalamazoo can give you better quality at a 
lower price. Mail coupon for new FREE 
Catalog! 

"Oven That Floats in Flame" 

This new catalog tells you about the great 
Kalamazoo plants, occupying 26 acres, em- 
ploying an army of men, making nothing 
but our own stoves and furnaces that are 
sold direct to you. It shows the scientific 



Testing Laboratory that insures the high- 
est standard of quality for every Kala- 
mazoo. It describes the numerous Kala- 
mazoo features; such as the prize- winning 
"Oven That Floats in Fame," "Ripple Oven 
Bottom," Copper Reservoirs, Non-Scorch 
Lids, Enameled Ovens, etc. 

Porcelain Enamel Stoves 

In this finely illustrated catalog you will 
thrill at the new-style Porcelain Enamel 
Combination Gas, Coal and Wood Ranges, 
and Coal and Wood Ranges, so beautiful 
and colorful that you won't be content until 
you have one for your very own — Porcelain 
Enamel Circulating Heaters, including the 
famous Franklin and the new, ultra-modem 
Century, the handsomest, sturdiest ever 
seen — Furnaces — both pipe and pipeless. 
(Send rough sketch of your rooms for FREE 
plans.) Mail coupon today! 



Buy 



the 



Your Stoves Direct from 
Men Who Make Them 

Kalamazoo Improvements and Designs are 
modern, but Kalamazoo Quality is still 
the good, old-fashioned kind. We still build 
into every Kalamazoo the same high grade 
materials, the same fine workmanship that 
over 950,000 customers have known for J^ 



of a century. We are specialists, building 
nothing but stoves and furnaces. When you 
deal with Kalamazoo, you deal direct with 
the Factory — direct with the men who 
actually make your stoves and furnaces. 
Don't pay more than the FACTORY 
PRICE — mail coupon today for the na- 
tion's greatest stove and furnace guide- 
book! 

What This Catalog Offers You 

1. Cash or Easy Terms — Year to Pay — as 

little as 18c a day. 

2. 30 Days FREE TRIAL— 360 Days Ap- 

proval Test. 

3. 24 Hour Shipment— Safe Delivery Guar- 

anteed. 

4. SI 00.000 Bank Bond Guarantee of Satis- 
faction. 

5. 5 Year Parts Guarantee. 

6. FREE Furnace Plans. 

Address all mail to Factory at Kalamazoo. 
THE KALAMAZOO STOVE CO., Mfrs. 

469 Rochester Avenue, Kalamazoo, Michigan 

Warehouses: Utica, N. Y. ; Akron, Ohio; 

Harrisburg, Pa.; Springfield, Mass. 



A Kalamazoo, 

T c££? Direct to You' 




KALAMAZOO STOVE CO., Mfrs. 

469 Rochester Avenue, Kalamazoo, Michigan 

Dear Sirs: Please send me your Free Catalog. 
Check articles in which you are interested. 

Coal and Wood Range □ 
Comb. Gas. Coal and Wood Range □ 
Heater □ Oil Stove □ Furnace □ 



(Phase Print Name Plainly) 



State 

i tht fmck el i Govt. P' u titd) 



NOVEMBER - 1935 




VOL 5 - NO. I 



BELLE LANDESMAN, ASSISTANT EDITOR 



ERNEST V. HEYN. 
EDITOR 



Radio Mirror's Directory 6 

Vital statistics on NBC players 

Amateurs at Life Fred Sammis 1 2 

Read this engrossing radio novel about two eager amateurs 

Behind Closed Doors 15 

What your loudspeaker will bring you in the coming season 

Win Some of the $500.00 in Cash Prizes 16 

The big Jack Benny — "Broadway Melody of 1936" contest 

What Radio Means To Me Faith Baldwin 18 

This famous author has exciting views on radio favorites 

How Hollywood Puts the Stars on the Spot . Adele Whitely Fletcher 2 1 

You Don't Know the Half of It! Lester Gottlieb 28 

The strange story of Al Jolson and Victor Young 
Stream-lining Connie Gates Lee Pennington 30 

Radio's Miracle Man John Edwards 32 

Do you know who he is? 

Facing the Music John Skinner 36 

Keeping up-to-date with music and musicians 

"Sleep" 38 

Words and music of Fred Waring's theme song 

The Great Radio Murder Mystery Frederick Rutledge 

At last — the murderer revealed! 



Secrets of a Society Hostess Cobina Wright 

What this amazing woman's experiences can teach you! 

Ripley's House of Strange Treasures Everetta Love 

His Believe-it-or-Noddities in pictures and story 



Reflections In the Radio Mirror 

Have a Chat with the Editor 

What's New On Radio Row Jay Peters 

Coast-to-Coast Highlights 

Chicago Chase Giles 

Pacific Dr. Ralph L. Power 



41 
42 
46 



Pageant of the Airwaves 24 

Join the colorful caravan of ether favorites 

Beauty Is In Your Hands Joyce Anderson 40 

What Do You Want to Know? The Oracle 44 

We'll answer your questions 

What Do You Want to Say? 45 

Voice your opinions and win a prize 

Cooking a La Madame Sylvia Mrs. Margaret Simpson 48 

We Have With Us 50 

The perfect radio program guide 



WALLACE H. CAMPBELL, ART EDITOR 



in the December RADIO MIRROR 
On Sale October 25 




One of the biggest events this fall is the 
new series starring Helen Hayes. Don't 
miss the novel and unusual feature on this 
program in next month's issue. It's different! 
Also, we're revealing for the first time a 
slant on James Melton's career never 
before published. There's a great story on 
Boake Carter and many other features! 



The Critic on the Hearth 3 

Reviewing the new radio programs 

Snap-shooting Al Pearce and His 

Gang 20 

Gallery 

Helen Hayes 33 

Bing Crosby and Dixie Lee 34 

Kay Thompson 35 

Contest Winners 66 



Co<yeh 



—PORTRAIT OF FRANCES LANGFORD 
BY TCHETCHET 



RADIO MIRROR (Copyright 1935) is folly protected by copyright, and the contents of this magazine may not be reprinted either wholly or in part 
without permission. Published monthly by Macfadden Publications, Inc., Washington and South Avenues, Dunellen, New Jersey. Executive and 
editorial office, 1926 Broadway, New York, N. Y. Bernarr Macfadden, President; Wesley F. Pape, Secretary; Irene T. Kennedy, Treasurer; Walter 
Hanlon, Advertising Director. Entered as second class matter September 14, 1933, at the Post Office at Dunellen, New Jersey, under the Act of March 3, 
1879. Price in United States $1.00 a year; 10c a copy. In U. S. Possessions, Canada, Newfoundland, Cuba, Mexico and Panama $1.50 a year; all 
other countries $3.00 a year. While Manuscripts, Photographs and Drawings are submitted at the owners' risk, every effort will be made to return 
those found unavailable if accompanied by 1st class postage. But we will not be responsible for any losses of such matter contributed. Contributors are 
especially advised to be sure to retain copies of their contributions; otherwise they are taking an unnecessary risk. Printed in the U. S. A. by Art Color 

Printing Company, Dunellen, N. J. 

2 



Hi 



RADIO M I RROR 



The Critic 
On the Hearth 

By Weldon Melick 

EVENING IN PARIS distills the best 
in popular French and American melody 
as its sponsors distill the fragrance of 
Flanders flowers for the perfume to which 
this program is dedicated. Odette Myrtil's 
spicy accent, in song and speech, brings 
Paris into your parlor, and most 
happily. The Pickens Sisters, whose ap- 
peal loses none of its charm away from 
the footlights, contribute greatly to the 
success of this feature which has been 
revived after two years of absence from 
the air. Milton Watson, tenor, is fur- 
ther increasing his large following and 
Mark Warnow's orchestra sets the pace 
for the entire revue. 

The only conspicuous room for im- 
provement is in the selection of French 
songs, which now lean heavily toward the 
frivolous, passing up some of the really 
great and equally entertaining French 
masterpieces of lyric. 

NBC Mondays, 8:30 P. M.. 30 min. 

THE HIT PARADE comes to the front 
with Fred Astaire out-tapping and out- 
singing his own shadow of the stage and 
screen. Lennie Hayton's orchestra is a 
true "barometer" of musical hits of the 
week, taking its cues from actual music 
store sales records. In the parade also are 
Gogo de Lys, Kay Thompson and the 
Three Rhythm Kings. 

NBC Saturdays, 8 P. M., 60 min. 

BACK-STAGE WIFE is strongly 
reminiscent of Horatio Alger, Jr., with 
"reverse-English." In this new serial it is 
the small-town girl who makes good in 
the big city. A pleasant mid-morning in- 
terlude for the toiling housewife. 

MBS daily except Saturdays and Sun- 
days, 10:45 A.M., 15. min. 

EMERY DEUTSCH'S DANCE 
RHYTHMS, with Connie Gates, vocalist, 
enliven the dinner hour. If Miss Gates is 
singing for her supper she deserves the 
best chef d'oeuvre that Oscar of the Wal- 
dorf can achieve. 

CBS Wednesdays, 8:15 P. M., 15 min. 

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE BIBLE— Is 
evangelizing sophisticates in spite of them- 
selves. Dr. Frederick K. Stamm reveals 
little known facts about the world's "best 
seller." A male quartette opens and closes 
the program. 

NBC Sundays, 1:30 P. M., 30 min. 

LOIS RAVEL, contralto, was given an 
enviable spot for her first big radio ap- 
pearance, and has fully justified Colum- 
bia's hunch. A slightly wider range, to 
include more songs that are immortal, 
would endear this new favorite to still 
more thousands. Miss Ravel is fortunate 
in having Leith Stevens' orchestra for a 
harmony background. 

CBS Fridays, 10:30 P. M., 30 min. 

DOT AND WILL is one of the most 
entertaining dramatic sketches on the 
waves. The story is faithful to suburban 
life and keeps moving with sustained sus- 
pense. The dialogue is clear, but lacks 
contrast in tempo, a flaw which cannot 
go long without correction. This drama- 
tization of Fannie Kilbourne's famous fic- 
tion series is full of light, gay situations 
of interest to the whole family. 
(Continued on page 87) 



FREE! 

Trial Size bottle 

PACKER S S/uunpoa 



You get thi 

FREE 




when you buy THIS 

full size bottle at regular price 



«"« MFC CO INC 
»<* YORK 



Now see what Packer's can do for your hair. No need to put 
up longer with oily, stringy hair — or dry, lusterless wisps. 



For a limited time we are attaching a spe- 
cial Trial Size Bottle to each package of 
Packer's Shampoo. Doubtless your dealer 
has the combination-package on display. 
If not, he can easily get it for you. 

You see, we want a host of new friends 
to discover how the right Packer Shampoo 
reveals the hidden beauty of their hair. 

OLIVE OIL for Dry hair 

PINE TAR for Oily hair 

— both for your hair's beauty 

There are two Packer Shampoos, you know. 
Packer's Olive Oil Shampoo, for example, 
is made especially for dry hair. In addition 
to nourishing olive oil, it contains glycerine 




to soothe and soften your hair until it shines 
like silk. 

Use Packer's Pine Tar Shampoo, if your 
hair is oily. This shampoo is gently astrin- 
gent — it tightens up relaxed oil glands; 
washes out the excess oil and rinses cleanly. 
Leaves your hair soft and fluffy. 

Try Packer's Shampoo 

without risk 

Take advantage of this special offer: You 
get, free, enough Packer's for 2 washings, 
when you buy the full-size. Use the trial 
bottle first. If you don't agree that Packer's 
brings out your hair's full loveliness, re- 
turn the large bottle unopened to your 
dealer and get your money back. 

Look for this display at better 
drug and department stores 

* 



Does he admire your hair close up? 
Let Packer's reveal its beauty. 




THINGS 

I 

CANT 

UNDERSTAND 



REFLECTIONS IN 
THE RADIO MIRROR 



%%TH\ the radio row know-it-alls insist on trying to 
find some one who will "take Will Rogers' place" 
when it's so abundantly clear that no one ever can 
or will. 

WJ^THY Lanny Ross and Olive White Ross didn't let 
his fans in on their romance sooner. Or why we 
who knew about it were asked not to tell what we 
knew. And why we had to 

wait till this late date to wish _^^^^— ^^^^^^ 

them the happiness publicly 
which we've been wishing 'em 
privately for months and 
and months. 



\%^HY sponsors don't kick 
and scream until Fred As- 
taire consents to appearing 
regularly on his own program, 
his being the brightest star to 
shine in radio heavens for 
many a month. 

^MTHY a program which has 
won enthusiastic "fans be- 
cause of its magnificent weekly 
survey of the news should de- 
liberately endanger its per- 
spective and weaken its news- 
summary appeal by attempt- 
ing a shorter five-times-a-week 
broadcast. 

^k%TH\ Stoopnagle and Budd 
should be so consistently 
funny on an insignificant late- 
at-night unsponsored program 
and so glaringly uneven on a 
big national program under 
apparently perfect auspices. 



words heard last winter and spring by his eager 
followers. 

"WM^HY the projected broadcasts from Ethiopia 
shouldn't be used to bring into the hearts and 
homes of the American people the horror and fear- 
fulness of war, this being the first time radio ever 
actually broadcast from the trenches. 




This is the way we shall remem- 
ber him — his smile that touched 
every pointed rebuke with good 
humor; his eyes which looked in- 
to you and me, our nation and 
our government, saw clearly our 
foibles and weaknesses; his lips 
which spoke without affectation 
the jests and judgments that 
brought him so close to your 
heart and to mine. 



^•J^HY Johnny Green should 
not become the most im- 
portant maestro in radio now 
that he's following up his 
grand work on Socony Sketches 
with regular appearance on 
Jack Benny's show. 

[OW Alexander Woollcott 
was able to buck the Jack 
Benny program so successfully 
last year that his sponsors are 
willing to take the same dif- 
ficult hour this year? 

^jM^HY radio isn't used to ce- 
ment relationships be- 
tween nations by means of 
specially planned programs in 
which one nation's leader ad- 
dresses the people of another 
nation? 

JJOW Jimmy Wallington 
could afford to give up 
his many NBC programs to 
devote himself exclusively to 
one CBS program, even 
though it's going to be great 
to hear him again with Eddie 
Cantor. 



the air at least once a week. 



OW producers of the Ray Noble program expect ^^HY Nelson Eddy, a smash movie hit, isn't on 
us to believe that those five people from the audi- t u„ „;». a * i aaa * ««™» o w^L 

ence are actually picked at random — aren't the ques- 
tions and answers a bit too pat for conviction? 

^^L^PH ;i man with Jerry Cooper's potentialities for 
popularity should have gone unsponsored for so 
many months. 



Here are my frank comments on this and that. Do you 
agree with me? Whether you do or not, write me. 
Prizes for the best letters are announced on Page 45 




[OW the rumor that Father Coughlin will line up 
with F. D. R. this fall can be true; unless the good 
Father is prepared to eat thousands and thousands of 






If you dorit tell your husband I will i 



! 



99 




DR. LINITA BERETTA 
leading gynecologist of Milan, Italy, 
tells how a marriage was saved 
from disaster, when a timid wife 
found courage to face the facts 

One day a timid 

young woman came 

into my office . . . 

nervous, worried, 

unhappy. She told 

me her husband, 

too, had become irritable and cold. 

In fact, he wanted to give up his 

business and get away. .. by himself. 

"Then out came the usual story of 
ignorance, fear and false modesty. 
I showed her how proper marriage 
hygiene with reliable "Lysol" 
would provide the peace of mind 
which would calm her worries, re- 
place fear with assurance. Even then 
she was timid. 

"Finally I said, 'If you don't tell 
your husband your real problem . . . 
I will!' 

"She was almost hysterical with fear 
and embarrassment, but she knew 
that I meant what I said. A few 
months later she came to me again — 
a different woman ! 

'"I thought you were cruel,' she con- 
fessed. 'But now I'm so grateful. My 
husband and I are happy again!' 

"I would like to give every married 
woman the same advice, which has 
helped so many of my patients . . . 
proper feminine hygiene. Regular 
use of "Lysol"— because "Lysol" is 
a truly effective germicide. And yet, 
used in the proper dilution, it is 
gentle, soothing* — and so reliable, 
physicians everywhere prefer it." 

(Signed) DR. LINITA BERETTA 




"She was almost hysterical with fear and embarrassment . . . but my advice 
about "LysoF' restored her happiness." 



6 "Lysol." Features Important to You 

1. Safety. . ."Lysol" is gentle and re- 
liable. Contains no free alkali; cannot 
harm delicate feminine tissues. 

2. Effectiveness . . ."Lysol" is a true 
germicide, which means that it is effect- 
ive under practical conditions ... in the 
body (in the presence of organic matter) 
and not just in test tubes. 

3. Penetration . . ."Lysol" solutions, 
because of their low surface tension, 
spread into hidden folds of the skin, and 
thus actually search out germs. 

4. Economy. . ."Lysol", because it is a 
concentrated germicide, costs less than 
one cent an application in the proper 
solution for feminine hygiene.. 

5. Odor . . .The odor of "Lysol" dis- 
appears immediately after use, leaving 
one both fresh and refreshed. 



6. Stability. . ."Lysol" keeps its full 
strength, no matter how long it is kept, 
or how much it is exposed. 

Don't risk your happiness on untried 
experiments when, for nearly 50 years, 
"Lysol" has proved it deserves the con- 
fidence of millions of women who use 
it, thousands of doctors who advise it. 

Throughout your home, fight 

germs with "Lysol" 

You can't see the millions of germs that 
threaten your family, but you must fight 
those invisible foes through disinfection. Use 
"Lysol" in washing handkerchiefs, bed linen, 
towels, and to clean telephone mouthpiece, 
door knobs, laundry, kitchen and bathroom. 




NEW I Lysol Hygienic Soap for bath, hands 
and complexion. Cleansing and deodorant. 

FACTS MARRIED WOMEN SHOULD KNOW 

Mail coupon for copy of interesting brochure — "LYSOL vs. 
GERMS," containing facts about Feminine Hygiene and 
other uses of "Lysol." 

Lehs & Fink, Inc., Bloomfield, N. J.. Dept. LY-67 
Sole Distributors of "Lysol" disinfectant 

Name 



Addriss- 



C 1935. Lehn & Kink, Inc. 

5 



RADIO MIRROR'S 
DIRECTORY 



How to write to your favorites 

The last item on each biography tells the city from which the player 

broadcasts. Here are the addresses: 

National Broadcasting Company — 

New York (abbreviated N. Y.): 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N.Y. 

San Francisco (abbreviated San F.): Ill Sutter St., San Francisco, 

Calif. 
Los Angeles (abbreviated LA.): 555 South Flower St., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 
Chicago (abbreviated Chic): Merchandise Mart, Chicago, III. 
Not all the players listed are on the network at the present time. 



A COMPLETE LISTING OF YOUR FAVORITES: BIRTHPLACE AND DATE; 
IF MARRIED, TO WHOM; RADIO DEBUT; ON WHAT PROGRAMS THEY 
APPEAR; WHERE YOU CAN WRITE THEM. THIS MONTH: NATIONAL 
BROADCASTING PLAYERS— NEXT MONTH: MORE NATIONAL STARS 



ACE. Goodman. Actor, leading role in "Easy Aces"; 
born Kansas City, Mo.. Jan. 15, 1899; married Jane 
Ace. 1928; debut in Kansas City. 1929. N. Y. 
ACE, Jane. Actress, leading role in "Easy Aces"; 
born Kansas City. Mo., Oct. 12, 1905; married Good- 
man Ace. 1928; debut in Kansas City. 1929. N. Y. 
ALBANI, Countess Olga. Soprano, "Silken Strings" ; 
born Barcelona, Spain, Aug. 13, 1905: married Count 
Arturo Albani; one son; debut over NBC, 1929. CHIC. 
ALBERT, Eddie. Comedian and singer. "The Honey- 
mooners"; born Rock Island, 111., April 22. 1908; un- 
married; debut in Minneapolis, 1930. N. Y. 
ALEXANDER. Helen. Soprano, "Capitol Family"; 
born New York City, June 3, 1911; unmarried: debut 
with "Capitol Family", 1933. N. Y. 
ALEXANDER, Durelle. Soprano, "Paul Whiteman's 
Music Hall"; born Greenville, Texas, March 30. 1918; 
debut in Shreveport. La., 1933. 

ALLEN. Fred. Comedian and master-of-cereinonies, 
"Town Hall Tonight": born Cambridge, Mass., May 
31, 1894; married Portland Hoffa ; debut in New York 
City, 1932. N. Y. 

ALLMAND, Joyce. Contralto. "Morning Devotions", 
etc. ; born Greenville, Texas, Feb. 18; unmarried; debut 
over local station in Texas. 1922. N. Y. 
AMECHE, Don. Actor. "Cainpana First-Nighter", 
etc.; born Kenosha, Wis.. May 31, 1908; married 





Gene Arnold 



Durelle Alexander 



Honore Prendergast; one son; debut in Chicago, 1931. 
CHIC. 

AMSTERDAM, Morey. Comedian, "Al Pearce and 
His Gang"; horn Chicago, 111., Dec. 14, 1909; unmar- 
ried; debut over KPO. San Francisco, 1922. N. Y. 
ANDREWS. Andy. Tenor and comedian, "Al Pearce 
and his Gang"; born Lincoln, Neb.. 1905; married Vera 
Alber; debut. 1928. N. Y. 

ARNOLD, Gene. Interlocutor. "Sinclair Minstrels"; 
born Newton, 111.; married; debut over WOK, Chicago, 
1928. CHIC. * 

BAAR, Bill. Actor, plays "Grandpa Burtorr" ; borta 
Chicago, May 17, 1909; unmarried; debut in Chicago, 
1927. N. Y. 

BABCOCK, Cells. Actress, "House of Glass" ; born 
New Haven. Conn., May 20, 1926; debut on Rudy Val- 
lee's program. 1933. N. Y. 

BACH, Alwyn. Narrator and announcer; born Worces- 
ter, Mass.. Jan. 24, 1898; married Olive C. Murphy; 
one daughter; debut in Springfield, Mass., October, 
1922. K. Y. 

BAER. Max. Actor; born Omaha. Neb., Feb, 16, 1909; 
married Mary Ellen Sullivan; debut in New York City. 
1934. N. Y. 

BAKER, Phil. Comedian and accordionist; married 
Margaret Cartwright; one son, one daughter; debut 
over NBC, 1933. N. Y. 

BARCLAY, John. Baritone, "Palmolive Beauty Box 
Theater"; born Bletchingley, England, May 12, 1892; 
married Madame Dagmar Rybner. pianist; one daugh- 
ter; debut in New York City. 1928. N. Y. 
BARRETT. Pat. Actor, plays "Uncle Ezra"; born 
Holden. Mo.. Sept. 27, 1887; married Nora Cunneen ; 
debut over WTMJ, Milwaukee, 1930. CHIC. 
BARTON, Frances Lee. Cooking expert. "Kitchen 
Party"; married: eight children; debut in New York 
City, 1932, N. Y. 

BECKER, Bob. Narrator. "Dog Chats"; born Terry- 
ytUe, S. D., Oct. 27. 1890; debut in Chicago, 1931. 
CHIC. 

BELL, Joseph. Announcer and narrator. "Sherlock 
Holmes", etc.; born Kansas City, Mo.. April 25. 1893; 
married; debut in New York City. 1927. N Y 
BELTZ, Donald. Baritone, "Two Seats in the Bal- 
cony"; born Pittsburgh, Pa., May 23, 1908; unmarried: 
debut in Pittsburgh. 1928. N. Y. 

BELVISO, Thomas. Orchestra leader, "Tuneful Tra- 
velogues ' ; born New Haven, Conn,. Jan. 25. 1898; 
married Elinor Mullins; two children; debut in New 
Haven. 1920. N. Y. 



BENNETT, Lois. Soprano, "Uncle Charlie's Tent 
Show"; born Houston, Texas; married Louis J. Chat- 
ten; two daughters, one son; debut over NBC. 1931. 
N. Y. 

BENNY, Jack. Comedian; born Chicago, Feb. 14, 1894; 
married Mary Livingstone; debut in New York City, 
1931. N. Y. 

BERG, Gertrude. Actress and author. "House of 
Glass ; born New York City, Oct. 3, 1900; married; 
one son, one daughter; debut in "Rise of the Gold- 
bergs", 1929. N. Y. 

BERGMAN, Teddy. Comedian, played "Blubber" in 
"Circus Night in Silvertown" ; born New Y'ork City. 
Aug. 20, 1907; married Finette Walker; debut over 
WOR. Newark, N. J., 1926. N. Y. 
BERNARD, Al. Comedian, "Molle Merry Minstrels"; 
born New Orleans, La., Nov. 23, 1889; marTied; two 
daughters; debut over WEAF. New York City, 1921. 
N. Y. 

BERNIE, Ben. Orchestra leader and comedian; born 
Bayonne, N. J.. May 31. 1893; married; one son;«debut 
from Roosevelt Hotel, New York City. 1920. N. Y. 
BERWHS. BernJce. Actress, "One Man's Family"; 
born San Francisco, Calif., April 4; married A. Brooks 
Berwin; one son; debut in San Francisco, 1928. SAN F. 
BESTOR, Don. Orchestra leader; born Langford. 
S. D.. Sept. 23, 1889; married Frankie Klassen, 1925; 
one daughter; debut over KDKA. Pittsburgh. 1922. 
N. Y. 

BISHOP, JUL Pianist with June, Joan, and Jeri trio; 
born Lisbon, N. D., Oct. 28, 1912; unmarried; debut 
in Chicago, 1935. CHIC. 

BLACK, Frank. Orchestra leader; born Philadelphia, 
Pa.. Nov. 28, 1894; married; debut from Fox Theater. 
Philadelphia, 1922. N. Y. 

BLACKBURN, Arllne. Actress, "House of Glass": 
born New York City, May 6. 1914; unmarried; debut 
over WOR. Newark, 1929. N. Y. 

BLAUFUSS. Walter. Orchestra leader, "Melody 
Mixers"; born Milwaukee, Wis., July 26. 1883; mar- 
ried; debut in Chicago. 1926. CHIC. 
BONIME. Joseph. Orchestra leader. "Death Valley 




Gertrude Berg 



Teddy Bergman 



Days", etc.; born Vilna. Poland, Feb. 26, 1891; mar- 
ried Josephine Marson; two children; debut in New 
York City, 1925. N. Y. 

BOURDON, Rosaiio. Orchestra leader, "Cities Ser- 
vice Concert"; born Montreal, Canada, March 6, 1885: 
married Esther Fisher; three children; debut over 
WEAF, 1923. N. Y. 

BOWES. Major Edward. Master-of-ceremonies, "Am- 
ateur Hour" and "Capitol Family"; born San Fran- 
cisco, June 14, 1874; widower; debut with "Capitol 
Family". 1925. N. Y. 

BOWLLY. Al. Singer with Ray Noble's orchestra; 
born Deloaga Bay, South Africa, Jan. 7, 1904; mar- 
ried Margaret Fairlees; American debut. 1935. N. Y. 
BRADT, Grace. {Grace Albert) Comedienne and 
singer, "The Honeymooners" ; born Minneapolis, Minn., 
June 16, 1908; unmarried; debut in Minneapolis. 1930. 
N. Y. 

BREEN, May Singh!. Musician and singer, partner 
of Peter I)e Rose; born New York City; married Peter 
De Rose ; one daughter by former marriage ; debut over 
WEAF, 1923. N. Y. 

BRIGCS, Don. Actor, "Welcome Valley", etc.; born 
Chicago, Jan. 28, 1911; unmarried; debut over KYW, 
Chicago. 1931. CHIC. 

BRODSKY, Vera. Pianist, partner of Harold Triggs; 
born Norfolk, Va.. July 1. 1910; unmarried; debut in 
New York City, 1932. N. Y. 

BROWN, George Frame. Actor, plays "Gus" in 
"Tony and Gus '; born Seattle, Wash., March 1. 1896: 
unmarried; debut over WABC, New York City, 1925. 
N. Y 

BROWN, Reed, Jr. Actor, "Roses and Drums"; born 
Minneapolis. Minn.. 1900; married Ruth Mero. actress. 
N. Y. 



BROWNELL, Kurt. Tenor; born i Wirmetka, 111.. Feb. 
27, 1908; -married; debut over NBC, 1927. N. Y. 
BRYGGER. Mary- Singer, member Verne, . Lee, and 
Mary trio, "National Barn Dance ; borii i Racine. Wis. . 
Sept 7, 1914; unmarried; debut over WRJN. Kacine. 

CMN. Noble. Director of A Capella Choir; born Au- 
rora, Ind., Sept. 25, 1906;, married; four daughters; 
debut in Chicago over NBC, 1932 CHIC. 
CARLAY, Rachel. Singer. "Manhattan Merry-Go- 
Round"; born Belgium, May 24, 1911; unmarried; de- 
but on Rudy Vallee program. 1933. N \ 
CARLISLE. Charles. Tenor "The Hit Parade ; born 
Cumberland. R. I., 1904; unmarried; debut over 

WEAN. Cumberland, 1923. N. Y. 

CAROTHERS, Isabel. Actress, plays Lu in Clara, 
Lu V Em"; born Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. Nov. 6. 1905; 
married Howard Berolzheimer ; one son (adopted); 
debut over WON, Chicago, 1930. CHIC. 
CASPER. Emll. Comedian, "Molle Merry Minstrels ; 
born St. Louis, Mo.. Nov. 8. 1897; married; debut 
over NBC. 1935. N. Y. • 

CASSEL, Walter. Baritone; born Council Bluffs. 
Iowa, May 15, 1910; married; one son, one daughter; 
debut over KOIL. Council Bluffs. N. Y. 
CAST1LLIA, Carmen. Singer; born Mexico City. 
Mexico, June 21 ; married Xavier Cugats debut in Cali- 
fornia, 1927. N. Y. . 
CHAMBER! AIN, Howard R. Announcer. "National 
Barn Dance'; born Rochester. Ind.. March 10. 1907; 
married; two sons; debut over WHOG. Huntington, 

Ind., 1925. CHIC. ^ ^ 

CHAMLEE, Mario. Tenor, plays "Tony" in "Tony 
and Gus"; born Los Angeles. Calif., May 29, 1892; 
married Ruth Miller; debut in New York City, 1930. 
N. Y. ... 

CHILDS, Bill. Comedian. "Sinclair Minstrels ; mar- 
ried; three children; debut over KYW, Chicago. 1930. 
CHIC. 

CHILDS, Reggie. Orchestra leader; born London. 
England. Dec. 25, 1904; unmarried. N. Y. 
CHRISTIE, Kenneth C. Pianist with Songsmiths 
Quartet; born Binghamton, N. Y.. Aug. 25, 1901; 
married; debut over WOR. Newark, 1931. N. Y. 
CLEMENS, Jack. Partner of Loretta Clemens. "Uncle 
Charlie's Tent Show"; born Cleveland, Ohio, May 28. 
1908; unmarried; debut over WHK. Cleveland, 1924. 
N. Y. 

CLEMENS, Loretta. Singer and actress. "Uncle 
Charlie's Tent Show".; born Marblehead. Ohio. May 6. 
1906; married; debut over WHK. Cleveland. 1924. 
N. Y. 

COBURN, Jolly. Orchestra leader: born Sea Cliff. 
N. Y. ; unmarried; debut over WJZ, Newark. 1921. 
N. Y. 

COLEMAN, Emll. Orchestra leader: born Odessa. 
Russia, June 19, 1892; married Ruth Zausner; one son; 
debut over WJZ, 1923. N. Y. 




Joe Cook 



Rachel Carlay 



COOK, Joe. Comedian; born Chicago, 111., 1887; mar- 
ried; debut over NBC, 1934. N. Y. 
COOK, Phil. Singer and comedian; born Coldwater. 
Mich.. Sept. 27; married Flo Helmer; two daughters; 
debut in New York City, October. 1923, N. Y. 
CORDOBA Sisters. Vocal trio. "Continental Vari- 
eties"; all born in Mexico: Angelita. Oct. 28; Lolita, 
March 29; Anita, Sept. 6. All unmarried; all made 
debut in Washington. D. C. 1932. N. Y. 
CORRELL, Charles J. Actor, plays "Andy" in 
"Amos 'n' Andy": born Peoria, 111.. Feb. 3, 1890: 
married Marie Janes. January, 1927; debut over WGN 
in act called "Sam and Henry", 1929. CHIC. 
COSENTINO, Nicholas. Tenor, "Capitol Family" : 
born Toronto, Canada, Feb. 3, 1905; unmarried: debut 
in New York City. 1932. N. Y. 

COZZI, Mario. Baritone, "Continental Varieties" ; 
born Florence, Italy. Oct. 28, 1903; married Gertrude 
Teffler: two children; debut, 1929. N. Y. 
CRAWFORD, Jesse. Organist; born Woodland. 



FOR THE FIRST TIME: A 
COMPLETE DIRECTORY 
OF RADIO PLAYERS- 
A VALUABLE GUIDE 
NO RADIO ENTHUSI- 
AST CAN BE WITHOUT! 



Calif. Dec 2. 189S; married Helen Anderson; one 
daughter; debut. 1930. CHIC. 

CROSS, Milton J. Announcer; born New York City: 
married; debut in New York City. September. 1921. 
N Y 

CUGAT, Xavler. Orchestra leader; born Barcelona. 
Spain. Dec. 21, 1900; married Carmen Castillia; debut 
in New Jersey. 1920. N. Y. 

CUNNEEN, Nora. Actress. Uncle Ezra s Radio 
Station"; born Chicago. Feb. 22, 1894; married Pat 
Barrett; debut over WTMJ. Milwaukee. 1929. CHIC. 
DALY, William. Orchestra leader for John Charles 
Thomas; etc.; born Cincinnati. Ohio. Sept. 1. 1887: 
married Elizabeth Snyder; one child: debut in New 
York Citv. 1929. N. Y. 

DAMROSCH. Dr. Walter. Symphony orchestra con- 
ductor and music commentator; born Breslau, Ger- 
many, Jan. 30. 1862; married Margaret Blaine; four 
daughters: debut from Carnegie Hall. New York City. 
Oct. 29. 1923. N. V. 

DANE, Frank. Actor, plays "Sunbeam" in "Virginia 
I.ee and Sunbeam"; bom Aalborg. Denmark, July 13. 
1905; unmarried; debut in Evanston. 111.. 1926. CHIC. 
DARBY, Ken. Bass and Pianist. King's Men Quar- 
tet. "Paul Whiteman's Music Hall"; born Nebraska. 
May 13. 1909; married Vera Matson; debut over 
KHJ. Los Angeles. I92S. N. Y. 

DARCY. Emery. Baritone. "House by the Side of 
the Road"; born Chicago. Dec. 9. 1908; married Luci 
Lenox; debut over WGN. Chicago. 1931. CHIC. 
DAVIES. Edward. Baritone. "Words and Music" : 
born Rhymney. Wales. Aug. 25, 1901; married; debut 
over 1 KLZ. Denver. 1923. CHIC. 

D'AVREY. Jacques. Tenor: "Continental Varieties"; 
born Paris, France. June 1. 1907; unmarried; debut 
over Radio-Paris. 1931 ; U. S debut over NBC. March. 
1932. N. Y. 

DAWSON, Nick. Lead in "Dangerous Paradise" , 
etc.; born Vineland, N. J., May 3; married; debut 
over CBS. N. Y. 

DEIS, Carol. Soprano. "Two Seats in the Balcony": 
born Dayton, Ohio, March 10. 1907; formerly married; 
one son; debut on Atwater Kent Audition. 1931. N. Y. 
DE LEATH. Vaurhn. Contralto: born Mt. Pulaski, 
111. ; married; debut in New York City, first woman 
to sing over the air. December. 1919. N. Y. 
DE LYS. Gabrlelle "Gogo". Singer. "The Hit 
Parade"; born Edmonton. Alberta. Canada. Aug. 17; 
unmarried; debut in Los Angeles. 1933. N. Y. 
DENNY, Jack. Orchestra leader; born Greencastle. 
Ind. ; married ; debut over WJZ in early days of radio. 
N. Y. 

DE ROSE, Peter. Pianist and singer, partner of May 
Singhi Breen; born New York City; married May- 
Singhi Breen; debut over WEAF. 1923. N. Y. 
DERRY, E. J. Singer, member of Three Cheers Trio. 
"Al Pearce and His Gang"; born Kansas City. Mo.. 
Feb. 1. 1907; married Blanche Van; debut. 1926. 
N. Y. 

DODSON, JBn. Tenor. King's Men Quartet. "Paul 
Whiteman's Music Hall "; born Missouri. March. 1907; 
unmarried: debut over KEJK. Beverly Hills. Calif.. 
1927. N. Y. 

DOWNEY, Morton. Tenor; born Wallingford. Conn.. 
Nov. 14, 1901; married Barbara Bennett; three chil- 
dren; debut in New York City. 1931. N. Y. 
DRAGONETTE. Jessica. Soprano, "Cities Service 
Concert": born Calcutta. India. Feb. 14; unmarried: 
debut over NBC. 1926. N. Y. 

DUCHIN. Eddie. Orchestra leader and Pianist: born 
Boston. Mass.. April 1. 1909: married Marjorie de 
Loosey Oelrichs: debut with Leo Reisman's orches 
tra. 1928. N. Y. 

DUEY, Phil. Baritone with Leo Reisman's orche*. 
tra. etc.; born Macy. Ind.. June 22. 190?: married 
Catherine Sroufe : debut in New York City. 1927 
N. Y. 

EASTMAN. Morgan L. Orchestra leader: "Con- 
tented Program"; born Marinette. Wis.. Nov 3. 
1885; married Mae Enright ; debut over KYW. Chi- 
cago. 1921. CHIC. 

EDKINS, Alden. Bass-baritone; born Somerville. 
Mass.. June 19. 1907; unmarried; debut over WBZ. 
Boston. 1929. N. Y 

EDMONDSON, William. Basso and director Southern- 
aires Quartet, born Spokane. Wash.. Oct 15 1902- 
unmarried : debut over NBC. 1930 N Y 
EGGLESTON, Charles. Actor. "Ma Perkins": born 
Covington. Ky. July 16. 1882: married Nell Floyd; 
debut over WLW, Cincinnati. July. 1929 CHIC 
f LLE ^f' Mm 5 ,t "<, - A ««ss. "One Man's Family" ; 
born Cleveland. Ohio. Jan. 17; widow; one daughter- 
debut in San Francisco. 1932. SAN F 
ETT1NC. Ruth. Singer. "Kellogg College Prom": 
bora David City. Neb.; married Col. Moe Snyder. 

EUSTACE, Edwlna. Contralto. "Radio City Music 
Hall of the Air ; born New York Citv. Sept 1. 1911 • 
unmarried; debut from Commodore Hotel. New York 
Citv. l**25. N. Y. 

V^Py**' ^'"""k Actor ' " Ma Perkins"; born 
Mankato. Minn.. Nov. 24. 1907; married Mildred 
Johnson; debut over WGN. Chicago. 1930. CHIC 

(Continued on page 57) 







Vauqhn De Leath 



Phil Duey 



A tribute to her Beauty Soap 

from a very 



/**% 



cj-oveuf n/ude 




She began with Camay at Barnard 
—this darkish blonde beauty with 
the hazel eyes. And while she has a 
naturally good, clear skin — Camay 
has helped it — year by year — to a 
marvelous purity and smoothness. 
She will tell you so just as she 
has told so many of her friends! 
And it's just such casual conversa- 
tions of today's modern young 
women that are adding so rapidly 



CAMAY 

% Sytzfi of SecuctcfuZ Iwrntett, 



to Camay's popularity. They know, 
and say, that it is gentle and mild 
— that it does make your skin 
smoother — that it does help to 
bring new" softness and clarity to 
your complexion. You'll be de« 
lighted with Camay's low price. 

Let Camay bring your loveliness to light. 





U>#tojCb ywjj gtvl 



IS radio going sexy like the movies? 
Take it from a close observer 
of the studio scene the answer is 
an emphatic yes. Subtly, but neverthe- 
less effectively, sex is being injected 
into broadcasting. It has been intro- 
duced so gradually and so ingeniously 
you may not have noticed it. But it is 
there just the same. 

Perhaps it is the approach of tele- 
vision that is making the studio sat- 
raps so sex conscious. Again, it may 
be a natural desire of sponsors to cash 
in on the theory that "all the world 
loves a lover" and adores a sweetheart. 
Whatever it is that is actuating the 
program potentates, the fact is they 
are working overtime trying to in- 
volve their artists in romances or in- 
spire the romantic interest of listeners 
in them. 

In the beginning radio wasn't like 
that. Middle-aged character actresses 
cooed ingenue roles. Actors with deep- 
lined faces impersonated juveniles. A 
two-hundred-pound singer rendered 
torch songs. What difference did it 
make, argued the broadcasting barons, 
the audienqe couldn't see them, could 
they? Then came the practice of ad- 
mitting spectators to the studios and 
the realization that the artists had to 
look their parts to be convincing. 

Prom this gradually grew the de- 
mand for personalities of glamor and 
charm, until today the broadcasting 
chambers are peopled with Ziegfeld 

8 



beauties and young leading 
men with handsome profiles. 
By devious ways of ingenious 
press agents the public is led 
to believe youthful singers 
on the same programs inva- 
riably fall in love with each 
other. If the air heroine hap- 
pens to have another heart 
interest and her engagement 
becomes public property — 
and this isn't a supposition 
but an incident founded on 
fact — why another unat- 
tached companion is prompt- 
ly provided for the hero, that 
the listening public may not 
lose interest in their honeyed 
words as poured forth 
through the -loudspeaker for 
the whole world to hear. 

This may all seem silly to 
a cynic but romantic inter- 
est properly handled is a 
great thing to build up and 
hold an audience. Nora 
Bayes and Jack Norworth 
discovered how effective it was on the 
stage years ago. Ditto Julia Sanderson 
and Frank Crumit. And the latter 
introduced the husband-and-wife-still- 
lovers theme to radio with equally 
successful results. May Singhi Breen 
and Peter de Rose as the "Sweethearts 
of the Air" have also capitalized on 
this idea and there are hosts of others. 
It all comes under the head of enter- 
tainment and amusement — and modern 
showmanship. 

CONSPICUOUS among the new 
^-^ stars on the networks this Fall is 
Helen Hayes, by many regarded the 
first lady of the American stage. Miss 
Hayes, who recently renounced the 
movies, comes to the studios with a 
brand new vehicle adapted to her tal- 
ents by Edith Meiser, skilled in the 
technique of radio writing as demon- 
strated by her adaptation of the Sher- 
lock Holmes stories. Miss Hayes, after 
several guest appearances in condensed 
versions of former stage successes, 
proved herself the possessor of a 
charming microphone personality and 
is assured a tremendous following. 
This partnership between player and 
playwright promises to be almost per- 
fect. 

ASK Graham McNamee and Tom 
^^ Manning, ace air reporters of 
sporting events, and they will tell you 
the most dangerous sport they ever 
covered was the all-American Soap-Box 
Derby at Akron, Ohio. A skidding 
chariot guided by a small boy suddenly 
became a Juggernaut, crashed into the 



judges' stand where the mikemen were 
stationed and promptly claimed them 
victims, necessitating medical atten- 
tion. These veterans have given thrill- 
ing eye-witness accounts of many major 
sporting contests without sustaining 
anything more serious than strained 
vocal cords but along comes this race 
between home-made scooters steered 
by juveniles and the radio observers 
are sent to the hospital for repairs. 
Surely this momentous happening must 
be significant of something or other. If 
nothing else it shows what a rapid pace 
the younger generation is traveling 
these days — and what grave perils this 
pace involves for their elders ! 

JLfl-EAN WHILE, Radio Row ex- 
pects the new Jack Benny pro- 
gram, which will just about get going 
when you read this, to continue as the 
outstanding comedy act of the air. The 
new set-up certainly is most promising; 
Michael Bartlett is a personality al- 
ready firmly established in the hearts 
of movie-goers and Johnny Green needs 
no introduction to the radio audience. 
Mary Livingstone, of course, continues, 
and likewise Don Wilson. Sam Hearn, 
is also expected to return to the cast. 
And Harry Conn, collaborator with 



Upper corner, Grade Allen and 
George Burns get serious when the 
luncheon bell rings at the Paramount 
studios. Below, Ruth Etting, songstress 
of the air, receives a floral welcome 
to Hollywood from Buster Crabbe. 




"Hjax&w- ~R<rur 



Benny in concocting the comedy, re- 
mains to write the continuity. Benny, 
thoroughly sold on the idea a comedian 
is only as funny as his material, pays 
Conn |1200 a week for his services and 
insists Conn earns every penny of it. 
"His is a tough job," says Benny, "be- 
cause he has to adapt himself to my 
mental processes, if any. 

A script writer, to deliver the goods, 
must, to all intents and purposes be- 
come the mental double of the comic — 
and believe me that's some chore." 

WWENDRIK WILLEM VAN LOON 
■^^ is broadcasting now before a 
studio audience. This is news because 
for a long time the noted author 
wouldn't even allow members of his 
own family to see him in action. The 
change in heart came about because 
the dead-pan mike, so cold and unre- 
sponsive, finally got Van Loon's goat 
and he thought he would have to add 
a "y" to his name. 

Craving human companionship, he 
now insists on having present specimens 
— any specimens — of his fellow man. 
At least they lend their moral support 
while he speaks his thoughts into that 
dreaded black box — known as the mi- 
crophone — which has frightened many 
a performer. 

Eddie Cantor and Parkyakalcas in a 
scene from the Samuel Goldwyn pro- 
duction, "Shoot the Works." Below, 
frank Parker and his fiance, Dorothy 
Martin, in the gardens of the Saint 
Catherine Hotel on Catalina Island. 



Hide World 



'W'HREE of Columbia's crack con- 
-* ductors, Johnny Green, Mark War- 
now and Howard Barlow, are leading 
bands this fall on the NBC kilocycles. 
They are there because sponsors de- 
mand their talents and it doesn't indi- 
cate they have severed relations with 
their alma mater. Indeed, the Colum- 
bia System's artist bureau is collecting 
big fees in commissions for their 
services on the rival network and is 
quite content with the arrangement. 

MARRIAGES AND SUCH 

A development more than once fore- 
cast in these columns became reality 
when Lanny Ross married Olive White, 
his charming and capable personal 
representative. Intimates of the young 
couple were aware of their attachment 
for some time and the announcement 
of their wedding made after a Show 
Boat broadcast (Please turn to page 10) 

United Artists 





ISN'T YOUR 



HEALTH WORTH 
THREE MINUTES!" 



I don't consider three minutes of my time 
a very high price to pay for banishing 
headaches and the tired feeling that 
come from constipation. Particularly 
when during those three minutes* you 
simply chew a delicious gum like FEEN- 
A-MINT. Of course, if you aren't will- 
ing to spend three minutes, harsh "all- 
at-once" cathartics will have to do. But 
what a difference chewing makes! With 
FEEN-A-MINT there are no cramps, 
no griping, no bad after-effects ! Try the 
three-minute way yourself. Only 15c and 
25c for a large supply. 

ATTENTION, MOTHERS- FEEN- 
A-MINT is ideal for everybody, and 
how children love it ! 



* Lonjrer if you care to 



better 
because 

you 
chew it 




NEWS WHEN IT HAPPENS AND GOSSIP WHEN IT'S NEW 



in Radio City occasioned little surprise. 
Miss White has been managing and ex- 
ploiting Lanny's business affairs for two 
years and is well qualified to handle his 
matrimonial affairs as well. Olive White 
was a widow and has a daughter fourteen 
years old. 

In sharp contrast to the happy out- 
come of Lanny's romance is the experience 
of >Eugene F. Carroll, the Gene of radio's 
popular Gene and Glen team. With Miss 
Wilhetmina Leonard, actress of Colum- 
bus, O.. on his arm. Gene applied to the 
New York marriage license bureau and 
was granted a permit to wed. Then the 
prospective bride and groom smiling hap- 
pily, departed in search of a preacher. 
They never found him. Something, no- 
body seems to know just what, came up 
to disrupt their plans and the marriage 
didn't take place. 

By the time you read this Betty Bar- 



thell should be the bride of Aviator 
Charles Vaughn. The ceremony was 
scheduled to be performed in Yokohama, 
•where Vaughn is in the employ of Pan- 
American Airways. Before Betty sailed 
for Japan she was given a farewell party 
attended by Vivienne Segal, Annette Han- 
shaw, Virginia Verrill, Vera Van and the 
Pickens Sisters, among other radiorioles. 

Will Babs Ryan, recently melted from 
her "brother," marry Bob Merritt, the 
jockey? (Speaking of brothers, did you 
know Arthur Lang, the baritone, who 
poses as her brother, is really the hus- 
band of Jeanie Lang?) And Little Ryan, 
real brother of Charles Ryan, Bab's ex, 
is preparing to become a proud papa via 
the stork and not the adoption route. 
Mrs. Little Ryan is the former Bernice 
Niles. 

Cupid continues to shoot his darts into 
Ben Bernie's lads. Probably by the time 



this meets your eye Dick Stabile (who 
may also be heading his own band by that 
time) and Gracie Barrie, of the musical 
comedy stage, will have said I do." 
Previously the engagement of Frank 
Prince and Grace Bradley, of the Para- 
mount lot, was announced here. And Bill 
Wilson, still another Bernie bandman, is 
altar-bound with another of California's 
sun-kissed gals. 

Radio City associates insist Frank 
Black, NBC's general musical director, 
will soon marry Miss Eva Pedley, a lovely 
lady of the south. And Liebert Lom- 
bardo, of the Lombardo tribe, is plan- 
ning to elope in December with Miss 
Sally Brownback, a Junior Leaguer from 
Hewlett, L. I. Which reminds me, speak- 
ing of society, that Jean Sergent is said 
to be much smitten with Toni Sarno, 
photographer to the four hundred. And 
did you hear Cobina Wright, popular 



COASTS COAST HIG 



¥ 






CHICAGO 

BY CHASE GILES 



THE new act on NBC called Amos 'n' 
Andy is very good. Keep it on." 

Imagine the surprise of Amos 'n' 
Andy when they read that letter in their 
fan mail. But the explanation was simple 
after all. Even if you and I have known 
Amos 'n' Andy for years there are some 
people who are just getting acquainted 
with them. The reason is that just re- 
cently the boys switched their program 
from one NBC network to another. 
Naturally that resulted in some stations 
taking them for the first time. 

The same thing will happen to Lum 
and Abner this fall as NBC network fans 
gradually hear the Ozark philosophers 
for the first time although Chicago fans 
have been hearing them over WGN for 
a long time. 

* * * 

Although Wayne King has plenty of 
radio sets in his home and office he never 
listens to any radio orchestra except his 
own. Of course he listens to his own all 
the time to see how he can improve it. 
But listen to others . . . never! 

Edna Odell is the Hoosier Songbird 
whose contralto voice is heard on the 
Galaxy of Stars program over NBC. 



PACIFIC 

BY DR. RALPH L. POWER 



1 




There's a good reason for that. Wayne 
King has become nationally famous for 
a particular soft and dreamy style of 
waltz music. That is definitely his own 
style. Once long ago he went to New 
York to watch Guy Lombardo and his 
boys broadcast. Guy's boys did a specially 
nice arrangement of "When the Organ 
Plays at Twilight." Wayne liked it very 
much. Specially did he like the little runs 
on the saxophones. 

Wayne forgot all about that. He saw 
and heard many other bands before his 
vacation was over and he went back to 
work. Then one day his band was re- 
hearsing a program including that "Twi- 
light" number. Wayne thought of those 
saxophone runs and made his boys play 
it that way. He'd forgotten where he'd 
heard it done that way. In fact he frankly 
thought it was his own idea then. But 
just a few days later he heard the Lom- 
bardos doing it on a phonograph record 
and it suddenly dawned on him that he'd 
stolen something from Guy. Not only did 
he dislike stealing anything but also he 
didn't want to pervert or dilute his own 
style with something foreign. He's never 
heard any band except his own since that 

day. 

* * * 

Uncle Ezra was sure pleased the other 
day when a letter came from the Sis- 
ters of Charity at Mt. Pleasant, N. Y., 
saying how much they enjoyed his pro- 
grams. "It rests us so after too many 
hard minutes in a classroom," they said. 

* * * 

Policeman Henry Sheldon of Chicago 
surprised both himself and the police de- 
partment when it was announced he had 
won the prize in a radio contest. He had 
submitted the winning recipe for marsh- 
mallows! 

* * * 

An outstanding feature of Chicago radio 
programs this summer has been the band 
concerts staged in the shell at Grant Park. 
NBC, Columbia and WGN all took the 
concerts for several days and the public 
response was ((Continued on page 71) 



g"X)NGO" Bartlett came into the nick- 



I 



name five years ago on WOR when 
he gave an exploration talk. Now his 
Voice of Africa quarter hour on KFAC, 
Los Angeles, five nights of the week, is 
big moment in the lives of youngsters an 
grown-ups, too. 

But I'll venture to say that none of 'em 
knew that he was a surgeon in France for 
the British army; took his M.D. at Ox- 
ford and later a Ph.D. in languages. With 
eight years' exploration in Africa, his cast 
is somewhat "native" — Franklyn Moon 
was born there and his father, a mission- 
ary, is still in Africa; Bill Bouchey trav- 
eled the banks of the Congo as an oil 
prospector. 



When you hear Jack Ross on NBC 
creations from Chicago, maybe you don't 
know that he started in radio some six 
years ago heading the Ranch Boys on 
KTM, which is now KEHE in Los An- 
geles. No drugstore cowhand, Jack rode 
the range around Oracle, Arizona, a few 
months ago, with his wife and family, he 
took the trip east for larger radio fields 
to conquer and has made good . . . songs 
of the rangelands and wide open spaces, 
but not hill billy ballads sung through the 
nose. 

KMTR's newest baritone is Peter Kent, 
of the Winchester, Va., Kents. Now 
twenty-four, he was graduated from Wil- 
liams College, in Massachusetts, and fin- 
ished his musical education in Nice. While 
at Williamstown, he led the college glee 

club. 

* * * 

Bill Botzer, tall and slim, is the new- 
est voice on KJR in Seattle. Last fall he 
got his A.B. from the University of 
Washington and during the next three 
years he will be studying, while not oh 
the air, for LLB honors. The radio job, 
came to him largely as a result of his 
being on the University's debating team — 
station officials heard his well selected 
tonal qualities and practically perfect 
diction. All of which is a good-sized hint 
for aspiring radio men. 



is 

a 
d 



1 



ALONG RADIO ROW 



society hostess heard on Columbia who 
failed in several attempts to secure a 
divorce in New York state, is now trying 
the Reno-way? 

His mother heretofore exploited as first 
in Little Jackie Heller's affections seems 
to be losing out to Dixie Dunbar, the 
actorine. Are Freddie Rich, the conduc- 
tor, and Benay Venuta, the warbler, 
serious? Ditto Cyril Pitts, the tenor, and 
Joan Blaine, the radio actress? And 
here's a hot one: Al Shayne recently cele- 
brated the fifth anniversary of his di- 
vorce by throwing a party at a New York 
night club for Cecile Clancy, his ex- 
Missus! 

The amicable agreement entered into 
between Arthur (Street Singer) Tracy 
and his estranged wife, the former Bea- 
trice Margel, didn't jell and she is now 
suing him for divorce in the New York 
Supreme Court ... Mrs. Donald Novis, 
successful in her action for separation 
(Continued on page 88) 



LIGHTS 




Ned Tollinger, of Carefree Carnival, 
is about ready to give Helen Troy the 
gong, or what have you there, Ned? 

Bring out the proverbial "chip off the 
old block" slug for this paragraph. Eddie 
Fitzpatrick, Jr., is now directing his own 
ork from a remote line to NBC in the 
bay district. A busy lad, this youngster, 
for he directs, toots the trumpet and 
makes his own orchestrations. Oldsters in 
radio listening will well and favorably re- 
call his dad, who directed an NBC or- 
chestra a long while on the Woman's 
Magazine of the Air and other programs. 

* * * 

KHJ's most popular bachelor these 
days is twenty-two-year-old Buddy Gately, 
who was christened Robert back in Chi- 
cago . . . finally going to the University 
of Minnesota and then to Hollywood two 
or three years ago to be on the KFWB 
Hi-jinks, at that time a local radio high- 
light program. Though a tenor, Buddy 
reads detective yarns, goes to prize 
fights, plays tennis and swims. 

* * * 

NBC's Hollywood big shot, John Swal- 
low, ex-newshound, has quite a reputation 
for efficiency. While he dictates in the 
office he also shaves himself with one of 
those electric razors. But I was surprised 
the other day, while having breakfast with 
him on the RKQ lot, to find he is read- 
ing "Anthony (Continued on page 75) 



AND HIPS 
IN TEN DAYS 

with the 

PERFOLASTIC GIRDLF 

or it won't cost 
you one cent ! 




"I really felt better, my 
bacU no longer ached, 
and I had a new feeling 
of energy". 



"Jean, that 's wonderful, 
'II send for my girdle 
today!" 



You Can TEST the 

PERFOLASTIC GIRDLE and BRASSIERE 
For 10 DAYS at our expense! 



<M 



E WANT YOU to try the 
Perfolastic Girdle and Uplift 
Brassiere. Test them for yourself 
for 10 days absolutely FREE. 
Then, if you have not reduced at 
least 3 inches around waist and 
hips, they will cost you nothing! 

THE MASSAGE-LIKE ACTION 

REDUCES QUICKLY, EASILY, and 

SAFELY 

■ The massage-like action of these 
famous Perfolastic Reducing Gar- 
ments takes the place of months of 
tiring exercises. It removes surplus 
fat and stimulates the body once 
more into energetic health. 

KEEPS YOUR BODY COOL AND 
FRESH 

■ The ventilating perforations 
allow the skin pores to breathe 
normally. The inner surface of 
the Perfolastic is a delightfully 
soft, satinized fabric, especially 
designed to wear next to the 
body. It does away with all 
irritation, chafing and discomfort, 
keeping your body cool and fresh 



at all times. A special adjustable 
back allows for perfect fit as 
inches disappear. 

HThe Perfolastic Girdle and Brassiere 
knead away the fat at only those places 
where vou want to reduce, in order to 
regain your youthful slimness. Beware of 
reducing agents that take the weight off 
the entire body . . . for a scrawny neck and 
face are as unattractive as a too-fat figure. 

SEND FOR 10-DAY FREE TRIAL 
OFFER 

| You can prove to yourself quickly and 
definitely whether or not this very efficient 
girdle and brassiere will reduce you. You 
do not need to risk one penny . . . try them 
for 10 days ... at our expense! 

Don't wait any longer . . . act today ! 

4 *m* » 

PERFOLASTIC, Inc. 

41 EAST 42nd ST., Dept. 2811, NEW YORK, N. Y 
Without obligation on my part, please send me 
FREE booklet describing and illustrating the new 
Perfolastic Girdle and Brassiere, also sample of 
perforated rubber and particulars of your 
10-DAY FREE TRIAL OFFER! 

Name 

Address 

City State 

H Use Coupon or send Name and Address on Post Care 





BEGINNING THE BACK-STAGE STORY OF MICKEY 
CRAIL AND TAD BYRON, TWO KIDS WHOSE THIRST 
FOR ADVENTURE PLUNGES THEM INTO THE MAGIC 
EXCITING, BEWILDERING WORLD OF RADIO 



T^^T OT even Hollywood could have equalled the 

r^M scene that met Mickey and Tad when they 

walked into the studio, their faces flushed with 

the thrill of the moment, and found two empty chairs. 

More than a hundred others were already grouped in 
twos and threes, talking in nervous bursts of conversa- 
tion, at their sides every type of musical instrument 
known to man. Broom handles with violin strings, a 
row of shining silver spoons, another row of polished 
tumblers, saws that bent nearly double. 

A stocky, red-faced man walked on the stage of the 
studio. In the faces that turned toward him he read 
the inevitable finale to all this — laughter and tears, 
young hope and worn despair. He smiled and cleared 
his throat. 

"Before we start, I want to explain that I'll be in the 
control room you see at the left. When I call your 
name through the loudspeaker take your place on the 
stage. There's a studio pianist, if you want to use her." 

He paused, smiled again, and left. 

it was a large studio that- Mickey Crail and Tad 
Byron were in — the largest that Radio City boasted. 
Almost austere in its furnishings, it was nevertheless 
impressive. Row upon row of folding steel chairs were 
provided for the fifteen hundred people who gathered 
here every night in the week to watch their favorite 
programs. Tonight, with colorful pageantry, Show. 
Boat would broadcast from this same stage. 

Mickey took Tad's hand. "I'm scared," she whis- 
pered. 

Tad laughed. "Listen, little one, when it's time to 
be scared, I'll let you know. This isn't half as bad as 
the day Colgate was ahead six to nothing with only 
two minutes to go. Remember?" 

Mickey felt her courage returning. Tad was right. 
He was always right in a moment like this. She sat 
back and her heart moved down from her throat to its 
natural position. 

It was really funny, more than anything else. Ten days 
ago, she had never dreamed that she would be leaving 
Poughkeepsie. Not until a letter had come to her father 
from Uncle Jim Riley, saying that he had arranged to have 
Mickey audition for his amateur hour. She wouldn't have 
gone then, if Tad hadn't decided it for her. 

"Why New York's only a stone's throw away," he had 
told her. 

'Maybe a giant's throw," she had answered, but she'd 
packed her suitcase and left, anyway. 

A voice boomed through the loudspeaker on the stage — 
Uncle Jim's voice. "Loretta Waldin," it called. Mickey 
stared at the frail woman who got up and took her place at 
a microphone near the stage piano. She began to sing and 
Mickey knew she would never make the grade. 

Halfway through the song, the voice cut her off. "Thank 
you, that's all. I'll let you know if we want you. Next — 
Jeff Bowers." A lanky, sunburned cowboy who walked as 
though he'd never been off a horse, took the place of the 
other. In his hands was a Jew's harp. He began to play. 

12 



By FRED SAMMIS 




Tad bent down to Mickey's ear. "He's better than the 
woman. Bet you he's one of the winners." 

Mickey shivered a little. Until now it had all been a 
lark, almost a weekend excursion, this auditioning in New 
York for the King James gasoline amateur hour. But sud- 
denly she wanted to be one of those chosen for Sunday 
night's broadcast, wanted to go on a network of radio 
stations that stretched from Radio City to the southern 
tip of California — wanted it so much it was a physical 
pain. 

The cowboy finished. As he walked towards his seat, a 
page in a gold braided uniform more elaborate than the 
dress of the king's guards left the glass panelled room in 
which Uncle Jim was listening and stopped him. Mickey 
could hear what he said. "Please wait until the others have 
auditioned." Tad had won his bet. The cowboy was one 
of the chosen few. 

"Next — Byron and Crail." 

Tad dragged Mickey to her feet, led her up on the stage. 
"Easy, honey," he said, "nothing to get excited about." 

Mickey waved the pianist aside and struck the opening 
chords of "Down By the Old Mill Stream." Her voice. 



clear and true, picked up the melody. Tad whistled in per- 
fect accompaniment, then began the novelty that had 
brought him to New York, to this audition. He imitated 
bird calls, first the meadowlark, then the thrush, and as a 
finale, the nightingale. 

Scattered applause from the other amateurs brought a 
wide grin to Tad's lips. When they sat down again, he pat- 
ted Mickey's shoulder. 

"I told you we could do it. It's a cinch, not half as hard 
as keeping a bunch of fraternity men quiet." 

"Sure." Mickey nodded. "Didn't the class vote you the 
boy with the most promising future?" 

"Lay off, mugg," Ted growled, but Mickey knew he was 
pleased. 

She wished she could be as confident as Tad. But always 
she'd been the one who looked before she leaped. When 
Tad leaped, blindly, it was with the assurance and grace 
of a young Greek god. The 
worst part of it was, he never 
failed to land upright, on 
both feet. He might have 
tripped, once or twice, but 
Mickey was always there 
with a helping-hand. 



fiHE supposed that was the 
basis -of their friend- 
ship. Everything about them 
was in perfect contrast. They 
made a fashionable pair. 
Mickey who had to rely on 
French heels to raise her over 
five feet and Tad who tipped 
six even on those rare occa- 
sions when he found time to 
comb his hair down flat. 

Another funny thing about 
them — any other couple 
would have been in love by 
this time. But Mickey and 
Tad had been too busy hav- 
ing a good time to do any- 
thing silly like that. If they'd 
been in love, they'd never 
have been auditioning for an 

amateur program in Radio City. Engaged couples don't go 
traveling together from one town to another. They wait 
until they get married, and then it's too late. 

At least it usually is, Mickey reflected, trying to look 
nonchalant in her tweed suit that set off sparkling black 
eyes and stubborn black curls that fell across her white 
forehead in defiance of waves and bobby pins. 

She'd be feeling a lot more sure that Byron and Crail 
were winners, if only Uncle Jim had spoken to her before 
the auditions had begun. After all, he and Mickey's father, 
Ade Crail, had been partners together in vaudeville at the 
beginning of the century. But no word had come from the 
master of ceremonies since the letter setting today as the 
date of the tryout. 

Tad was growing impatient. "Why don't we hear some- 
thing?" he complained. "Don't tell me the great Tad 
Byron has muffed!" 

Any retort Mickey might have made was cut short by 
the appearance of the same page in the same glittering 
uniform. 

"Uncle Jim would like to see you after the auditions," he 
intoned with bored politeness which retreated before Tad's 
wild whoop of glee and Mickey's gasp of pleasure that 
escaped her cupped hands. 

"What did I tell you!" Tad gloated, more than handsome 
in the first flush of victory. If Mickey hadn't seized the 
folding chair she was sitting on, he would have done a 
highland fling with her then and there. 

14 



"Mickey couldn't go on past that word. Love? 
But she must love Tad to suffer this terrible fear 
of having him escape her! The whole significance 
of their trip to New York weighed down on her. 
Tad might be beginning a career that would 
leave an impassable gulf between them. And 
what possible right had she to stay at his side?" 



Don't fail to read the thrilling story of Mickey 
Crail and Tad Byron, "Amateurs At Life," which 
takes you behind the exciting scenes of radio- 
land. If you haven't started it, turn back this 
page and begin an absorbing tale of adventure 
and love. You'll want to read it to the end! 



The wait was easy after that. Mickey spent the time try- 
ing to puncture the inflated balloon of Tad's ego and hiding 
the joy that was surging through her veins. 

When the last amateur was through, Byron and Crail 
followed the page to an anteroom, one wall of which was 
heavy, leaded glass looking out on an empty studio that 
in a few hours would be filled to overflowing with gum- 
chewing, intense spectators. 

Mickey recognized Uncle Jim the moment she closed the 
door behind her. He was just like the pictures her father 
kept on his dresser at home — a wild mane of snowy white 
hair, cheeks that held the ruddiness of late fall apples, an 
expression that in repose could be grim and foreboding, 
but which now had lost its shadows in a welcoming smile. 

"Mickey Crail!" He came from behind a polished desk 
with outstretched hands. "You haven't changed since you 
were three years old and wouldn't eat your spinach." 

"I've grown two feet, eat 
spinach, and use lipstick," she 
retorted, her instinct telling 
her that she liked this man 
whose amateur hour was the 
biggest sensation radio had 
produced since Eddie Can- 
tor's debut, back in 1931. 

She pointed at Tad. "Meet 
the weaker half of the team 
of Byron and Crail, Tad 
Byron." 

"How do you do, young 
man? You'll be glad to 
know that we liked your 
whistling," Uncle Jim said. 

"Don't tell him that," 
Mickey begged, "he's always 
winning some prize and he 
never gives me credit for 
coaching him. And I al- 
ready have a bone to pick 
with you. Why did you wait 
until now to speak to your 
old friend's daughter?" 

The older man's smile 
faded for a fleeting second. 
"Because I didn't want any- 
one to know that I was pulling for you. There were three 
others listening to the auditions. There was an executive 
from the gasoline company, an official from NBC, and a 
vice president of the advertising agency that runs this 
show." He grinned again. "I don't think I'd have seen you 
at all, if they hadn't been unanimous in choosing you two." 
"Then we won?" Tad turned a superior smile on his 
partner. "You heard the gentleman say he liked my whist- 
ling. Does that prove anything to you?" 

Mickey groaned. "You see, Uncle Jim? It's always like 
that. Dad's warned me against him and I think he's right." 

y% FTER they left and were in the deeply carpeted hall. 
"^^ lined with smaller studios as close together as cell blocks, 
and just about as hard to get into, Tad had a suggestion. 

"Let's go on an unescorted tour of Radio City! None of 
this lecture business. If anyone stops us, we'll just say 
that we're performers on the King James gasoline program." 

Without waiting for Mickey's assent, he started off, pull- 
ing her after him, still too stunned by the fact that they 
were going on Sunday night's show, to protest. 

Their first stop was the indirectly lighted main reception 
room for the eighth floor. Musicians with horns, drums, and 
violins ran back and forth, in and out of studios. Slumped 
down in leather davenports, men and women pored over 
scripts, arguing and changing with scribbled penciling. 

With a wave of his hand, Tad said, "There's a favorite of 
yours." Mickey followed his gaze. (Continued on page 63) 



ILLUSTRATION BY COLE BRADLEY 




Behind 
closed ijoors 



SCOOP! GET ON THE INSIDE 



TRACK AND LEARN WHAT 



RADIO HAS IN STORE FOR YOU! 



WITHOUT benefit of the magic crystal, a white tur- 
ban, or mystic incantations, we're about to dip 
into the top hat and draw out — not a white rab- 
bit, but as complete a listing as we can make of what you 
can already find on your radio this month and what, in 
the coming months, warrants your personal attention to 
the loudspeaker. 

We don't have to cross our fingers and look behind us 
when we say that this will be a banner year. New faces, 
and old faces in new guises — new ideas, and old ideas in 
not such new guises — anyway, an assortment of entertain- 
ment only radio could possibly provide. But let's get 
started and see just why the 1935 to 1936 season promises 
to be the. most outstanding in the history of commercial 
broadcasting. 

First, for you radio fans who have been taking a vaca- 
tion from listening since your favorites deserted the air- 
waves, let's look over the list of returning comics. As far 
as we can see, and that's three feet on a clear day, Joe 



Penner, Beatrice Lillie, and Block and Sully are the only 
major catastrophes. 

Fred Allen will be with us, probably the second of Octo- 
ber, and if it will cheer you up, there's a chance that his 
amateurs won't be along on this Hour of Smiles. 

The biggest news, if it still is news, is the fact that when 
Jack Benny pops back into his old Sunday night spot, he 
will have a new band leader and a new singer. "Spats" 
Bestor and tenor Frank Parker are not included in the 
Benny plans. Instead, Johnny Green will be taken from 
CBS to fill the Bestor shoes and that movie fellow, Michael 
Bartlett, has been signed to fill Parker's. Green's music you 
probably know. Bartlett you may, if you recall that he 
plays opposite Grace Moore in "Love Me Forever." Not, 
incidentally, the gambler she loves in the end. 

The shortest explanation we can offer for the loss of 
Bestor and Parker is also the most logical. Appearing all 
this winter and spring on the air's most popular program 
built them, quite naturally, into stars in their own rights. 
They aren't supporting cast people any longer and so must 
have their own shows. Besides, they're more expensive this 
year. 

Then there's Eddie Cantor returning to CBS with 
Parkyakakas and Jimmy Wellington not far behind. 
Whether Rubinoff will wield his violin and trip over 
Cantor's subtleties we can't say off-hand. Tuesday 
nights, so far as it is safe to predict, will be graced once 
more by Ed Wynn, supported we suppose by Eddie Duchin. 

That old plantation menace, Walter "Pappy" O'Keefe 
will be back for Camels October first at nine o'clock (that's 
Eastern Standard time) and will (Continued on page 49) 

15 



Win some of the 



HERE'S a contest everyone can get into. Just select 
the best captions for seven scenes from Jack 
Benny's new M-G-M picture, "Broadway Melody 
of 1936," and then write part of the caption for 
the eighth scene in your own words. Five of the scenes 
and all of the captions appear this month. Two scenes to 
be captioned with sentences and the final scene for which 
you will write your own words will appear in the next 
issue. 

Your chance to win is excellent ! Read the rules carefully 
so that you know just how to compete, and then get busy. 
Study the five pictures. Then read the sentences from the 
dialogue. Select the one you think best fits the first picture. 



Then select one for the next picture, and so on until all five 
are captioned. Then put them aside until you have the 
final scenes in December RADIO MIRROR. 

It is not a requirement of this contest that you see Jack 
Benny in "Broadway Melody of 1936," although so doing 
may suggest to many Benny fans a choice of captions. 
However the non-movie-goer has equal opportunity to select 
the most appropriate sentence for each scene. 

Come on, Benny fans, radio fans, movie fans, and contest 
fans and start your claims to a share in the $500.00 prize 
fund. You can win as much as $200.00 by the simple 
process of writing down eight sentences. You can win 
$100.00 or any one of the sixty-five other cash awards. Don't 




scow 



** * yeTS ' 



Ho' 



.<•■' 









J* 



\** jTa* 






,>^V' 






Write or paste caption Aere 




Write or parte caption here 



Write or paite caption hwe: 



$500.00 ™ CASH 

PRIZES 



neglect this opportunity to add some extra cash to your 
budget! Caption this month's BROADWAY MELODY 
scenes and then watch for the last three in December 
RADIO MIRROR. 

Everybody who enters the contest gets a prize — a beau- 
tiful sepia print of Jack Benny, your radio and movie favorite. 



THE RULES 



1 



In November and December, RADIO MIRROR will 
publish a total of eight scenes from M-G-M's new 
Jack Benny picture, "Broadway Melody of 1 936." 

O To compete, clip or trace each of the first seven 
scenes and caption each with one of the seven 
sentences supplied from the dialogue of the show. 

2 Clip or trace the eighth scene and finish the caption, 
which will be a question from the show's dialogue, with 
a reply of your own composition. 

4 For the set of seven scenes most appropriately cap- 
tioned from among the supplied sentences accom- 
panied by the best original reply to the question under 
the eighth scene a First Prize of $200.00 will be awarded. 
For the next best entry $100.00 will be paid. Five $10.00 
Prizes, Ten $5.00 Prizes, and Fifty Prizes of $2.00 each will 
also be paid. In case of ties, duplicate awards will be 
paid. 

5 Wait until your set of eight scenes is complete before 
sending an entry. All entries must be received on 

or before Tuesday, December 10, 1935, the closing date 
of this contest. 

A Submit all entries to Broadway Melody of 1936 Con- 
test, RADIO MIRROR, P. O. Box 556, Grand Central 
Station, New York, N. Y. 

"J Anyone may compete except employees of Mac- 
fadden Publications, Inc., and M-G-M, and members 
of their families. 



FIRST PRIZE $200.00 

SECOND PRIZE.... 100.00 

FIVE PRIZES, Each $1 0.00 50.00 

TEN PRIZES, Each $5.00 50.00 

FIFTY PRIZES, Each $2.00 1 00.00 

TOTAL 67 PRIZES $500.00 

(AND A PRIZE FOR EVERY CONTESTANT 
—A FINE PORTRAIT OF JACK BENNY) 

GET IN ON THE BIG "BROADWAY 
MELODY OF 1936"-RADIO MIR- 
ROR CONTEST AND WIN BIG 
MONEY FOR CAPTIONING SCENES 
FROM JACK BENNY'S SMASHING 
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER FILM 





WE have five radios in 
the house. I have a 
big one in my living 
room and one in the down- 
stairs playroom. My maids 
have one. And there are two 
small receivers between three 
children, while a sixth which 
was in the downstairs bed- 
room has just been sent to 
camp. Also, my older son has 
one at school ! 

The pulse of my family life 
beats to the rhythm of radio! 
And my spare time is so 
limited and I go out so rarely, 

comparatively speaking, that next to reading, radio must 
supply the major portion of my relaxation and entertain- 
ment. And it does so without effort on my part. Radio 
requires a minimum of physical exertion and supplies the 
stimulation and up-to-the minute information which is vital 
in my particular profession. I sometimes even turn on the 
radio when I'm writing, because music does not in the least 
distract me. (But morning programs are so apt to be in- 
terspersed with recipes that I find myself describing my 
heroine's eyes as the color of old-fashioned potato salad, 
which wouldn't do at all! So I turn it off.) 

Although I have less leisure for listening I believe I am 
at home more than the busiest housewife! 

So the editor of Radio Mirror has suggested that you 
and I check up on our likes and dislikes. In telling you 
what radio means to me, I'm going to break down and 
frankly confess my preferences and prejudices, letting the 
chips of disagreement fall where they may. 

I wonder how you and I do check up — ? 

Well, here goes — 

Among the popular orchestras I rate Wayne King's high- 
est, perhaps because I like slow music, minors, waltzes. 
Nevertheless I think that there is too much advertising on 
his program. It breaks the mood. I am free to confess 
that I always turn the dials and tune it out. 

I am very fond of Lombardo's music. I have liked that 
of Eddie Duchin. 

Any time gypsy music is advertised on a program I dial 
in. And I am a pushover for the organ. Unfortunately 
some of the best organ music programs are broadcast too 
late at night for me to hear them. I like marimbas and 
alleged Hawaiian music — I think this taste is a hangover 
from adolescence. 

I despise all hot music, I do not like harmony singers, 
not even the best, and orchestrations which distort the orig- 
inal melody out of all semblance to its original conception, 

18 



WHAT RADIO 
MEANS TO 

By FAITH BALDWIN 



EXCLUSIVELY FOR RADIO MIRROR, THE POPULAR 



NOVELIST FRANKLY CONFESSES HER RADIO LIKES 



AND DISLIKES. DO YOU AGREE WITH THEM ? 



if there is any melody, irritate me beyond words. 

I listen, of course, to the Vallee hour but find it very 
uneven. I enjoy Mr. Vallee's singing style less than I used 
to, when it was new and we were younger and he was sing- 
ing on programs more obscure than his present offering. 
I've always liked Tom Howard but I tire of him easily and 
if I am not feeling exactly up to mark he makes me pe- 
culiarly nervous. As for the rest of Mr. Vallee's guest stars, 
sometimes they are good and sometimes they are not, ac- 
cording to my way of thinking anyway. Now and then he 
puts on an excellent program ; and other nights I find them 
very dull indeed. 

I have always liked Lanny Ross. I think he has a de- 
lightful voice and a very pleasant manner. So far, however, 
his State Fair has not particularly interested me, except 
when he is singing. I grow bored with this question and 
answer business and find the background atmosphere much 
ado about nothing. 

I have not as yet heard Uncle Charlie's Tent Show. I 
shall sit up some night as late as ten o'clock in order to 
do^so! I enjoyed Show Boat very much when Charles Win- 
ninger conducted that old craft. This is partly personal 
prejudice because I used to know Mr. Winninger very well 
and I've always liked him enormously. During his cap- 
taining of Show Boat I regretted very much that he was 
not permitted to do a lot of singing. Later, on the program 
with which he followed Show Boat — I have forgotten the 
name — he did sing. He sang a song one night which I had 
heard him sing over ten years ago at the old piano in my 
father's house on Long Island. And how he put it over! 

I like Al Goodman's orchestra and I am very sold on 
Ethel Merman; I listened to her program series from start, 
to finish. Now and then her choice of songs did not interest 
me but then I have never fallen for the torch variety of 
popular music. But if anyone could convert me to it, it 
would be Miss Merman. 






WN comedy programs my special favorite is Jack Benny 
and his haywire crew. I like 'em all. They tickle me 
to death. The program is always funny, it is — much as I 
dislike to mention it — clean, the music is good, and I even 
like the advertising; there is plenty of it but it is never 
irritating. I'm sorry to learn from your editor that Don 
Bestor and Frank Parker are not with Jack this fall! 

Of course, I am faithful to Burns and Allen. Gracie and 
George are old radio friends and certainly brighten the 
corner where they are. I have never been able to drum up 
a similar enthusiasm for Block and Sully. And now and 
then I tune in on Pick and Pat — or shall we say Molasses 
and January? — and they do not fail me. I followed the 
Aces evening after evening and liked them even better 
when they got away from bridge which, thank heaven, I 
do not play. But since they are no longer on in the evening, 
1 miss them. I also confess to a leaning toward Budd and 
Stoopnagle. Their idiocies never pall. 

Although I do not listen to serial stories as a rule, I pick 
one up now and then and have enjoyed several instalments 
of Dangerous Paradise — principally, I 
think, because I do like the voices. As 
for Amos 'n' Andy, I listen to them 
for a stretch and then cease to listen. 
No particular reason. It depends on 
what they are doing at the moment. I 
haven't listened recently so I've missed 
the addition to their two-some. I'll 
have to get a load of the lady and see 
if I approve. 

I have a soft spot in my heart for 
Crumit and Sanderson. 1 like Doody's 
voice and her little laugh and I like 
Frank's voice and his casual friendly 
ways. I don't suppose the continuity is 
especially good, but I am fond of the 
stars. I listened to them on the Black- 
stone series and now with Bond Bread. 
They are very pleasant people to know 
over the air. And I remember them 
both on the stage. 

I listen, too, to the Grand Hotel 
hour. This is very uneven. The actors 
are, I feel, uniformly good but the 
plays are not. They are good, bad and 
indifferent. And there is a good deal of 
advertising. 

The one dramatic offering which 
seems to be always very good is the 
Lux Theater of the Air. When there is 
a difference it lies with the actors. 
Some of the (Continued on page 56) 



Miss Baldwin thinks 
that Rudy Vallee's 
programs are un- 
even — but she 
listens to them! 



^ 



Lanny Ross's voice 
the writer finds 
delightful but, oh, 
State Fair's ques- 
tions and answers! 



.\ Y 



< 






- '" :J:i 



There's a soft spot in 
the novelist's heart for 
Crumit and Sanderson 

tin circle); and below, 
.owell Thomas is a habit 
with her. That's Junior. 









^ 






J 



f^_ 



V 



i I f . 





J 



Photos made exclusively for Radio Mirror by Wide World 



They were popular out California way for six 
years, and now they have taken over the New 
York studios with their music and gay laughter. 
Top, leader of the gang, Al Pearce, watching 
"The Three Cheers" to the accompaniment of 
Tony Romano's guitar. Above, Mabel Todd, 
APs "Little Ray of Sunshine." The man with the 
mustache is Morey Amsterdam, who greets you 
over the air with "You lucky people!" Left, 
Arlene Harris, the comedienne with the world's 
greatest gift o' gab. For Al Pearce and his 
Gang program, see page 52 — 2 o'clock column. 







SPOT 



MANY RADIO PF ISOMERS HAVE GONE WEST 

rOF THE CURIOUS PREDICAMENT THAT 

THEM-AMATEURS WHO MUST BE STARS! 

WHITELY FLETCHER 



HOLLYWOOD . is putting the 
radio stars on the spot. This 
past summer, for instance, a 
dozen or more stars have been in the 
movie studios. A dozen or more 
frightened stars, hoping for the best 
but not sure from anxious moment to 
anxious moment how things were go- 
ing to turn out. Whether they were 
forging stardom in another field or 
jeopardizing the bright fame they 
already had on the air waves. 

Consider for one minute the pre- 
dicament of the radio stars whose 
songs and gaiety and good-humored 
fun have gone out over the air to root 
them in the affections of hundreds of 
thousands. And to invest their names 
with such drawing power that Holly- 
wood has beckoned to them with 
golden, Lorelei fingers that it would 
not be human to ignore. 

West they traveled, the radio stars. 
By plane and train and ship. Frances 
Langford, Gladys Swarthout, Jack 
Benny, Lily Pons, James Melton, 
Fred Allen, Ramona, Rubinoff, Ever- 
ett Marshall and others. Following in 
the frightened, apprehensive footsteps 
of others who had gone before them — 
some to find success and others to fail 
and be humiliated. Among these Ruth 
Etting, Lanny Ross, Amos and Andy, 
Rudy Vallee, Ed Wynn and more. 

M-G-M photo 

Hollywood Hotel's Frances Langford 
couldn't eat or sleep during the mak- 
ing of "Broadway Melody of 1936." 

21 



They knew, every one of these 
radio stars in the Hollywood 
studios, that they must be good. 
They realized that the produc- 
tions in which they would be 
featured and starred represented 
investments of many thousands 
of dollars. More personal and 
more important to them was the 
fear that if now they should ap- 
pear to disadvantage the public 
who loved them unseen might 
turn from them. Actually then, 
every last one of them, in reach- 
ing for this second star, was 
risking the star rights he al- 
ready had. Besides, the cards 
were stacked against them. For 
without any real chance to find 
their way or serve a necessary 
apprenticeship in this new me- 
dium they must step right into 
the spotlight. Amateurs, in 
other words, they must be stars! 

There was Frances Langford, 
like a little frightened kitten. 
So terrified. Sitting at her first 
Hollywood interview with tears 
— nervous tears — brimming in 
her eyes. 

The night before she reported 
for her first day's work at M- 
G-M in "Broadway Melody of 
1936" seemed to Frances the 
longest span of dark hours she 
ever had known. And yet as the 
luminous hands of her bedside 
clock reached six o'clock she 
would have liked to turn them 
back. At six she must get up in 
order to be at the studios and 
make up, ready for her first 
days work, at nine. It isn't ex- 
aggerating at all to say she was 
like a queen about to face the 
tribunal which would decide 
whether she must lose her 
crown, the crown she loved and 
had for years worked hard to 
earn and serve, or gain a new 
crown. 

Frances' fingers trembled as 
she put on the make-up in the 
way the studio make-up expert 
had instructed her to do. She 
smoothed the pale tan grease 
paint over the deep circles her 
sleepless, tossing hours had 
sunk in her usually smooth 
young face. 

Her manager tapped on her dressing-room door. He had 
come to take her down to the set. 

"If I don't get it right," she asked with her fear staring 
out of her eyes, "if I'm slow to please the director, will he 
yell at me? In front of everyone?" 

And it was then her maid, fastening up her dress, no- 
ticed it had grown too large for her. In the few weeks 
since it had been made she had lost weight, although she 
had been instructed to put weight on, because she was too 
nervous and concerned to eat at all. 

She walked on the set beside her manager. Quietly. 

"Isn't it marvelous," someone said to her, "that you aren't 
at all nervous!" 

22 




HBHI 



Paramount photo 



Frances smiled, then turned quickly as that smile 
trembled on her lips and there was once more a quick rush 
of tears in her eyes. 

"The love scene I did with George Raft in 'Every Night 
at Eight' was the most difficult of all," Frances told me. "I 
knew how that scene should be done. I knew how impetu- 
ous that girl should be in her caresses once she discovered 
the man she loved loved her. But when I put my arms 
about George they were strange and stiff. And then that 
stiffness took possession of my entire body. 

"We had to take that scene over and over. Until finally 
it was a matter of my cold fear melting in the warmth of 
everyone's utter kindness." 



1 






Warner photos 




M-G-M photo 



l 



Over at Warner Brothers studios they talk of the first day James 
Melton, who has charmed you in Palmolive programs, reported for 
work in "Stars Over Broadway." Jimmy never has known mike 
fright. Always he's been so wrapped up in his singing, in feeling his 
notes come warm and full from his throat, that nothing else mattered. 

He began his first song easily enough. But when he saw the great 
camera focused on him, things changed. Harmless enodgh in itself, 
that camera, but menacing to his professional well-being in that it 
would record pictures of him that would be flung on screens all over 
the country and challenge his admirers: "Here's the man you think 
so grand. Sure you like him? Pleased? Disappointed?" 

Jimmy was on the spot. And Jimmy knew it. He couldn't even 
speak. His lines crowded in his throat to {Continued on page 67) 



Opposite page, Gladys Swarthout says it 
was the heat wave in Hollywood which 
saved her. Upper circle, Everett Marshall 
couldn't sing a note until the director hit 
upon an idea. Lower circle, can you pic- 
ture James Melton trembling with fear? 
And upper corner, Lily Pons wanted to run 
away while she still had time. Above, 
Jack Benny (with Mary Livingstone and 
Una Merkel, right) tells you the reason the 
stars must take their chances in movies. 



23 



THE 





JOHNNY HAMP'S SOCIALITE KAYE KERNAN 



LEARN TO KNOW 

MORE OF YOUR FAVORITE SINGERS, ANNOUNCERS AND COMEDIANS 







Above, Kaye Kernan was a Cincinnati society girl not long 
ago and looks it. She made her radio debut in January, 
1934, has been singing with the Johnny Hamp orchestra for 
some time now. Before she entered radio she appeared in 
amateur theatricals and studied voice at the Cincinnati Con- 
servatory of Music, just to make sure of a job. Her looks led 
to her getting work as a professional model about two years 
ago. . . . Gale Page, left, sings from Chicago, but until 1933 
she had lived all of her life on the West Coast. Born in 
Spokane, in 1910, she went to a private school in California 
where she learned to play the piano, tennis and backgammon. 
Dancing is her favorite amusement and she hates bridges. 
Laziness is her worst trait, she says. Admits a preference to- 
wards blonds of the opposite sex, being brunette herself. 
Last year she was featured in the Palmer House and Climalene 
shows, just two weeks after NBC had signed her. . . . Below, 
Jean Paul King, whose fan mail (answered by himself) warrants 
his sharing the title of Chicago's favorite announcer with Pat 
Flanagan. He was born in North Bend, Nebraska, a son of a 
Methodist preacher. He attended the University of Washing- 
ton and was active in glee club, varsity baseball and acting. 
Later, he played stock in San Francisco, then joined staff of 
NBC Pacific division. Made his radio debut in San Francisco. 



, 



£\S. 



m 



MB 









X" 



FIBBER McGEE AND MOLLY SOLOIST 



CHICAGO'S OWN JEAN PAUL KING 



® ^ 



-yl 




) 



REVELERS AND BOSS BLACK 



GULF'S HALLIE STILES 



MARTY MAY 

AND 

STOOGE 



J 




Hallie Stiles, above, is known in Paris as the American 
darling of the "Opera Comique." Her girlhood was 
spent in Syracuse, New York. Light complexioned, 
with blue eyes, but brunette. . . . Above, left, the 
Revelers — Robert Simmons, Lewis James, Wilfred 
Glenn and Elliot Shaw — with Frank Black at the piano. 
Simmons, top tenor, was born in Missouri, turned to 
radio at the suggestion of Richard Crooks. James, 
second tenor, is from Michigan, has sung with the New 
York Philharmonic. Glenn, basso, was born in Cali- 
fornia, has been a cowpuncher. Shaw was born in 
Iowa, sang soprano at age of twelve. Black is NBC's 
general musical director. . . . Left, Marty May and 
Carol Dee, CBS's sustaining contribution to summer 
comedy. May is a vaudeville favorite. . . . Below, left, 
Jimmy Farrell, who sings on Johnny Green's Socony 
show. Debut came on Kate Smith hour. . . . Below, 
Lysbeth Hughes, singing harpist with Horace Heidt. 
Her first job was playing harp in a fashion show. 



SKETCHBOOK'S JIMMY FARRELL 



ALEMITE'S HORACE HEIDT HARPIST 




THE 



BROADWAY'S FAMOUS GRANLUND 



OFFERING YOU 

MORE PICTURES AND STORIES OF THE RADIO STARS YOU LISTEN TO 



Above, Nils T. Sranlund — N. T. G. to all of Broadway — is a veteran 
of radio and returns to the air as master of ceremonies for Bromo- 
Seltzer Tuesday nights on NBC. Six feet tall, lean and spare, he is 
a familiar sight to chorus girls whom he's hired by the hundreds. 
Scores of the famous have started with him . . . Joe Emerson (left) 
has been an early morning favorite of WLW's listeners for over a 
year, singing the hymns of all churches. Shortly his songs go on a 
network of stations. He is married to a school-day chum . . . Be- 
low, left, Wanda Edwards, only seventeen and yet the favorite 
singer at Station WCKY, Cincinnati. Wanda was born in Indiana. 
She's been heard by NBC audiences in the program, Happy Days 
in Dixie. Is now featured on WCKY's Youth Parade and a weekly 
show, Tommy and Wanda . . . Kurt Brownell, below, is heard twice 
a week on NBC's Blue network. Born near Chicago, Kurt sprang 
into musical prominence when he was called upon to sing the role 
of Walther in "Die Meistersinger" during the Damrosch Jubilee. 





WCKY'S FAVORITE SONGSTRESS 



SUSTAINING STAR BROWNELL 





PALMOLIVES THEODORE WEBB 



Theodore Webb (above) is featured almost 
weekly on Palmolive's Music Box — Friday nights 
— now on a Blue network. He first learned the 
value of good singing in school when he earned 
a high rating report card by filling the teacher's 
request for a certain song. In high school he 
dropped all music study in favor of athletics. At 
seventeen music reclaimed him and he developed 
an excellent musical memory by singing, upon 
his return home, melodies he heard at concerts. 
His first appearance in radio was over WJZ 
when that station was first opened . . . Right, 
she came out of the West, tall, athletic, smiling, 
auditioned, and began singing this spring on 
John Charles Thomas' new program. Willie 
Morris was born twenty-four years ago and got 
her name because her parents were hoping for 
a baby boy and had already named it William. 




Born in Milwaukee, July 26, 1883, Walter Blaufuss (below, lead- 
ing the Yawners) had been conducting bands ever since he 
entered medical school. In 1911 he organized the Blaufuss Band 
and played in Chicago, New York and Pittsburgh. He has com- 
posed many songs, the two most outstanding of which are: 
"Your Eyes Have Told Me So" and "My Isle of Golden Dreams." 
Today he is one of NBC's outstanding conductors, directing the 
music for The Breakfast Club; National Farm and Home Hour. 



4 £i 



THE BREAKFAST CLUB WITH WALTER BLAUFUSS 



J L 



*~> 



J0 ^ 





DON'T KNOW 



WHY WAS VICTOR YOUNG 
AFRAID TO WORK WITH AL 
JOLSON ON SHELL CHATEAU? 
READ THE DETAILS OF RADIO'S 
STRANGEST INSIDE STORY! 



WHEN Al jolson and Victor Young were 
signed to appear together on the pretentious 
Shell Chateau broadcasts, all radio row 
seethed with malicious gossip ! Rumors, some of them 
libelously false, spread like measles through the cor- 
ridors of the National Broadcasting Company. 

It was like playing with fire, radio people insisted, 
putting two temperamental artists on the same show. 
What would happen when their tempers, like flames 
from acetylene torches, exploded? It happened once 
before. It could happen again. 

Two years ago the two men had first met. It ended 
disastrously. Al was singing on the old Kraft pro- 
gram. Victor was arranging exotic Lee Wiley's song 
numbers for the show. Al liked these arrangements 
and asked Paul Whiteman if he knew who composed 
them. 

"The little fellow at the piano," answered the rajah 
of rhythms. Al immediately asked Victor to do some 
for him. Victor quoted his price and Al's jaws 
dropped. "What?" snapped Al. "Other guys are 
only too glad to write for me for nothing." 

No wonder the two parted in opposite directions 
of Radio City! 

On the surface it looked as if the second encounter 
"between Ambitious Al and Vitriolic Victor would be 
something no radio enthusiast would want to miss. 
As for the sponsors, they would have their hands full. 

But underneath this belligerent amalgamation de- 
veloped a story never before told: the inside drama 
of the unusual relationship between Al Jolson. star 
maker and breaker, and Victor Young, a stocky, wil- 
ful little man who didn't know the word quit. 

When Victor Young got word that he had won 
the laborious job of being Al Jolson's musical direc- 
tor, he wasn^t thrilled. He was afraid! 

"Of all the radio stars in the business," he moaned, 
"I had to get Jolson. He's too darned tempera- 
mental." 

While Victor was preparing himself for the ordeal, 

the bronzed grand-daddy of popular songs was 

zooming east in a fast Boeing 

plane, excited and confident 

In 1916 he had licked the 

caustic theater managers who for She ". < Z haf ^".\ 

a j » u- • • J li a sponsored by Shell 

scoffed at his inimitable de- q U Co $ee poge S4 

livery. In 1927 he had revolu- — 9 o'clock column. 



THE HALF OF IT/ 



By LESTER GOTTLIEB 



tionized the movie industry with a masterful perform- 
ance in "The Jazz Singer." He had taught the state 
of California how to use its mouth and throat. He 
was now ready to prove to 120,000,000 radio listeners 
that Al Jolson was far from through. 

The $5,000 weekly pay check tendered him by the 
oil sponsors was not the inducement. How could it be 
to a man worth 13.000,000? It was pride. He just 
couldn't throw up the sponge as long as he could bend 
that famous knee and spread that famous smile. He 
was coming back, but perhaps for the last time. 

Those were Al Jolson's thoughts as the graceful, 
mechanical bird speeded toward Newark airport that 
night. He wasn't worrying about any orchestra 
leader. Hadn't he sent Young an optimistic wire 
which read: WITH YOU ON THE SHOW MY 
WORRIES ARE OVER? 

But still the picture was not bright. Victor Young 
in need of an important job — he hadn't garnered a 
big-time network program in twelve months — couldn't 
let his personal feelings interfere with a job, any 
job. He had a wife to support. He gritted his teeth 
and clenched his fists. 

If only the close friends of both men had stopped 
their whispering campaigns for the moment, and 
studied the situation more intelligently, they would 
have discovered an ironic but obvious parallel be- 
tween the two artists. For on life's complicated pat- 
tern of sordid realism and burning ambition, the 
careers of Al Jolson and Victor Young were amaz- 
ingly similar! 

Al's life was no bed of roses. From rickety sea- 
shore beer gardens and shiny blue serge suits, he 
rose to fame and fortune. (Continued on page 78) 



Right, Al Jolson who preferred his bookie's sugges- 
tions on songs! On opposite page, Victor Young, 
one of the first men to say "No!" to Al. Below, was 
this picture made for publicity — or did they mean it? 





PENNINGTON 



For Connie 
Gates' pro- 
gram see page 
50 — 3 and 4 o'- 
clock columns; 
also page 51 
8 P.M. column. 



RADIO stars don't have to worry about their looks, 
They don't have to be beautiful!" 

Have you ever said this to yourself? Well, if 
you have, don't say it again. You're only kidding your- 
self. 

Beauty is just as essential to a radio performer as it is 
to a stage or a screen personality. And one of them, realiz- 
ing the importance of being "lovely to look at, delightful 
to know," has made herself over, transformed herself from 
a plain, mousey-looking,, shy little girl into a glamorous 
personality that any screen star would envy. 

That girl is Connie Gates, CBS star, whose new and 
different Moon Glow program has just made its appear- 
ance on the air. And what Connie Gates has done, you 
too can do. 

Six months ago Connie was the girl at the bottom. 
The other pictures are not of Barbara Stanwyck. They are 
Connie as she is today. And here's how she brought about 
this magical transformation. 

"It was really that picture that made me decide to un- 
dertake this remaking business," she explained to me. 
"As soon as I saw it I said to myself, 'Dear Lord, can this 
be I? Is that what Connie Gates looks like to the world?' 
I was hopelessly out of date. I couldn't believe the girl in 
that picture was a 1935 person. So, with everything else 
going stream-line these days, I determined to make myself 
over, stream-line both my appearance and my personality." 

Connie took stock of herself. She found a fundamentally 
attractive, middle-western girl, sweet and bashful, at times 
painfully shy. Her clothes were in good taste but far too 





V «* 



CONNIE GATES 



IF YOU THINK BEAUTY ISN'T ESSENTIAL TO RADIO STARS— THEN READ 
THIS UNUSUAL STORY OF HOW ONE GIRL MADE HERSELF OVER! 



old for her twenty-three years — "quite home cooky," to 
use her own words. Her walk was not particularly grace- 
ful, her diction lacked the interest and distinction she had 
noticed in other voices at the studio. Since she was in- 
clined to be self-effacing she used make-up sparingly, and 
it seemed to add none of the glamor promised by the 
cosmetic advertisements. 

With all these faults to overcome, Connie realized that 
she needed expert advice and she went after it. 

"Of course, the first and most vitally important step 
was the change of make-up," she said, "and I'm more en- 
thusiastic about that than about anything else. 1 didn't 
want to get a new face or to add a layer of so-called glamor, 
nor did I want to present an artificial, obviously made-up 
appearance. I did want to emphasize my best features, 
make myself as attractive, as possible, and still look 
natural." 

Since movie make-up artists, of all people in the world, 
are most frequently called upon to create a natural effect 
with an artificial medium, Connie consulted one. He 
studied her features and her coloring carefully while she 
explained just what she wanted in this matter of make-up, 
then they went to work. 

First, an arresting change was made by the rearrange- 
ment of her hair. She had parted it on the side and let it 
frame her face in straight lines. Now, by parting it in 
the middle and drawing it back smoothly from her face, 
she not only accentuates the beautiful modeling of her 
head but achieves sleekness-stream-lining. Lifting the hair 
up and away from the temples brings out the roundness of 



her face, while loose curls at the nape of the neck soften 
the severity of line. 

Disliking an ovqr made up appearance, Connie had 
always used a minimum of lipstick, keeping it well within 
the line of her lips, resulting in the thin-lipped appearance 
in the earlier photograph. Today, by using lipstick well 
out to the line of her lips, she has added alertness and vi- 
tality to her expression. Yet the lovely, natural line of 
her lips is unchanged, only accentuated. 

"Experimenting with cosmetics was fun," Connie said. 
"We tried shade after shade of powder, rouge and lipstick, 
in varying combinations, before we were satisfied." 

Since Connie is fair-skinned, with chestnut hair and 
brown eyes, a light ochre powder was chosen. A medium 
rouge and a somewhat brighter lipstick were found to blend 
most effectively with the powder and to bring out the 
clearness of her skin. 

Having determined the shades 
of cosmetics to use, Connie dis- 
covered that her evening make- 
up was not so satisfactory as 
that for daytime use. That ne- 
cessitated more experimenting, 
the creation of a second make- 
up for evening wear. It is some- 
what darker than the first, in- 
cluding a darker powder base, 
but it withstands the tricks 
played by artificial lighting. 
(Continued on page 73) 



On the opposite 
page, Connie as she 
is today, after shelve 
ing forever the home 
cooky girl you see 
at the bottom. Be- 
low, the new Connie, 
and as a one-year- 
old whose interests 
were horticultural 
rather than artistic! 




RADIO'S 



MIRACLE 



MAN 




Alex Fckula 



HE WORKS FOR NOTHING, USES HIS 
TIME ON THE AIR SOLELY FOR HIS 
AUDIENCE'S WELFARE— READ THE 
UNUSUAL INSPIRING STORY OF "D. B." 



B 



JOHN EDWARDS 



STARS of the microphone come in all sizes and shapes,' 
but you'll admit it's unusual to find one who is sixty- 
five years old and weighs over two hundred pounds. 
I'm talking of D. B. Gurney, of WNAX, South Dakota, who 
probably has more listeners per watt than any other man 
on the air, and more influence with his audience than 
Father Coughlin or Huey Long. 

If you live in the East or the Far West, you haven't 
heard him, but those who know their kilocycles have, and 
they call him radio's miracle man. Do you ask me why? 
Let me ask you: Is it usual for a man to build and own a 
radio station and then by sheer charm, good sense and 
personality become his own headliner, the idol of a million- 

32 



odd listeners? Is it commonplace for a radio star to 
work for nothing and then use his time on the air solely 
for the welfare of his audience? 

It's so unusual, people call it a miracle. This man 
Gurney, "D. B." as they call him, is the wonder of the 
big shot radio magnates. They travel all the way to 
Gurney "s home in Yankton, S. D., simply to watch him 
work, to find out how he does it. 

Every fall he stages a stunt which no star in radio 
has ever done. Not to any extent at any rate. He 
broadcasts on the air an invitation to all his friends 
and acquaintances to lunch with him at his home. 
Can you imagine Eddie Cantor or Jack Benny doing 
this? 

And they come. Last year, 119,000 came and each 
caller was served all the griddle cakes, sausages, muffins 
and coffee he could hold. Enough food- was consumed 
to bury Radio City. Men, women and children from 
at least five states were there. They were all over the 
place, but, principally, they clustered about "D. B.," 
shaking his hand, swapping stories, talking politics. 
He knew everybody and everybody knew him. And 
no one called him "Mister" Gurney. 

"D. B." is a different type of star, a more friendly 
star. Rudy Vallee has a larger audience but how many 
of his listeners does he know? How many, on meeting 
him, would feel at home, let alone open up by calling 
him Rudy? 

Every day at noon this robust, ruddy-cheeked old 
man climbs the stairs to the WNAX studio. To get 
there he has to pass through the fragrant rooms where 
the trees and plants and shrubs and seeds which he sells 
for a living are stored. Incidentally, he sells plenty of 
these things, this year no less than 10,000,000 trees. He 
pulls up a chair, draws the mike a little nearer and 
starts talking. 

Sometimes his speech is prepared in advance; more 
often, he just talks, a mellow old grandpa who has 
stayed young, a fighting old foxy grandpa who knows 
what it is all about and dares to speak his mind. 

When he got the radio bug late in 1925, about a year 

before the National Broadcasting Company came into 

existence, he discovered that a few hundred' miles north 

a young fellow had built a small transmitter. "D. B." 

bought the whole thing for $200 and began broadcasting. 

At first, it was just a toy and the studio was his own front 

parlor but soon it became serious. He built a studio and 

a tower, got a license for a 1,000-watt station from the 

Federal Radio Commission and began broadcasting in 

earnest. From the outset he made the radio work for the 

good of "his people." 

They tell some amazing stories about him. For example, 
there was the time the dairy farmers of his state were hard 
hit because the sales of oleomargarine was so large they 
were robbing them of a market. 

You don't hear of many such things in the big towns. 
People have no time to do good for their neighbors." "D. B." 
called his station staff together. Songs were written, dra- 
matic sketches prepared, speakers hired — and a great cam- 
paign was launched with the slogan, "Butter is Better." 
Within four months, "D. B." got what he was after. Laws 
were passed in five states which put the skids under the 
Oleo makers and made the world a better place for the 
folks who manufacture butter. 

Do you wonder that he is called the miracle man, that 
thousands drive for miles just to shake his hand? He's 
always doing things like that. 

When gasoline was selling for 
twenty-one cents a gallon in South 
Dakota, Gurney didn't like it. He 
requested the oil companies to cut 
their prices to seventeen cents which 
was enough (Continued on page 59) 



D. B. Gurney 
operates and 
stars on his own 
station WNAX, 
South Dakota. 



Welcome to this vivid personality of stage and _ 

you've heard on the Lux Theater and who is starring, beginning 

October I, in a series of unusual dramatic broadcasts over NBC. 



MC-M photo 







The Crosbys pose a deux but we'll bet Gory 
and the twins aren't far away. Bing is bade 
on the air as you read this, after some 
fishing in his home town, Spokane, Wash. 



Paramount photo 




i-rV 






» 



^rt 






^hx^ft^ 



FROM behind studio doors on New York's rialto of 
radio and night clubs are pouring in swelling volume 
the ecstatic, unrepressed notes of hot rhythm music, 
the music of a decade ago. 

Whether you like it or not, razzmatazz, as the trade calls 
much of it, is coming back. A couple of nights at your 
loudspeaker should convince you. There's Louis Prima and 
his Famous Door Five; Joe Venuti's orchestra; Louis Arm- 
strong and his new band; Fats Waller and his Darktown 
Meetin' Time ensemble; the bands of Eddie South and 
Wingy Manone. And the Mills Brothers are coming back 
on the air October fourth. 

* * # 

INMOST people thought hot tunes had been buried in the 
plot next to the squealing battery sets. Glen Gray 
seems to have been the one to give it the shot of adrenalin 
which has brought on this sudden reversion to scorch-song 
technique. As one radio executive expresses it, his or- 
chestra made it sufficiently respectable for sponsorship. 

Observe the returning popularity of Benny Goodman, 
of the warm, sinuous tunes of Ray Noble. Think back to 
the Vallee programs of two years ago. Now recall the most 
recent one to which you've listened. Why, that fellow's 
been sliding in hot tunes so deftly, so imperceptibly, that 
you've probably never noticed the change. Unless, perhaps, 
you were warned when he had Eddie South and Louis 
Prima as guest artists. 

* * * 

^^HEN 1 Louis Prima was brought to New York from 
New Orleans last year, his hot trumpet heralded the 
returning vogue. He is the most representative of the torrid 
music of ten years ago — with some new touches added. 
There are just five in the group. Besides himself, there are 
Pee Wcc Russell, clarinetist; Gary McAdams, guitarist; 
John Ryan, bass, and Frank Pinera, pianist. Just five. 
That's all, but they do the tricky music. 

* * * 

Wj'OR any of you who shed tears at the passing of hot 
* music, just look at the fairly old timers included in Joe 
Venuti's orchestra. Phil Napoleon, trumpet player, one of 
the founders of the Original Memphis Five; Miff Mole, 
who's melted many a trombone mouthpiece in his day; 
Mike Massielo, called one of radio's best trumpeters; Toots 
Mondella, former saxophonist of Benny Goodman's or- 

36 



chestra, and Paul Ricci, another saxophonist, who has 
played with Goodman, Arnold Johnson and Joe Haymes. 
And don't forget Ella Logan, the hotcha-scotcha girl. She 
really did come from Scotland. 

* * * 

WUST one more thing, then we'll cool off. Remember 
" when everyone said that the Mills Brothers were washed 
up in radio? They went to England and triumphed with 
two successful tours totaling five months, during which 
they played a command performance before King George 
and Queen Mary, and were at a party or so with the Prince 
of Wales and Prince George. The two princes are said to 
be quite daffy over hot music. So if it's good enough for 
them, we guess it's good enough for us. 

But certainly this returning vogue would have a very 
hard time unseating Guy Lombardo and Wayne King. They 
have too loyal a following. 

Furthermore, Jacques Fray asserts that with his new 
orchestra on NBC, he's attempting to achieve smooth, 
gentle charm, with arrangements designed to make his 
piano sing out rather than blast away by itself. 

* * * 
FROM DUALISTS TO DUELLISTS 

Too bad about Fray and Braggiotti's breakup. To most 
people, they'd seemed such gay friends. They first met 
several summers ago in a Paris music publishing house. 
There was a charming American girl there at the same 
time. Also George Gershwin. 

Gershwin urged them to play as a team, and after several 
engagements in Europe, they came to this country and the 
Columbia Broadcasting System. 

They were seen together in night clubs, always with at- 
tractive women. They seemed the best of comrades, both 
in work and in play. Yet now and again there were quar- 
rels. And they began to increase in number and feeling. 

The final dispute occurred not long ago. It is said to 
have taken place on Long Island, and concerned the same 
American girl they'd met when they first saw each other 
in Paris. This capped the climax. They split for good. 

* * * 

■ UST so that the Benny fans among you won't be too 
** startled when you hear his new fall program, you must 
learn that no longer will the comedian hurtle ribs back and 



WHAT'S GOING ON IN MUSIC- 



LAND AND INTIMATE GOSSIP 



ABOUT RADIO MUSIC MAKERS 







m 



* ^ 




WITH JOHN SKINNER 



forth with Frank Parker and Don Bestor. Re- 
placing them are Michael Bartlett, who sang 
the tenor lead with Grace Moore in "Love Me 
Forever," and Johnny Green and his orches- 
tra. 

It would seem that Parker and Bestor felt 
they deserved more money this year. The 
sponsor said, "Nay!" 

* * * 

SUMMERTIME, Carmen Lombardo as- 
•^ serts, is pretty full of romance all right, 
but not enough full to make his work very 
hard at composing love tunes. So in the dog 
day slump, he's prepared only four new songs. 
They'll be along soon. (Continued on page 60) 



There's no favoritism 
among the Lombardo s. 
They're from left to right, 
Carmen, Guy, Lebert and 
Victor. Above, Joe Venuti's 
hotcha-scotcha girl, Ella 
Logan, hails from Scotland. 

Lower left, Kea Rea, heard 
from the Hotel Morrison, 
Chicago. Below, Johnnie 
and The Foursome. Left 
to right, Ray Johnson, 
Johnnie, Dwight Snyder, Del 
Porter and Marshall Smith. 



WHAT THIS GRAND NEW 
DEPARTMENT GIVES YOU 

1. All the latest news and gossip 
about popular music and musicians. 

2. The exact size and personnel of 
famous jazz orchestras. 

3. Inside facts about signature songs 
and theme songs. 

4. Where your favorite radio orches- 
tras are playing each month. 

5. A chance to get your own ques- 
tions about popular songs and 
bands answered. 




u. 



^ 






Here are Fred Waring's group of entertain- 
ers. Above, left to right, the twin saxophone 
players, Arthur and George McFarland, the 
Lane Sisters, Rosemary and Priscilla (right), 
Stella and her fellahs, Roy Ringwald at the 
piano with Paul Gibbons on his right and 
Craig Leitch on his left. Gene Conklin, left, 
is tenor, saxophone footer and whistler. Right, 
Tom Waring, Fred's brother, is star soloist. 
Below, frog-voiced "Poley" McClintock and 
Johnnie Davis (with horn), scat singer and hot 
trumpeter. Bottom, the Pennsylvanians en 
masse and opposite page, Fred himself. 












m 






m 



3H. 




m 



.■K 



W 



m 



m 




m 



'i&8 



mt 






*i\ 






WORDS AND MUSIC O 



F THIS SLOW DREAMY 



SLEEP 



WALTZ - FRED WARN 



JG'S THEME SONG 



Trmpo di Valse| 



ARE PRINTED HERE 



AT YOUR REQUEST 



Sleep, Sleep, 

Tempo di Valse 



Sleep. 



For the Fred Waring Hour, 
sponsored by Ford, turn to 
page 51 — 9 o'clock column. 



r-fT 



V 



m 



» 



^TT 




jnu 



jp J u 



How we love 



to 



sleep . 



At the close 



i§*f 



k > i i i 



«TT 



«TT 



rrr 



mm 



l= i = j * £ 



"/. 



r 



* 



F » 



wt 



of 



day. 



When the joys . 



of the day fade a 



§ ka.i 



s 






¥ 



^^i 



p 



^^ 




Copyright by 
Sherman Clay & 
Co., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 



BEAUTY IS IN 





The Shell Chateau was her 
first big break, and now 
Niela Goodelle has her own 
program of song and piano 
melodies in which she plays 
her own accompaniment, 
sponsored by Cutex, over a 
WJZ-NBC network. See 
page 54 — 9 o'clock column. 



Every month Joyce Anderson 
brings you the beauty se- 
crets of radio's most glamor- 
ous stars. This month she 
tells you how to have beauti- 
ful, well-groomed hands, like 
Niela Goodelle's. Write Miss 
Anderson for advice on all 
your beauty troubles, whether 
they have to do with mani- 
cures, cosmetics, reducing or 
skin care. Just send a 
stamped, self-addressed en- 
velope with your query to 
Joyce Anderson, RADIO 
MIRROR, 1926 Broadway, 
New York .City, New York. 
40 



By JOYCE ANDERSON 

VACATIONS are past, the last days of 
brilliant sunshine are over — and how 
are your hands? That's not as illogical 
as it may appear at first sight. Brittle, broken 
nails and roughened hands are the price we pay 
for outdoor sports and playtime neglect. Yet 
beautiful, graceful hands are so important for 
the coming social season, when hands, faces 
and hair are highlighted against the darker 
and heavier clothes we wear in fall and winter. 
Pianists are exceptionally particular 
about their hands, so I went to Niela 
Goodelle to get her advice about mani- 
cures for you. 

"In spite of the fact that I have only 
played my own accompaniments in my 
public appearances up to date, Mother 
and I had planned at one time that I 
should be a concert pianist," said Niela, 
looking very lovely and girlish in a beau- 
tiful two-piece suit which she had knitted 
for herself. "Naturally, I learned to take 
good care of my hands. Piano playing 
makes your fingers flexible, gives you 
greater manual dexterity, but it does take 
its toll in shapeliness and good grooming. 
The stretching exercises enlarge the mus- 
cles and are apt to pull the fingers out of 
their natural proportions. 

"To combat this as much as possible, I 
massage my hands a great deal. This 
massage is very simple, not much differ- 
ent from the simple motions we go 
through when we wash our hands; it's 
just more vigorous and sustained. For or- 
dinary purposes, the only things you 
want to concentrate on are stimulating 
the circulation (which is always good for 
the skin) and keeping the knuckles 
smooth; a good hand cream helps in the 
massage. The more you exercise your 
fingers, too, the more graceful and ex- 
pressive they become. 

"I have to keep my fingernails much 
shorter than I would like, in order to 
strike the keys properly, but that little 
disappointment doesn't keep me from 
paying just as much attention to my mani- 
cures as possible. Would you like to know 
the routine I follow?" 

I certainly would — and I thought you 
would, too. So here it is: the scientific 
practical manicure which Niela Goodelle 
gives herself two or three times each 
week, and which you can give yourself in 
your own home. (Continued on page 84) 



THE GREAT RADIO 

MURDER MYSTERY 





FLASH HANLON REVEALS 

THE REAL MURDERER OF GAIL 

RICHARD AND THE PROFESSOR! 



THOMAS leaped from the couch and ran to the loud- 
speaker at the end of the lounge, straining forward 
to catch every word, like an angry bulldog at the 
end of a short leash. In this dramatic moment Lee and 
Sidney sat perfectly still, spellbound by the electric magic 
Flash was weaving. 

"But first," Flash went on, his voice edged with suspense, 
"let me tell you how the murder was committed. You re- 
member that it was the opening night of the new radio 
program, Night Club Revue. That program was to be 
broadcast from the old Beckwith Theater. The murderer's 
plans took note of the fact that backstage at the Beckwith 
might be a perfect spot for crime. Late on the afternoon of 
the final rehearsal, knowing that for years Gail had always 
kept a revolver in her dressing room, the murderer stole 
upstairs, took the gun, and left the theater. 

"A moment before the broadcast was to begin, the mur- 
derer stood in the narrow hallway backstage. Until then, 
the time of the murder had not been decided upon. But 
as the murderer stood there, Gail came down the stairs. 
No one else was in sight. On sudden impulse, the mur- 
derer shot. You remember the Professor, Gail's first hus- 
band? Unknown to the murderer, he was standing in the 
alley that night, waiting for a chance to talk again to Gail. 
As the Professor came through the stage door into the 
theater he saw the murderer, whom he instantly recognized. 
Then the Professor ran away, planning on blackmail. He 



FREDERICK RUTLEDGE 



waited a few days, hiding from the police, then 
called the murderer on the telephone. He told 
the murderer what he had seen and promised to 
hold his silence for a price. Trapped, the mur- 
derer made a date "for the payment of the money. 
"They met in the Professor's hotel room in a 
shabby district near the Brooklyn Bridge. They 
were alone in the building. The murderer had 
made his plans carefully. After killing the Pro- 
fessor, the murderer would put the gun — the gun 
which he had stolen from Gail's dressing room 
and which had killed Gail — into the dead man's 
hands. It would be apparent suicide. The Pro- 
fessor would be blamed for Gail's death. The 
case would be closed. The mur- 
derer had allowed for everything 
but an angry impulse. As they 
argued, the murderer in a sudden 
blaze of fury shot from too far 
away. It would be obvious to the 
police that the Professor could not 
have killed himself. So the mur- 
derer ran away, hiding the gun, 
since it now had no further value. 
"While the reasons for shooting 
the Professor are plain, you must 
know more of the past to understand why Gail was killed. 
"The murderer and Gail Richard were old friends some 
years ago when a feud, a spiteful quarrel, began between 
them. It lasted several months. Then, one day, Gail 
called. She wanted to call the fight off, to bury the hatchet, 
she said. The murderer was willing. They met at a restau- 
rant one noon and as a peace offering Gail told a fantastic 
story which she knew would be of value since at that time 
she was already a famous vaudeville star. The murderer 
believed her story. Later it proved to be false and the 
murderer, as a result, became the laughing stock of the 
town. Gail's spiteful revenge was never forgotten — nor 
forgiven. 

"After the Professor's death, this murderer might have 
made one of the other suspects seem guilty in the eyes of 
the law. But there are strange quirks hidden in all of us. 
In the murderer was a strange mixture of sentiment and 
ego, and when an opportunity arose to place strong sus- 
picion on another, he would not use it. 

"He even feared that the case might die down, that the 
spotlight which until now had remained upon it might be 
turned in another direction. With fresh clues, he goaded 
the police into frantic action, but inevitably this drew the 
net tighter about him. 

"Why did he use every means in his power to keep the 
case alive and in the public eye? 

"The answer to that question, ladies and gentlemen, re- 
veals to us still another motive for the murder of Gail 
Richard, stronger even than the murderer's hatred for her. 
"Here was no ordinary criminal, lusting solely for re- 
venge, but a product of our modern age — one who for years 
had lived on the crimes and misfortunes of others — a news- 
paper man! A reporter who was always first to tell you of 
every new sensational event — {Continued on page 80) 

41 



SECRETS 



OF A 




MJDITOR'S MOTE: Mrs. Wright gives us this month de- 
^^ scriptions of more of the delightful parties at which 
she has entertained friends famous in the financial, social, 
stage and radio worlds. Whether or not you read her fas- 
cinating reminiscences last month, don't fail to follow them 
here. 

LAST month I started to tell you of a dinner party I 
t gave at which the guests arrived to find no dinner 
preparations under way and — no hostess. I had been 
delayed in reaching home because of a blowout and arrived 
to find my half starved guests wandering about the apart- 
ment, wondering just when they were going to eat. I an- 
nounced that everyone must do something to help. 

The spaghetti had to cook just exactly twenty minutes 
— i no more, no less — ai denti, as the Italians say which liter- 
ally translated means "just to the teeth." And while this 
was going on I put the guests to grating the Parmesan 
cheese, setting the table, washing the salad ingredients, 
squeezing lemons, etc. 

Fannie Brice was no help. She is always hungry and 
she kept wandering around tasting the sauce, eating the tid- 
bits being prepared for the cocktails and screaming, "Hurry 
up with that spaghetti; I'm starved." I was amazed to see 
how efficient Beatrice Lillie was and if it weren't for that 
attractive Margaret Livingston I'd be tempted to try to 
lure Paul Whiteman. He knows how to set a table better 
than a domestic science teacher. 

What fun we had! I believe that nothing could have set 
the new guests more at their ease than grating cheese with 
George Metaxa. 

Things got done with surprising speed, in spite of Fannie 
Brice. We sat down at the table before half past eight. 
Everyone enjoyed the food twice as much because they 
were so hungry. We had red wine and Chianti and it was 
all grand. 

Incidentally, I approve of wine with a dinner because it 
makes everyone friendly and at ease. Drunkenness? Of 
that I do not approve, nor will I tolerate it in my home. 
The joy of a party is spoiled, the intimacy of a group 
of friendly people laughing and talking is gone when one 
member has had too much to drink. I never serve too much 
liquor and, by circulating the word around, I make it very 
clear that I won't have drunken scenes. But friendly wine — 
ah, that's different. 

Well, after this quite mad dinner, people I hadn't seen 




for months began to arrive. It was like old times. Charlie 
McArthur, Helen Hayes' husband, breezed in saying, "Bill 
Paley told me you were having a party. I felt like com- 
ing. Here I am." Young society debutantes dropped in. 
George Metaxa sang. Everyone began doing stunts and 
we were right in the swing of a grand party. 

You see? This one had cost almost nothing. It had been 
done without help, except from my guests (my man Friday 
arrived in time to wash the dishes) and yet it had been a 
great success, something to remember for a long, long time. 

Good hostessing consists so often of creating a back- 
ground for oneself. Here I am now living in a compara- 
tively small apartment when once I had enormous palatial 
city apartments, houses at Palm Beach and Newport. 
Luckily, from the crash I was able to save some of my 
lovely old things — rare pieces of furniture, delightful ob- 
jets d'art — but if I did not have these things I would create 
my surroundings. I would get simple pieces in a good de- 
sign, unpainted if necessary, and paint them myself. I'd 
make my friends help me paint, and they would sit up and 
take notice. I'd force them to have a good time in my 
home even if I were living in a hovel by the railroad tracks. 
Just by using a little energy and will power and daring to 
be different from her friends any woman can be a good 
hostess. 

Speaking of living in a hovel by the railroad tracks, there 
was a time when I thought this might be necessary and it 
happened at a party. I must tell you about it to show you 
that to a hostess no situation is too difficult to surmount. 

I knew that tremendous things were happening in Wall 
Street — that for days and nights men with red-rimmed eyes 
had not slept, that frantic people were trying to save the 
financial business from complete wreckage. I knew because 
I had spent one whole night in my husband's down-town 
office. I had seen those desperate, wild eyes. I had felt that 
brittle, emotional atmosphere. It was as dramatic and ex- 
citing as my two years at the Front. 

Three weeks before I had planned a large party and my 
stubbornness kept me from calling it off. It was not a 
dinner party but a musicale and several hundred guests 
were there — financiers, ambassadors, foreign ministers, mu- 



DO YOU KNOW THE SECRETS OF SUCCESSFUL ENTERTAINING? 



y 



rx 



* EZJ* 



^ 



Mrs. Wright has long been famous as one of New York's 
leading hostesses. Her parties have ranged from the elab- 
orate circus balls, described in this article, to small in- 
formal luncheons in her own home, such as the one above. 



sicians (amongst them Walter Damrosch), Henri Bernstein, 
the French writer, and his wife. 

The New York String Quartette was to play, with Henry 
Hadley playing with them and conducting his own compo- 
sitions. 

1 kept expecting my husband but he did not arrive. I 
had no idea how truly dreadful the situation down-town 
was. At ten o'clock I was called to the telephone. It was 
my husband. 

He said, "We've lost everything we have. Everything is 
gone. This is the end." 

Those words are forever burned into my memory. 

1 thought I should faint at the telephone, but instead I 
said, "We'll make out somehow. Come home now and dress 
in your own room and please come to the guests as if 
nothing had happened." 

But with this weight upon my heart I had to return to 
the musicale and sing some songs of Chanson and Debussey 
with the New York String Quartette, especially arranged 
for me, that were on the program. They were tremen- 
dously difficult numbers and that was good for 'me for in 
thinking of their intricacy I forgot my own troubles for a 
moment. 

When I had finished, Damrosch told me he had never 
heard me sing better. "You sang with real heart-break in 
your music!" Ah, if he had only known. 

But there were only two men at the reception who knew 
what had happened. They were the bankers, Jules Bache 
and Willis Booth, and when I had finished singing they 
looked at each other and said, in my hearing, "Well, we 
know a good sport when we see one." 

And then Bache turned to me and said, "If there is any- 
thing I can do, let me know." What a good friend he was 
to offer to help! 

When my husband arrived I knew what he had. been 
through by the stricken look upon his face and, for once, 
it seemed as if the guests would never leave. Usually, I'm 
having such a good time at my own parties that I hate to 
see them break up. but on this dreadful night I thought I 
should go mad. 

Every woman who has (Continued on page 82) 



HERE'S YOUR CHANCE TO LEARN THEM! 




At such large par- 
ties the guests are 
not always known 
to each other, so 
Mrs. Wright points 
some of them out 
to George Gersh- 
win, above. Left, 
Walter Damrosch, 
dean of American 
conductors and a 
frequent guest at 
Cobina's home, in 
the costume he wore 
at one of her balls. 

43 



WHAT DO YOU WANT TO 




KNOW? 



IT has just occurred to us that if we had Aladdin's lamp, 
we might be able to rub it and find the answers to all 
your questions. The real rub is, however, that some 
of you can ask for more knowledge than one poor har- 
rassed Oracle can. sometimes supply. But with a firm grip 
on the situation and with chin held high, we're still fight- 
ing to catch up with your letters. If your letter is still 
going begging, watch next month. 

F. J. C, Springfield, 111. — You're sure getting an an- 
swer, but your order was too tremendous for me to fill. 
Some of the stars you mentioned were listed in the Radio 
Mirror Directory published in the October issue. This 
month you'll find still more in Part 2 of the Directory. 

Helen W., Lincoln Place, Pa. — The May Radio Mirror 
ran a complete and detailed article on the radio stars' 
salaries. It was entitled "How Much Money Can You Make 
in Radio?" Didn't you see it? 

Virginia Ann L., Akron, Ohio — If you purchased your 
copy of Radio Mirror for October, I'm sure you found the 
address of Glen Gray and "Pee Wee" Hunt in the Direc- 
tory. Write and ask them for photos. I don't think they'll 
charge you for them. 

Charlotte K., N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. — We do not sup- 
ply cuts of pictures published in Radio Mirror. Sorry, but 
you can write Ethel Shutta in care of the National Broad- 
casting Company, Merchandise Mart, Chicago, 111., and 
ask her for one of her photos. 

Alma S., Jacksonville, Fla. — Radio City includes sev- 
eral famous buildings, the largest of which is the R. C. A. 

44 



Write to the Oracle, RADIO MIRROR, 1926 Broad- 
way, New York City, and have your questions 
about personalities and radio programs answered 



Bess Johnson, whom you know as Frances Moran of To- 
day's Children, the modern, sophisticated bachelor girl, 
is a devoted wife and mother. She's Mrs. Paul Perry, and 
little Jane Orr, shown with her here, is six years old. 

Building. It is in New York City and houses only the 
National Broadcasting Company. Yes, mail addressed to 
the NBC stars will be forwarded from there. The Fred 
Waring program is broadcast from one of New York's 
Broadway theaters. A letter addressed to him in care of 
the Columbia Broadcasting System, 485 Madison Avenue, 
New York City, will reach him. I don't blame you for 
being confused, Alma, and I certainly don't think you're 
what you said you are. 

Florence V., Lake Tahoe, Calif. — Eddie Duchin has 
remained on the air all this summer while Ed Wynn was 
vacationing. Haven't you been hearing his music on Tues- 
day nights over the NBC network? 

Anthony De Lesa, Bangor, Pa. — I'm sorry, Anthony, 
we do not sell pictures of famous radio bands. If you have 
been reading Radio Mirror each month, you will have 
noticed our articles "Facing the Music" which give plenty 
of information about the bands and their personnel. 

Miss Lois K., Sparkill, N. Y. — Johnny Hauser was born 
in New York City in 1910 . . . won an amateur contest at 
the age of thirteen. Paul Whiteman signed him after his 
first audition in March, 1933. He's now featured soloist 
on the Lucky Strike "Hit Parade." Before that, he had the 
usual tough time. Got a job singing with a band at a sum- 
mer resort until he was finally heard by a radio talent scout. 

Mary K. B., Baltimore, Md. — Address your letter to 
Kerry Donovan in care of the Columbia Broadcasting Sys- 
tem, 485 Madison Ave., New York City. 

Miss J. L., Riverside, N. J. — Phil Regan seems to be 
doing so well out Hollywood way that he has forsaken 
radio. But one can never tell. Address him in care of 
Warner Brothers, Burbank, Calif. 

Mrs. B., Lakehurst, N. J. — Gail and Dan of "Danger- 
ous Paradise" are not married to each other in real life, 
though each is married. 

Jerome C. M., Kulpmont, Pa. — Seek, Jerry, and ye 
shall find Helen Jepson's address in Radio Mirror's Direc- 
tory on page 6. 



WHAT DO YOU WANT TO 




Rudolph H. Hoffmann 



WE'D like to see you deny the fact that somewhere 
tucked away in the back of yoirr mind or burn- 
ing on the tip of your tongue is a worthwhile opin- 
ion on the radio fare your loudspeaker is bringing you thi> 
fall. And you've got to admit that such opinions written 
on paper are fun and worth money. So sit down now, get 
it off your chest, and gallop with it to the nearest letter 
box. We'll be waiting to hear what you have to say. The 
prizes are $20.00 for the best letter, $10.00 for the second 
best and $1.00 each for the next five. Address your letter 
to the Editor, Radio Mirror, 1926 Broadway, New York 
City, and mail it by October 22. 
This month's prize winning letters ; 

$20.00 PRIZE 

During the past two or three weeks it has been almost 
impossible for me to sit down and tune in my favorite pro- 
gram without first consulting the newspaper, magazines or 
some other radio timetable. This is caused by the many 
changes which are taking place during this season. By the 
time I have located the program I want, it is half over. 
The old saying is that a half loaf is better than none, but 
if I can't hear the complete program I would rather not 
hear any of it. I believe that the sponsor would reap more 
benefit by staying with a certain hour than by switching 
around here and there where we listeners have so much 
trouble in finding them. Even Amos 'n' Andy are moving 
to new stations. Wouldn't that burn you up? 

Chas. Dooley, 
Zanesville, Ohio. 

$10.00 PRIZE 

I particularly dislike announcements over the radio 
which are made by women, simply because of their artificial 
and affected voicey Almost all men announcers have voices 



SAY? 



This is your page, readers! Here's a chance to get 
your opinions in print! Write your letter today, 
have your say, and maybe you'll win the big prize! 



This year Sigmund Romberg, famous musician and com- 
poser, is joined on the Swift Studio Party by the well-known 
musical critic, commentator and composer, Deems Taylor. 
You'll find this program entertaining and — yes, informal! 



which might conceivably be their own, but almost every 
woman finds it necessary to adopt the broad A, and a 
stilted, affected way of talking, under the impression, ap- 
parently, that this is cultivated speech. 

I notice this tendency particularly on the various cos- 
metic programs, perhaps, because this is more or less ex- 
clusively a woman's field. At any rate, I believe a natural, 
unaffected voice would have far greater appeal, and would 
certainly sound more sincere and convincing. The reac- 
tion most radio listeners get to an affected voice is a dis- 
tinctly unfavorable one, and this unfavorable reaction 
includes the product as well as the speaker. 

Dorothy S. Davidson, 
Rochester, New York. 

$1.00 PRIZE 

Tell me, what can one do about the talkative neighbor 
who is never interested in any programs same those on 
the small local stations, but is always popping in when 
you are listening to something of vital interest on your 
own set? One ear catches the barrage of endless chatter 
while the other makes a futile attempt to catch the precious 
words which, you realize with a sinking heart, will not be 
repeated. 

For three weeks I have waited and listened for a certain 
announcement and now all 1 have garnered above the din 
of meaningless jabber is, "We are indebted to so-and-so 
for all this, information about the gang; and that, dial 
spinners, answers the questions you've been waiting so long 
to hear." , 

Yours for silence, 

Mrs. H. M. Mireau, 
Long Beach, Calif. 

$1.00 PRIZE 

Being a regular listener of all the children's programs 
around supper time, such as Jack Armstrong, Dick Tracy 
and Bobby Benson, I notice that all of the main characters 
or "heroes" in the plays are boys and men, and I have 
been thinking, "Why not have a children's program with 
a girl as the main character?" Of course, I am sure all the 
girls enjoy the programs with boys and men as the main 
characters, but we want to think that we are important 
enough to have one of us take a (Continued on page 86) 

45 



&Jtf' 



m^& 






I 



■caej** 5 



R 



,OBERT L. RIPLEY has found his trail's 
end. He traveled 450,000 miles — the distance 
to the moon and back — to get there, and 
spent twenty years in search of it. And, believe it 
or not, all the time it was just a stone's throw from 
New York City! 

The end of the trail — a trail that has led an eager, 
adventurous young man through one hundred and 
sixty-seven countries of the world in search of the 
incredible — lies on an island in the Long Island 
Sound near Mamaroneck, New York. It is called 
"Isla Sonada," Isle of Dreams, and it. is the only 
real home Ripley has ever had. 

Back to Isla Sonada, he will come after his new 
adventures in the far corners of the earth. The little 
island will be his headquarters this winter between 
broadcasts at the National Broadcasting Company 
studios, where he will be featured on the Bakers' 
broadcast with Harriet Hilliard and Ozzie Nelson. 
He is so happy and pleased with it that nothing short 
of a man with three heads could lure him away 
from his new-found home, although he says that 
there are many strange things left for him to dis- 
cover which some day he must investigate. 

You wouldn't think that there could be anything 
startling left to -see, if you could take a peek at 
Ripley's Blue Room. On his thirty-three acre estate 
there is a beautiful, rambling house of .twenty-two 
rooms. One room you could never forget. That is 
the Blue Room, which he is turning into a museum 
of the amazing objects that he has acquired during 
the years since 1918 when he turned in his first "Believe It 
or Not" cartoon on the old New York Globe. It's worth a 
fabulous fortune, but the collection has brought Ripley 
vast returns on his expenditure. During the Chicago World's 
Fair, it was on display to the public in an "Odditorium," 
which proved to be one of the Fair's most successful money- 
makers. 

Now that he has found a permanent home for his treas- 
ures, let's let Mr. Believe- 1 t-Or-Not himself show us through 
his Blue Room. 

He comes bounding down the stairs to meet us from the 
third floor wing where he and a staff of more than a dozen 
people work on his cartoons. He's a pleasant and youthful- 

46 



Photos taken exclusively for Radio Mirror by Wide World 



RIPLEY'S 
HOUSE OF 



I b: 



EVERETTA LOVE 



looking man, with a rather shy grin. We like him instantly. 
He believes in being comfortable while he works. He is 
clad in maroon silk pajamas and dressing-gown, and wears 
the most amazing white sandals. We stare at them, in 
fascination. They have "stubbers" on them, to protect his 
toes. They are the sandals, he tells us, which the Italian 
soldiers wear during their marches in the desert. They are 
perfect, because they are made so that the sand will run 
right out of them. 

"Rip" leads us through a charming music room, which 
has wide windows overlooking the sound, and throws open 
a door. We step in, and utter a loud shriek. It is the 
famous Blue Room. In a corner, facing us, is the horrible, 






I 



motionless figure of a man. A light plays on him, delineat- 
ing all of his sinister features. 

"Don't be alarmed," Ripley smiles. "That's Hananuma 
Masakichi, but he isn't alive." 

Masakichi, it seems, was a well-known Japanese artist. 
He was dying of tuberculosis, and he wished to leave a 
monument to his skill. So, for years, he labored on this 
life-like wooden figure of himself. It is five feet tall. The 
veins, ribs and muscles stand out, in the exact manner in 
which they did on Masakichi in real life. The hair, eye- 
brows and eyelashes are his own. He pulled them from him- 
self and grooved them into the figure. He put his own finger- 
nails and toe-nails on the figure. When he had finished it, 
it was one of the startling oddities of the world. A collec- 
tor brought the figure from Japan to San Francisco in 1921. 
Ripley heard of it and spared no expense to get it. Now, 
it is the prize object of his museum. 

We turn from it, with a shudder, and look at a more 
pleasant corner of the room. Here is a complete opium 
layout which he brought from the island of Macao, off the 
coast of China. Macao is the headquarters for pirates, and 
the most wicked opium and gambling district of the Orient. 
Ripley went there, while he was in China, and, one evening, 
visited an opium den with a friend. They found themselves 



in a large, circular room, built on several levels, enclosed 
by balconies. The balconies were filled with smokers. On 
the first floor, the popular gambling game of fantan was be- 
ing conducted. The smokers from the tiers above would 
lower their money in baskets and take part in the game. 
Ripley and his friend decided to try fantan. 

"We lowered our money," he laughs, "but we never got 
any back. It is the American game of 'put and take,' 
with all 'put' and no 'take.' " 

The Chinese took Ripley for more than the game, how- 
ever, because, before he left the place, he had negotiated 
for the elaborate opium lay-out which we now see in his 
museum. 

In a glass case, we observe, with a sort of fascinated hor- 
ror, several specimens of the famous shrunken human heads 
from the Jivaro region of Peru. Ripley selects one of the 
"beauties" and holds it up for our inspection. 

"Feel the hair," he says. "It is still growing." 

We look at him skeptically, but feel that it's rather 
futile to question anything "Believe-It-or-Not" says. He 
can always produce facts and figures. 

"This head was once of normal size and riding around on 
the shoulders of a Jivaro warrior in the Peruvian tropical 
forests," he tells us. "Now, it (Continued on page 88) 



For the Bakers 
Broadcast with 
Robert L. Ripley, 
see page 54 — 7 
o'clock column. 



COME AND VISIT 



BOB'S FIRST REAL 



HOME, WHERE HE 



COLLECTS THOSE 



STARTLING BELIEVE 



IT OR NODDITIES 




Doesn't he look real (above)? 
It's the weird statue of Ma- 
sakichi, which is described in 
the story. Upper right, look 
closely and you'll find the 
treasure-hunter examining one 
of the shrunken heads from 
Jivaro. Extreme right, the 
gong that rings for ten minutes 
when struck; and right, Rip 
lights his cigarette from the 
candle that burns at both ends. 




COOKING A LA 




By MRS. MARGARET SIMPSON 



WHETHER good cooks are born or made has 
never been decided satisfactorily, but one thing 
is certain — you can't keep a born cook out of 
the kitchen no matter how busy a professional or social 
life she may lead. 

Take Madame Sylvia, for instance. Her word on diet is 
law to the leading lights of the radio and screen worlds and 
what with advising her large clientele, preparing magazine 
material and filling radio engagements she is a very busy 
person indeed — just the kind of person you would expect 
would go in for hotel dining or the services of a cook. But 
she does neither. 

"Here we are in this apartment," she told me. "It is too 
small for such a large family," (the family consists of 
Madame Sylvia, her husband, Eddie Leiter, the actor, and 
two large, handsome tawny cats) "and too close to the 
ground, but it was the only one in the building that had a 
kitchen, and a kitchen I must have. No matter how late I 
get home, or how tired I may be, 1 would rather cook 
dinner at home than go to a restaurant. 

"Cooking experiments are such fun, too," she went on. 
"Some of our favorite dishes are ones 1 have invented on 
the spur of the moment. Here's one that my husband 
always chooses when I ask what he wants for dinner, and 
I made it up one night when 1 was having guests for dinner 
and hadn't the ingredients on hand to prepare Vienna 
schnitzel. It's quick and easy, and one of the best dishes I 
know to give to unexpected guests." 

Veal a la Madame Sylvia 

In a generously buttered casserole, over a low flame, brown 
potatoes which have been shaped into small round balls 
with a vegetable scoop, shaking the casserole frequently so 
that the potatoes will not burn. Cut three thin slices of 
Canadian bacon fine and add, with a finely minced clove 
of garlic, to the potatoes, with pepper and salt to taste 
(better go easy on the salt, because the Canadian bacon 
is salty). While the potatoes and bacon are browning, 
cut veal steak into one-inch squares. Brown the veal in the 

48 



casserole with the potatoes and bacon and continue cook- 
ing, shaking frequently to prevent burning, until veal and 
potatoes are nearly done. Add a cupful of pickled beets, 
cut into cubes somewhat smaller than the veal cubes. When 
veal and potatoes are done and the beets heated through, 
add half a pint of sour cream. No flour or other thickening 
is necessary, since the sour cream makes a sauce of the right 
consistency. 

"We serve this dish with fresh asparagus or some other 
fresh vegetable, or with a green salad, and a simple dessert 
such as fruit cup or currants in gelatine," Madame Sylvia 
said, "usually the latter — it's our favorite dessert and one 
we have two or three times a week during the winter." 

Currants in Gelatine 

Place three cups of washed, stemmed currents and half a 
pound of sugar in a sauce pan with just enough water to 
prevent burning. Simmer until the fruit starts to jell, 
skimming repeatedly until clear. The consistency is then 
about half way between currant jelly and canned currants, 
although the fruit itself remains whole. ("Of course," 
Madame Sylvia explained, "I prepare the currants in the 
summer, and seal them in jelly glasses for use during the 
winter.") Now empty a small envelope of gelatine into a 
little cold water and let stand for half an hour. Add three- 
fourths of a cup of hot water and when the gelatine is 
thoroughly dissolved stir in three cups of the prepared cur- 
rants, or three jeily glasses full, then place in refrigerator 
until the mixture sets. Serve with top milk for family 
dinners, but if you wish to transform this dessert into an 
elaborate party dish here's Madame Sylvia's variation: 
Brown salted almonds until they are crisp, chop fine and 
sprinkle on top of the gelatine, and serve with whipped 
cream instead of milk. 

Instead of currants, Madame Sylvia sometimes uses for 
this dessert gooseberries cooked with rum, according to an 
original recipe of her own. If you would like this unusual 
recipe I shall be glad lo send it to you. 

Another dessert popular with Madame Sylvia is this 
mixture of fruit in rum which she prepares during the 
summer when berries are in season. Cover the bottom of a 
stone jar with a layer of fruit, and cover with sugar — the 
proportions are a pound of fruit to a pound of sugar — then 
moisten the sugar with rum. Use as many layers of any 
one fruit as you wish, of course. Cover the jar and set 
away in the cellar or other cool place until the next berries 
are in season, and repeat the process. At the end of the 
summer, when the jar is filled, it can be put back into the 
cellar and the fruit used as desired. The fruit combina- 
tion that Madame Sylvia prefers {Continued on page 81) 



Madame Sylvia, whom you will be hearing again this fall on 
an NBC network, is too busy preparing her favorite vege- 
tables to smile at the camera. If you would like other recipes 
of Madame Sylvia's, mentioned in this article, just send a 
stamped, self-addressed envelop to Mrs. Margaret Simpson, 
1926 Broadway, New York, stating which ones you want. 
Also Mrs. Simpson will be glad to obtain for you your favorite 
stars' favorite recipes. All you have to do is just write her. 



RADIO MIRROR 



be heard twice a week thereafter, Thurs- 
days at the same time being the second 
night. Annette Hanshaw won't be sing- 
ing the blues because she and Walter 
never could understand each other. A 
girl named Deane Janis is replacing her 
on the half hour. Ted Musing, though, 
Glen Gray's band, and Louis "McGilli- 
cuddy" Sorin will be around. 

Just to mix this up and put you read- 
ers on your mettle, let's skip to the new 
programs that will grace your loudspeaker 
practically any time after the minute you 
finish reading about them. 

It would be foolish to name what 
sounds to us like the best bet of all the 
programs that are coming up. But from 
where we stand, just about the best 
sounding is Helen Hayes' weekly half 
hour. She's been signed for at least thir- 
teen weeks and she's to star in a con- 
tinued dramatic serial which will run over 
NBC. Edith Meiser, who became famous 
by writing the favorite Sherlock Holmes 
scripts, will author for Helen. 

Another very bright light will be cast 
by the show that starts soon on Friday 
nights over NBC's red network starring 
the Mills Brothers. After sporting about 
England all summer, they're back in Chi- 
cago now, rehearsing with Charles Pre- 
vin's orchestra. They'll have a sport an- 
nouncer, too. who will rattle off football 
predictions and scores. The time is 10:30 
(E.S.T.). 

IN place of the aforementioned Joe 
Penner, who was for sale by NBC with- 
out takers when we went to press, Be- 
lieve-lt-Or-Not Bob Ripley will hold 
sway. In addition to his stories of oddi- 
ties there'll be music and songs by Ozzie 
Nelson, his boys, and Harriet Hilliard. 
That's Sundays at 7:30, same time, same 
network. 

Then on Mondays, there's the Kolynos 
show, which is a revamped Hammerstein's 
Music Hall of the Air, which you may 
have heard last spring over CBS. An- 
other new one, two nights later, is the 
Log Cabin, which last year starred Lanny 
Ross, but which this year features two 
other artists. Conrad Thibault and Phil 
Cook. September 25th is the starting 
date, at 10:00. 

We also understand, on advice of a 
reliable press agent, that a combination 
musical and speech making show is in the 
offing, network not yet chosen. It will 
have the Howard Barlow orchestra and 
guest speakers. 

Not a new star but with a new sponsor 
is Kate Smith, who, starting October 
second, will sing Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 
and Thursdays, over CBS, her alma mater 
network. The Great Atlantic and Pacific 
stores pay her salary checks. 

Life Savers, deciding to sell its products 
to the "upper classes," has turned to radio 
for help. In what they describe as a 
"swank" atmosphere fa night club, we 
guess) such artists as Phil Duey, the Men 
About Town and Jane Williams are per- 
forming over NBC every Thursday at 
8:00. Jane, it will be remembered,' was 
the winner a year ago of a nation-wide 
contest to find a star for Hollvwood 
Hotel. 

You champions of the so-called finer, 
or highbrow, popular music will soon have 
the Swift Hour on NBC to lick your 
chops over. With Sigmund Romberg at 
the musical helm and Deems Taylor 
doing the telling, Tuesdays at 10 00 
promise a full half hour. 

Harvester Cigars has reserved space 



Behind Closed Doors 

(Continued from page 15) 

oyer CBS, 8 o'clock on Thursdays, for 
Victor Arden's orchestra, the Rhythm 
Girls, Teddy Bergman, comedian; Jack 
Arthur, baritone: and Audrey Marsh, 
soprano. Another program we know about 
is one that is already on the air Sundays 
at 9:45 over NBC. It features one Niela 
Goodelle, who sings, and who has been 
such things as a chorus girl to earn her 
right to the adjective "glamorous." 

Another new network star is Gabriel 
Heater who hitched his wagon to the 
Lindbergh trial last spring to make a 
name for himself, lie made his NBC 
debut at 5:45, September 2 1st, and will 
be heard every Saturday and Sunday, 
same time, as a commentator. 

So much for the programs that have 
never before graced the a'irways in the 
form we've mentioned. But about now 
there's more news and much interest cen- 
tered around old shows that you know 
and whose return engagements you've de- 
mantled. 

First we'll take those in the musical 
lineup, and when you're finished with the 
list, you will please note that radio this 
winter will be supplying an adequate 
amount of the country's finest talent. 

Take Lawrence Tibbett, who began 
September 24th singing for CBS audi- 
ences. Last year he was heard over NBC, 
with John B. Kennedy, but this season, 
with the same sponsor, he will do his own 
announcing and may have guest stars. 

Another whose golden voice you've 
probably learned to love is Grace Moore, 
returned September 16th to NBC on 
Monday nights at 9:30. Then — and we 
can hear loud cheers from veteran listen- 
ers^ — Atwater Kent has started a show 
every Thursday at 8:30. The network 
will be CBS, coast-to-coast. 

Chesterfield, Andre Kostelanetz con- 
ducting, will be on the air over CBS, be- 
ginning October 2; Wednesdays with Lily 
Pons, and Saturdays with Nino Martini, 
from nine until nine-thirty. 

Phil Baker has been signed up for 
Sundays at seven-thirty to fill the NBC 
spot on which Will Rogers used to ap- 
pear. 

For the lovers of symphonies, five hours 
so far have been allotted each week. The 
New York Philharmonic on Sundays will 
play two hours, starting at 3:00, over 
CBS. Later the same day (9:00), Ford 
announces, he will give you what may 
turn out to be the Detroit Symphony. 
Though no one has said so, so far, it is 
generally taken for granted (competition 
being what it is) that the General Motors 
Hour of symphony will be with us at the 
same time as Ford. 

T^ON-MUSICAL returning shows are 
^•^ The O'Neills who come back at the 
insistent clamor of thousands — network as 
yet not completely decided — and Walter 
Winchell, whose "back in a flash with a 
flash" will rattle your loudspeaker as usual 
on Sunday evenings. 

We are told that Clara, Lu 'n' Em will 
be chattering mornings again around the 
middle of October. 

Finally, that old bell ringer who was 
CBS's offering opposite Jack Benny last 
year is coming back October 6th. We're 
talking about Alexander Woollcott, whose 
sentimentalities were sponsored by Cream 
of Wheat. It hurts us more than it does 
you to confess that he will be back at 
the same hour, 7:00, Sundays, making it 
impossible to enjoy both his ramblings 
and the Benny gags. 

Now that's over, but don't go away — 
you'll want to know what changes are 



being contemplated on programs now 
broadcasting. 

We've mentioned that Johnny Green 
goes to NBC. Probably you've learned by 
this time that the Ivory Tent Show with 
Charles Winninger has quietly folded its 
tent, and that True Story Hour has 
switched to NBC, Friday nights, 9:30, 
not 8:30. 

If you can't find Easy Aces, it's because 
they've been moved again, this time to 
7:00 Tuesdays. Wednesdays, and Thurs- 
days, putting them in direct competition 
with Amos 'n' Andy. Their sponsor did 
it on purpose, what's more. 

Dangerous Paradise goes coast-to-coast 
just as it has received its six millionth 
fan letter — a record of some sort. 

NBC announces that Al Pearce and his 
gang will move to an evening spot with a 
hall hour sponsored program. 

The Vallee Hour will try condensed 
versions of musical comedies and will 
build up their new funny man, Bobby 
Burns. 

Whiteman's Music Hall will go back to 
featuring guest stars. 

At this point draw a deep breath and 
scan rapidly the programs scheduled by 
the Mutual network, WOR the key station 
in the East. WGN, in the West. 

Here again we venture to mention the 
most promising — a show coming twice a 
week (Tuesdays and Saturdays) at 7:45. 
It will be called Washington-Merry-Go- 
Round and will present the two men, 
Drew Pearson and Robert Allen, who 
wrote the best selling book by the same 
name. Their pertinent comments on the 
national political life will come direct 
from Washington, D. C. 

ALBERT PAYSON TERHUNE starts 
September 29th on a show devoted to 
dog stories. The popular Forum Hour 
starts soon its sixth year on Sunday eve- 
nings. The Bamberger Little Symphony 
moves back into the Thursday night spot 
opposite the Vallee Hour. Also included 
on the winter roster are programs by the 
Chicago Symphony and violin recital by 
Eddy Brown. 

For the lovers of late hour dance music, 
WOR officials have something interesting 
to say. It seems that because NBC and 
CBS are forming their own orchestra de- 
partments, the Music Corporation of 
America will probably use the Mutual 
stations. This means simply that several 
of the most popular dance bands in the 
country will be heard on the air exclu- 
sively over this third network. 

One more — O. E. Mclntyre's Amateur 
Hour will be found broadcasting once 
again on Sundays. This season the show 
will be fully rehearsed each week and no 
attempt will be made to have each act 
sound fresh and untampered with. 

We could go on for hours mentioning 
rumors of programs that are to be sold 
shortly. But we won't. We'll just men- 
tion such names as Thurston, the magi- 
cian, Olsen and Johnson, the comics, and 
maybe Doc Rockwell. They've been 
auditioning and press agents claim they'll 
sign. 

And there's our list. Clip it and slip 
it under a leg of your receiving set. When 
you feel the itch to hear something new, 
something different, or something old, 
refer to it and tune in what you want. 

When we get more flashes, we'll flash 
them to you. Don't forget — it's radio's 
banner year. Be sure to listen. And watch 
for more announcements. 

49 



RADIO MIRROR 



We Have With Us— 



; 



RADIO MIRROR'S 

RAPID 

PROGRAM 

GUIDE 

LIST OF STATIONS 



BASIC 


SUPPLEMENTARY 


WABC 






WADC 


WOOD 


WHEC 


WOKO 


KRLD 


KTSA 


WCAO 


WBIG 


KSCJ 


WNAC 


KTRH 


WSBT 


WGR 


KLRA 


WMAS 


WKBW 


WQAM 


WIBW 


WKRC 


WSFA 


WWVA 


WHK 


WLAC 


KFH 


CKLW 


WDBO 


WSJS 


WDRC 


WDBJ 


KGKO 


WFBIH 


WTOC 


WBRC 


KMBC 


WDAE 


WMBR 


WCAU 


KFBK 


WMT 


WJAS 


KDB 


wcco 


WEAN 


WICC 


WISN 


WFBL 


KFPY 


WLBZ 


WSPD 


WPG 


WGLC 


WJSV 


KVOR 


WFEA 


WBBM 


KWKH 


KOH 


WHAS 


KLZ 


KSL 


KMOX 


WLBW 


WORC 
WBT 


CO AS 


WDNC i 






WALA 


KOIN 


KFBK 


KHJ 


KGB 


KMJ 




KHJ 
KFRC 


KMT 
KWG 


CANADIAN 


KOL 


KERN 




KFPY 


KDB 


CKAC 


KVI 


KHJ 


CFRB 



HOW TO FIND YOUR PROGRAM 

1. Find the Hour Column. (All time given is Eastern Standard 
Time. Subtract one hour for Central Standard time, two for 
Mountain time, three for Pacific time.) 

2. Read down the column for the programs which are in black 

type. 

3. Find the day or days the programs are broadcast directly after 
the programs in abbreviations. 

HOW TO DETERMINE IF YOUR STATION IS ON THE NETWORK 

1. Read the station list at the left. Find the group in which your 
station is included. (CBS is divided into Basic, Supplementary, 

Coast, and Canadian; NBC — on the following pages — into Basic, 
Western, Southern, Coast, and Canadian.) 

2. Find the program, read the station list after it, and see if your 
group is included. 

3. If your station is not listed at the left, look for it in the addi- 
tional stations listed after the programs in the hour columns. 

4. NBC network stations are listed on the following page. Follow 
the same procedure to locate your NBC program and station. 



5 PM. 



6 P.M. 



4 P.M. 



3 P.M. 



12 
NOON 



IPM. 



2RM. 



12:00 

Salt Lake City 
Tabernacle: Sun. 
V 2 hr. WABC and 
network 

Voice of Experi- 
ence: Mod. Tues. 
Wed. Tnurs. Fri. 
J4 hr. WABC 
WCAO WNAC 
WDRC WCAU 
WEAN WJSV 



12:15 

The Gumps: Mon. 
Wed. Fri. M hr. 
Basic minus W T ADC 
WKBW WFBM 
KMBC WFBL 
WSPD WJSV 
WHAS PIub WBNS 
KFAB WCCO 
WHEC WNAC plus 
Coast 



17:30 

Musical Foot- 
notes: Sun. WABC 
WNAC WKBW 
WBBM WKRC 
WHK K R N T 
CKLW KMBC 

WHAS WCAU 

WJAS KMOX 

WJSV WBNS 
WCCO 

"Mary Marlin": 
Mon. Tues. Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. M hr. 
Basic plus Coast 
plus KLZ WCCO 
KSL 



12:45 
"FiveStarJones:" 

Mon. Tues. Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. H hr. 
WABC and net- 
work 



1:00 

Church of the Air: 

Sun. }/ 2 hr. WABC and 

network 

Carlton and Shaw: 

Mon. M WABC and 
network 



1:15 

Alexander Semmler: 

M hr. Mon. WABC 
WCAOWMBRWQAM 
WDBO WSJS WDAE 
WGST WPG WBRC 
WDOD WBIG WTOC 
WNOX KLRA WREC 
WALA WDSU WCOA 
WMBD WDBJ 



1:30 

Eton Boys: Mon. ]4 
hr. WABC and network 
Milton Charles: Tues: 
Y 2 hr. WABC and net- 
work 

Concert Minia- 
tures: Wed. x / 2 hr. 
WABC WADC WOKO 
WCAO WGR CKLW 
WDRC WFBM KMBC 
WCAU WJAS WFBL 
WSPD WJSV WQAM 
WDBO WDAE KERN 
KHJ KOIN KFBK 
KGB KDB KOL 
KFPY KWG KVI 
WGST WPG WLBZ 
WBRC WBT KVOR 
WBNS KRLD KLZ 
WDNC WOWO WBIG 
KTRH WNOX KLRA 
WFEA WREC WALA 
CKAC WDSU KOMA 
WCOA KOH WMBG 
WDBJ WHEC KTSA 
WTOC KWKH KSCJ 
WSBT CFRB WIBX 
WWVA KFH WSJS 
WORC WKBN 



2:00 

Marie, The Little 
French Princess: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
M hr. WABC WNAC 
WBBM WKRC WHK 
CKLW WCAU WJAS 
KMOX WJSV KRLD 
KLZ WDSU WHEC 
KSL KHJ KFBC 
KERN KMJ KFBK 
KDB KWG 



2:15 

The Romance of 
Helen Trent: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
M hr. WABC WNAC 
WKRC WHK CKLW 
WCAU WJAS KMOX 
WJSV KRLD KLZ 
WDSU WHEC KSL 
KHJ KFRC KERN 
KMJ KFBK KDB 
KWG 



2:30 

Between the Book- 
ends: Sun. Mon. Tues. 
Wed. Fri. Y 2 hr. WABC 
and network 
Down by Herman's: 
Sat. }/ 2 hr. WABC and 
network 



2:45 

Happy Hollow: Mon. 

Tues. % hr. WABC and 

network 



3:00 

Philharmonic Sym- 
phony of N. Y.: Sun. 
two hr. WABC WADC 
WOKO WCAO WAAB 
WBBM WHK CKLW 
WDRC WFBM KMBC 
WJAS WEAN KMOX 
WFBL WSPD WMBR 
WQAM WDBO WDAE 
KHJ WGST WPG 
WLBZ WBRC WICC 
WBT WBNS KRLD 
WSMK KLZ WBIG 
KTRH KFAB KLRA 
WSJS WFEA WREC 
WCCO WALA CKAC 
WLAC WDSU WCOA 
WDBJ WHEC KSL 
KWKH KSCJ WMAS 
WIBX WMT WWVA 
KFH WORC WKNB 
WKRC WDNC WIBW 
WTOC KOMA WHAS 
KGKO KOH KOIN 
KVI KOL KGB WDOD 
WNOX KVOR KTSA 
WSBT WHP WOC 
WMBG WKBW 
KERN WCAO WJSV 
KFPY 



Orchestra: Wed. Hhr. 
WABC and network 
Connie Gates: Fri. 
M hr. WABC and 
network 



Football: Sat. }/ 2 hr. 
WABC and network 



3:30 

"Do You Remem- 
ber:" Tues. \i hr. 
WABC and network 



4:00 

Visiting America's 
Little House: Mon. Vt, 
hr.WABC and network 
La Forge Berumen 
Musicale: Wed. y 2 hr 
WABC and network 
The Grab Bag: Fri. }/ 2 
hr. WABC and network 

4:15 

Chicago Varieties: 

Mon. y 2 hr. WABC 
WADC WOKO WCAO 
WKBW WGR WBBM 
WKRC KRNT CKLW 
WDRC WFBM KMBC 
KFAB WHAS WCAU 
WJAS WSPD WJSV 
WMBR WQAM 
WDBO WDAE KHJ 
KDB WGST WPG 
WLBZ WBRC WDOD 
KVOR WBNS KRLD 
KLZ ,WBIG WHP 
KTRH WNOX KLRA 
WFEA WREC WCCO 
WALA CKAC WDSU 
WCOA WMBG 
WDBJ WTOC KWKH 
KSCJ WSBT WMAS 
WIBW CFRB WIBX 
KFH WSJS WORC 
KVI KFPY WBT 

4:30 

Science Service: Tues: 

H hr. WABC and 

network 

Loretta Lee: Thurs. Y 2 

hr. WABC and network 

4:45 

Connie Gates: Tues. 

Vi hr. WABC and 

network 



One of the most 
interesting popular- 
ity rises in daytime 
shows we've seen is 
that of the Mary 
Marlin program. 
Right now, accord- 
ing to one accepted 
chart of listeners, the 
show is ahead of 
such perennial fa- 
vorites as Today's 
Children and Betty 
and Bob. If you 
haven't tuned it in, 
try it — and enjoy its 
highly dramatic situ- 
ations. 



5:00 

Melodiana: Sun. y 2 
hr. WABC WOKO 
WCAO WAAB WGR 
WFBL WBBM WKRC 
WHK KRNT CKLW 
WDRC WFBM KMBC 
WHAS WCAU WJAS 
WEAN KMOX WSPD 
WADC WJSV KFAB 
WCCO WHEC CFRB 
Do Re Mi: Mon. % hr. 
WABC and network 
Loretta Lee: Fri. }4 
hr. WABC and net- 
work 



5:15 

The Instrumental- 
ists: Thurs. K hr. 
WABC and network 



5:30 

Crumit & Sanderson: 

Sun. y 2 hr. WABC 
WADC WOKO WCAO 
WAAB WGR WHK 
CKLW WDRC WFBM 
KMBC WHAS WCAU 
WEAN KMOX WFBL 
WSPD WJSV WICC 
WBNS WDSU KOMA 
WHEC WMAS KTUL 
WIBX WWVA KFH 
WORC 

Jack Armstrong: 

Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. 
Fri. M hr. WABC 
WOKO WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN WMAS 



5:45 

Quartet: Mon. Wed. 

M hr. WABC and 

network 

Tito Guizar: Thurs. 

Sat. k£ hr. WABC 

and network 



October sixth, 
Sunday, another sea- 
son of symphonic 
music officially starts 
with the fall debut 
of the New York 
Philharmonic. As be- 
fore, this program 
will run from 3:00 
until 5:00 or a little 
short of the sched- 
uled two hours. As 
usual, Toscanini will 
take up the baton 
for the opening 
broadcast. 



R O 



D - 



50 



7 P.M. 



RADIO MI RROR 

8P.M. 9 PM. IORM. 



HPM MIDNIGHT 



6 P.M. 



6:00 

Amateur Hour with 
Ray Perkins: Sun. Yi 
hr. WABC WOKO 
WCAO WAAB WKBW 
WBBM WKRC WHK 
CKLW WDRG WFBM 
KMBC WHAS WCAU 
WJAS KMOX WFBL 
WJSV KERN KMJ 
KHJ KOIN KFBK 
KGB KFRC KDB 
KOL KFPY KWG 
KVI WGST WBT 
VVBNS KRLD KLZ 
VVREC WCCO WDSU 
WHEC KSL CFRB 

Buck Rogers: Mod. 
lues. Wed. Thure. M 
hr. WABC WOKO 
WCAO WAAB WKBW 
WKRC WHK CKLW 
WCAU WJAS WFBL 
WJSV WBNS WHEC 

Kaltenborn Edits 

The News: Fri. Yi hr. 
WABC and network 



6:15 

Bobby Benson: Mon. 
Wed. Fri. Mhr. WABC 
WAAB WGR WCAU 
WFBL WLBZ WOKO 
WDRC WEAN WHEC 
WMAS 

Carson Robison:Tues. 
Thurs. K hr. WABC 
WOKO WAAB WGR 
WDRC WCAU WEAN 
WFBL WHEC 



6:30 

Household Music Box: 

Mon. Wed. WABC only 



6:45 

Voice of Experience: 

Sun. Yi hr. WABC 
WADC WCAO WAAB 
W K B W W B B M 
WKRC WHK CKLW 
WDRC WFBM KMBC 
WHAS WCAU WJAS 
WEAN KMOX WFBL 
WSPD WBT WCCO 
WHEC WWVA 



7:03 

Alexander Woollcott: 

Sun. '^ hr. Basic minus 
WADC WEAN WSPO 
plus KRNT KFAB 
KLZ WCCO KSL plus 
coast 

Just Entertainment: 
Mon. Tues. Wed. 
Thu. Fri. Y hr. 
WOKO WNAC WGR 
WDRC WHAS WCAU 
WEAN WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WDBO WDAE 
KFBK KFPY WBRC 
WICC WBT KVOR 
WBNS WOC WDNC 
WREC WALA WCOA 
KOH WMBG KTSA 
CFRB KTUL WIBX 
WS.IS WHEC KLZ 
KOMA WBIG WSBT 
KMBC WLBZ WCAO 



7:15 

Patti Chapin: Mon. '4 
hr. WABC and network 
Vocals by Verrill: 
Tues. M hr. WABC 
and network 
He She, and They: 
Wed. WABC and net- 
work 

Lazy Dan: Fri. J4 
hr. WABC and net- 
work 



7:30 

Phil Baker: Sun. '<J hr. 

WABC and network 
Kate Smith: Tues. 
Wed. Thurs. Y hr. 
Basic minus WSPD plus 
WMBR WGST WBT 
KRLD WDSU WKBN 



7:45 

Boake Carter: Mod. 
Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
\i hr. WABC WCAO 
WNAC WGR WBBM 
WHK CKLW KMBC 
WHAS WCAU WJAS 
KMOX WJSV WBT 
WCCO WDRC WEAN 
KRLD KOMA WFBL 
WKRC 



Football will soon 
hold a nation in 
sway and CBS has 
carefully left its Sat- 
urday afternoon 
schedule open in 
order to relay.to its 
audiences the most 
promising of each 
week's collegiate 
gridiron clashes . . . 
In the line of Wash- 
ington co m m e n ta- 
tors, Kaltenborn 
moved up to six 
o'clock Fridays and 
Frederic William 
Wile again goes off 
the air for a short 
while. ... As we 
mentioned in Behind 
Closed Doors (have 
you read this reveal- 
ing article on new 
fall shows yet?) 
Woollcott the sen- 
timentalist comes 
back the same day 
the Philharmonic 
does, October 6. He 
will have the same 
half hour, 7 to 7:30, 
putting him oppo- 
site that ace come- 
dian, Jack Benny. 



8:00 

Eddie Cantor: Sun. Yi 
hr. (back early in Oct.) 
Guy Lombardo: Mon. 
Yi hr. WABC WOKO 
WCAO WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU WJAS 
WEAN WFBL WJSV 
WHBF WCHS WSCS 
WPG WICC WBT 
WDOD WESG WDNC 
WBIG WHP WNOX 
KLRA WREC WLAC 
WDSU WMAS WSJS 
WMBG WDBJ WIBX 
WORC WHEC KWKH 
WWVA 

Lavender and Old 
Lace: Tues. Yi hr. 
Basic plus KRNT 
KFAB 

Johnnie and the 
Foursome: Wed. Y 
hr. WABC WADC 
WOKO WCAO WNAC 
WGR WBBM WKRC 
WHK KRNT CKLW 
WDRC WFBM KMBC 
KFAB WHAS WCAU 
WJAS WEAN KMOX 
WFBL WSPD WJSV 
WCCO 

Harvester Cigars: 
Thurs. Yi hr. Basic 
plus KRNT KFAB 
WBNS WSMK WCCO 
Socony Sketchbook: 
Fri. Yi hr. WABC 
WOKO WNAC WGR 
WDRC WEAN WICC 
WORC WLBZ WHAS 
tVFBL WHEC WCAU 



8:15 

Emery Deutsch with 
Connie Gates: Wed. 
M hr. WABC and 

network 



8:30 

Pick and Pat: Mon. 
V2 hr. Basic plus 
KFAB WLBZ WICC 
WBT WOWO WHP 
WMBG WHEC WMAS 
WORC 

Packard Presents 
Lawrence Tibbett: 
Tues. Yi hr. Basic plus 
Coast plus Canadian 
plus a supplementary 
network 

Burns and Allen: 
Wed. Yi hr. WABC and 
network. 

Atwater Kent Hour: 
Thurs. Yi hr. Basic plus 
coast plus WGST 
WLBZ WBT KRLD 
KLZ WMBR WREC 
WQAM WCCO WDSU 
KOMA WDBO KSL 
KTSA WDAD W LAC 
Broadway Varieties: 
Fri. Y hr. Basic plus 
WGST WBRC WBT 
WBNS KLZ WCCO 
WDSU WMBG KSL 
WMAS plus coast 



9:00 

Ford Sunday Eve- 
ning Hour: Sun. 1 hr. 

Basic plus supple- 
mentary plus coast 
Lux Radio Theater: 

Mon. one hr. Basic plus 
Coast plus KRNT 
KFAB WQAM WDAE 
WGST WBRC WICC 
WBT WBNS KRLD 
KLZ KTRH KLRA 
WREC WCCO CEAC 
WISN WLAC WDSU 
KOMA WDBJ WHEC 
KSL KTSA CFRB 
WORC WNAX 
Came! Caravan: Tues. 
Thurs. Yi hr. WABC 
and network 
Emery Deutsch: Wed 
Yi hr. WABC and net- 
work 

Hollywood Hotel 

Fri. one hr. Basic Plus 
Coast minus KFPY 
KFBK KDB Plus Sup- 
plementary minus 
WWVA WGLC Plus 
Canadian Plus WOWO 
WGST WBNS KFAB 
WREC WDSU KOMA 
WMBG WMBD KTUL 
WACO WNAX WNOX 
WIBX WKBH 



9:30 

Fred Waring: Tues 
one hr. Basic Plus Coast 
Plus Supplementary 
minus KDB KWKH 
WSBT WWVA Plus 
WGST WBNS KFAB 
WREC WDSU KOMA 
WMBG KTUL WACO 
WNAX WKBN KNOX 
WMBD Plus Canadian 
Marty May: Thurs! 
Yi hr. WABC and net- 
work 

California Melodies 
Sat. Vi hr. WABC and 
network 



Kate Smith loses her 
Thursday sustaining 
hour, but everybody, 
including Kate, is 
glad. You see, she's 
to have a three- 
time-a-week show, 
sponsored, very soon 
at 7:30 . . . Those 
two comics, Block 
and Sully, whose 
radio careers were 
interrupted when 
Ex-Lax went off the 
air after CBS's an- 
nouncement that lax- 
ative accounts would 
soon be taboo, are 
turning down offers. 
It's this way — they 
want to put on their 
own show in their own 
way and until they 
get a contract with 
such a clause they 
won't sign. An old, 
old story, but per- 
haps this time the 
comedians will come 
out on top . . . 



10:00 

Wayne King. Lady 
Esther: Sun. Mon. Y 
hr. WABC WADC 
WOKO WCAO WAAB 
WKBW WBBM 
WKRC WHK CKLW 
WDRC WFBM KMBC 
WHAS WCAU WJAS 
KMOX WFBL WSPD 
WJSV KERN KMJ 
KHJ KOIN KFBK 
KGB KFRC KDB 
KOL KFPY KWG 
KVI WBNS KRLD 
KLZ KFAB WCCO 
WDSU WIBW 
Alemite Hour: Thurs: 
Yi hr. WABC and net- 
work 

Richard Himber with 
Stuart Allen: Fri Yi 
hr. WABC WADC 
WOKO WCAO WAAB 
WKBW WBBM 
WKRC WHK CKLW 
WDRC WFBM KMBC 
KFAB WHAS WCAU 
WJAS KMOX WFBL 
WSPD WJSVJtWGST 
WBT WBNS WCCO 
WDSU WSBT KFH 



10:30 

Benay Venuta: Sun. 
Y, hr. WABC and net- 
work 

The March of Time: 
Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. 
Fri. Y hr. Basic minus 
WGR WJSV plus 
WCCO WDSU KRNT 
KFAB WSPD WISV 
plus coast . 



10:45 

Louis Prima Orches- 
tra: Mon. Thurs. 
WABC and network 



We dropped Wed- 
nesday evening's 
Broadway Varieties 
one month from this 
guide and then 
found out that the 
show was still going 
strong. It wasn't our 
fault, though, the 
company sponsoring 
it had given its can- 
cellation notice, then 
changed its mind 
and put it on Fri- 
days . . . True Story 
Hour has gone to 
the National Broad- 
casting network and 
is broadcasting now 
Friday evenings at 
9:30 . . . Igor Gorin, 
new foreign baritone 
on Hollywood Ho- 
tel, is getting quite 
a bit of publicity 
these days. It must 
be his accent. 



11:00 

Abe Lyman Orches- 
tra: Mon. Sat. WABC 
and network 
Dance Orchestra: 
Fri. WABC and net- 
work 



11:30 

Dance Orchestra: 

Sun. WABC and net- 
work 

Dance Orchestra: 

Mon. WABC and net- 
work 

Dance Orchestra: 
Tues. Sat. WABC and 
network 

Dance Orchestra: 
Wed. Fri. WABC and 
network 



Rebroadcasts For 
Western Listeners: 



11:30 

Pick and Pat: Mon. 
Yi hr. KRNT WFBM 
WHAS KMOX KERN 
KMV KHV KOIN 
KFBR KGB KFRC 
KDB KOL KFPY 
KWG KVI KLZ KSL 
Voice of Experience: 
Wed. Ya, hr. KLZ 
KSL KERN KMJ 
KHJ KOIN KFBK 
KGB KFRC KDB 
KOL KFPY KWG 
KVI 



12:30 

Richard Himber: Fri. 
Yi hr. KERN KMJ 
KHJ KOIN KFBR 
KGB KFRC KDB 
KOL KFPY KWG 
KVI KLZ KSL 



We can't find out 
much about the At- 
water Kent Hour 
that is returning to 
the CBS fold very 
shortly on Thursday 
nights. We do know 
that it will be the 
symphonic type this 
sponsor has always 
featured in the past, 
but we can't learn 
whether he will have 
the same artists week 
by week or guest 
stars. Whatever he 
decides, music lovers 
can depend on a 
very full, very pleas- 
ant thirty minutes . . . 
We've been flashed 
a confidential re- 
port that Lilac Time 
is being token off 
the air . . . Then, 
too, Singing Sam's 
spot at 7:30 must 
change to make 
room for Kate Smith. 
CBS- didn't seem to 
know what would be- 
come of him, when 
that happened. 




51 



RADIO MIRROR 



NOON 



IPM 



2 P.M. 



3P.M. 



4PM. 



5PM 



12:00 

Tastyeast Op- 
portunity Mati- 
nee: Sun. Vi hr 
Network 

Simpson Boys: 
T u e s . Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. Sat. 
X hr. WJZ and 
network 

12:15 

Merry Macs: 

Tues. Wed 
Thurs. Fri. X hr 
Genia Fonaii- 
ova, soprano: 

Sat. X hr. Net 
work 

12:30 

Radio City 
Music Hall: Sun. 
Hour — Network 
Words and 
Music: Tues. 
Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
y 2 hr. WJZ and 
network 



1:00 

Happy Jack: 

Mon. Tues. Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. Sat. 
X hr. WJZ and 
network 



1:15 

The Kilmer 
Family: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. Thurs. 
Fri. H hr. WJZ 
and network 



1:30 

Highlights of 
the Bible: Sun. 
Yi hr. Network 
National Farm 
and Home 
Hour: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. Thurs. 
Fri. Sat. 1 hr. 
WJZ and net- 
work 



2:00 

RCA Hour: Sun. 
1 hr. Basic plus 
Western plus South- 
ern plus coast 



2:15 

Uncle Ned: Sun. 

X hr. WJZ and 

network 



2:30 
NBCMusicGuild: 

Mon. Thurs. one 
hr. WJZ and net- 
work 

Three Flats: Tues. 
Y hr. WJZ and net- 
work 

Playlett: Snt. Y 
hr. WJZ and net- 
work 



LIST OF STATIONS 

BLUE NETWORK 



WJZ 

WEAL 

WMAL 

WBZ 

WBZA 



BASIC 

WSYR KSO 



WESTERN 

WPTF KPRC 



WHAM 

KDKA 

WJR 

WENR 

WGAR 



KOA 
KDYL 



KWK 

WREN 

KOIL 



COAST 

KGO 

KFI 

KGW 



WTMJ 

KSTP 

WWNC 

WKY 

WBAP 



WEBC 
WRVA 
WJAX 
WFLA 
WOAI 
WLS 

KOMO 
KHQ 



WEAF 
WTAG 
WBEN 
WCAE 
WTAM 



KSTP 
WTMJ 



WIOD 
WFLA 
WWNC 



WWJ 
WLW 
WSAI 
WFBR 
WRC 



RED NETWORK 

BASIC 

WGY WEEI 

WJAR KSD 

WCSH WDAF 



WESTERN 

WEBC WKY KVOO 

KPRC WOAI WFAA 

SOUTHERN 

WIS WJAX WSB 

WPTF WMC WSM 

WRVA WJDX WSMB 



CANADIAN 



COAST 



CRCT 



CFCF 



KHQ KGO 

KDYL KHJ 

KOA KGW 



WHO 

WMAQ 

WOW 

WTIC 



WBAP 
KTAR 



WAPI 
WAVE 



KOMO 
KFI 



11:30 

Major Bowes' 
Capitol Fam- 
ily: Sun. one 
hr. WEAF and 
network 



12:15 

Honeyboyand 

Sassafras: 

Mon. Tues 
Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
Sat. X hr- 



12:30 

University of 
Chicago Dis- 
cussions: Sun. 
Vi hr. Network 
Merry Mad- 
caps: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. Saf.. 
Yi hr. Network 



1:00 

Road to 
Romany: Sun. 
Y hr. WEAF and 
Network 



1:15 

Orchestra: Tues. 
Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
X hr. WEAF and 
network 



1:30 

Words and 

Music: Sun. 

Y hr. (network 

listing not 

available) 



1:45 

NBC Music 

Guild: Tues X 

hr. WEAF and 

Network 

Airbreaks: 

Thurs. Y. hr. 

WEAF&network 



2:00 

Bible Dramas: 

Sun X hr. WEAF 
and network 
Revolving Stage: 
Mon. }/ 2 hr. 
Orchestra: Fri. Y 
hr. WEAF and 
Network 



2:15 

Better Speech: 

Sun. X hr. Basic 



2:30 

Temple of Song: 

Sun. Y hr. WEAF 

and Network 

Al Pearce's Gang: 

Mon. Tues. Wed. 
Thurs. Mhr.WEAF 
& network 
Kitchen Party: 

Fri. Y hr. Basic 
plus Western plus 
Coast plus KYW 
KTHS KTBS 



3:00 

The Silver Flute: 

Tues. Y hr. WJZ and 

Network 

Old Skipper: Sat. Y. 

hr. WJZ and network 

3:15 ■" 

Sketch: Wed. X hr. 

Network 

3:30 

Sunday Vespers: Sun. 

Yz hr. Network 
Vaughn de Leath: 

Mon. Thurs. Fri. X, 
hr. WJZ and Network 
Nellie Revell: Tues. 
X hr. WJZ and Net- 
work 

Music Magic: Sat. Y 
hr. WJZ and network 



The Merry Macs 
rate as one of the 
most popular sus- 
tainings. The three 
men in the quartet 
are brothers from 
Minneapolis 
Though we haven't 
room to list it, we 
can give you news 
of change on the 
Butter Scotch show 
at 10:05 in the 
morning. A short 
time back Ralph 
Kirbery whom you 
probably know as 
the Dream Singer 
went on in place of 
Maurice who is ill. 



4:00 

Betty and Bob: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
X hr. Basic minus 
KSO KWCR WREN 
Plus Coast Plus WOAI 
WLW WFAA WTMJ 
KSTP KVOO WKY 
KPRC 

4:15 

Songs and Stories: 

Mon. X hr. Network 
Morin Sisters: Fri. X 
hr. WJZ and network 

4:30 

NBC Radio Guild: Mon. 
one hr. WJZ and Net- 
work 

Piano Recital: Tues . Y 2 
hr. WJZ and Network 
Ray Heatherton: Wed. 
X hr. WJZ and network 

4:45 

General Federation of 
Women's Clubs: Fri. 
X hr. WJZ and Network 



We almost didn't 
make a note of this — 
remember the Gold 
Dust twins? Harvey 
Hindermeyer and Earl 
Tuckerman have 
started another show 
on Friday afternoons 
with Nellie Revell. The 
boys will sing old time 
songs that should 
bring back memories 
and Nellie "vill remi- 
nisce about the good 
old times of the past. 



5:00 

Roses and Drums: Sun. 

Y hr. Basic plus WLW 

KTBS WKY KTHS 

WBAP KPRC WOAI 

Crosscuts from Log of 

Day: Wed. Y hr. WJZ 

and Network 

Piatt and Nierman: 

Fri. X hr. WJZ and 

Network 



5:15 

Jackie Heller: Fri. Sat. 

X hr. Network 



5 30 

Singing Lzdy: Mon. 
Tues, Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
X hr. WJZ WBAL WBZ 
WBZA WHAM- KDKA 
WGAR W.TK WLW 
Goldy and Dusty with 
Nellie Revell: Fri. X hr. 
WJZ and network 



5:45 

Gabriel Heater: Sat. 

Sun. X hr. Basic plus 

WLW 

Little Orphan Annie: 

Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. 

Fri. Sat. X hr. WJZ 

WBZ WBZA KDKA 

WJR WBAL WHAM 

WMAL WRVA WJAX 

WCKY WFLA WIOD 



NATIONAL 



3:00 

Home Sweet Home: 

Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. 
Fri. M hr.^WEAF and 
Network 

Weekend Revue: Sat. 
Yi hr. WEAF and Net- 
work 
3:15 

Vic and Sade: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. Thurs. 
Fri. Basic minus WLW 
plus KYW KFI 
3:30 

Penthouse Serenade, 
Don Mario: Sun. Y 
hr. Basic plus Coast 
Oxydol's Ma Perkins: 
Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. 
Fri. X hr. Basic minus 
WJAR WHO WDAF 
WMAQ WOW— plus 
WKBF WSM WSB 
WAPI WAVE WSMB 
NBC Music Guild: 
Sat. % hr. WEAF and 
network 
3:45 

Dreams Come True: 
Tues. Wed. Thurs. X 
hr. Basic minus WHO 
WDAF WMAO WOW 
Mario Cozzi: Fri. X 
hr. WEAF and Network 

Notes on Al 
Pearce's Gang — Tiz- 
zie Lish, the dizzy 
Home, Beauty and 
Health expert, wears 
a costume for vis- 
ible audiences. True 
to the part, William 
Comstock (Tizzie) 
features a black 
cotton dress, black 
co tto n stockings, 
high black boots. 



4:00 

Willard Robison Or- 
chestra: Sun. X hr. 
WEAF and Network 
Woman's Radio Re- 
view: Mon. Tues Wed: 
Thurs. Fr. WEAF and 
Network Y hr. 



4:15 

Carol Deis, soprano: 

Sat. X hr. WEAF and 
Network 



4:30 

Songs: Sun. X hr. 

WEAF and Network 

Madge Marley: Fri. X 

hr. 

Our Barn: Sat. Yi hr. 

WEAF and Network 



4:45 

Orchestra: Mon. Wed. 
X hr. WEAF and net- 
work 

Adventures in King 
Arthur's Land: Tues. 
Thurs. X, hr. WEAF and 
network 
Orchestra: Fri. Y hr. 



The star of Pent- 
house Serenade, Don 
Mario, could be sit- 
ting right now on a 
Cuban plantation with 
dozens of servants 
fanning away the flies. 
His father, a rich 
planter, wants him to 
take over the business. 



5:00 

America's 1st Rhythm 

Symphony: Sun. Y 

hr. Entire Red Network 

plusWHIO KTHS KTRH 

WIBA KFYR 

Kay Foster, Songs: 

Mon. X hr. Network 

Shirley Howard: Wed. 
Fri. X hr. WEAF and 
N et work 

N't'l Congress Par- 
ents, Teachers Pro- 
gram: Thurs. Y 2 hr. 
Network 



5:15 

Grandpa Burton: Mon. 
Wed. Fri. X hr. WEAF 
and Network 



5:30 

Dream Drama: Sun. 

X hr. Basic minus WHO 

WOW 

Tom Mix Program: 

Mon. Wed. Fri. X hr. 
Basic minus KSD WDAF 
WHO WOW 
Matinee Musicale: 

Thurs. X hr. WEAF and 
Network 



5:45 

Ray Heatherton: Sun. 
X, hr. WEAF and net- 
work 

Stanley High: Tues. 
X hr. Network 



{Please turn to page 5/ t ) 



RADIO MIRROR 




Read 
how 
Mabel 
won lots 
of new 
dates 




Don't let adolescent 
pimples humiliate YOU 

Between the ages of 13 and 25, 
important glands develop. This 
causes disturbances throughout 
the body. Harmful waste products 
get into your blood. These poisons 
irritate the skin — and pimples pop 
out on the face, chest and back. 

Fleischmann's Yeast clears those 
skin irritants out of your blood. 
And the pimples disappear! 

Eat Fleischmann's Yeast 3 times 
a day, before meals, until your 
skin has become entirely clear. 
Start today ! 



—cCeate We s&tt 

by clearing skin irritants 
out of the blood 



53 



RADIO MIRROR 



6PM 



7PM. 



8PM 



9PM 



10PM 



IIPM. 



MIDNIGHT 



6:00 

Canadian Grena- 
diers: Sun. Y hr. 
U. S. Army Band: 

Mon. Y hr. Network 
Martha Mears: 
Thurs. Y. hr. WJZ 
and network 
Orchestra: Fri Y 
hr. Network 



6:15 

Ivory Stamp Club: 

Mon. Wed. Fri. Y, 
hr WJZ WBZ WBZA 
Winnie, The Pooh 

Tues. Thurs. Y hr 
WJZ and network 



6:30 

Grand Hotel: Sun 

Y hr. Basic plus 
Coast plus WTMJ 
KSTP WEBC 
Press Radio News: 

Mon. Tues. Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. Sat. WJZ 
and Network 



6:45 

Lowell Thomas: 

Mon. Tues. Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. Y hr. 
WJZ WGAR WLW 
CRCT WBZ WBZA 
WSYR WBAL 
WHAM WMAL 
WJAX WFLA 
KDKA WJR CFCF 
WIOD WRVA 



RED! 



6:00 

Catholic Hour: Sun. 

i£ hr. Network 

Flying Time: Mon. 

Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fn. 

14 hr. WEAF and 

Network 

6:15 

Mid-week Hymn 

Sing: Tues. Y. hr. 

Network 

Orchestra: Wed. Y 
hr. WEAF and net- 
work 

6:30 

Invitation to the 
Dance: Sun Y2 hr. 
WEAF and Network 
Press Radio News: 
Mon. Tues.Wed. Thurs. 
Fri. Sat. 

6:45 

Billy and Betty: 

Mon. Tues Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. WEAF only 
Merry Macs: Sat. 
Y. hr. WEAF and Net- 
work. 



You're probably 
familiar with the 
names of Bray and 
Braggiotti, for years 
CBS's favorite piano 
team. They've split 
this summer and 
Jacques Fray has 
moved to NBC to 
conduct his own pro- 
gram, Invitation to 
the Dance. You can 
hear it Sundays in 
place of Continen- 
tal Varieties. 



7:00 

Jack Benny with 
Johnny Green's Or- 
chestra: Sun. Y hr. 
Basic Plus Western 
minus WWNC WBAP 
WLS plus WKBF 
WIBA KFYR WIOD 
WTAR WAVE WSM 
WSB WSMB KVOO 
WFAA KTBS WSOC 
WDAY WMC 
Easy Aces: Tues. Wed. 
Thurs. Y hr. WJZ and 
network 



7:15 

Tony and Gus: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. Thurs Fri. 
M hr. WJZ WBAL 
WMAL WBZ WBZA 
WSYR WHAM KDKA 
WCKY WFIL WENR 
WPTF WWNC WIS 
WJAX WIOD WFLA 
WTAR WVR WSOC 
WGAR 



7:30 

Bob Ripley with Ozzie 
Nelson and Harriet 
Milliard: Sun. Y hr. 
WJZ and Network 
Lum 'n' Abner: Mon 
Tues. Wed. Fri. Y 
hr. WJZ WBZ WBZA 
WSYR WENR 
Operatic Gems: Sat. 
one hr. WJZ and net- 
work 



7:45 

Dangerous Paradise: 

Mon. Wed. Fri. Y. hr. 
Basic Plus KTBS WSM 
WSB WFAA WKY 
WLW WHO 



7:00 

K-7: Sun. Y2 hr. WEAF 

and Network 

Amos 'n' Andy: Mon. 

Tues. Wed. Thurs. 

Fri. Y hr. WEAF and 

network 

7:15 

Uncle Ezra's Radio 
Station: Mon. Wed. 
Fri. WEAF and net- 
work 

Popeye, The Sailor: 
Tues. Thurs. Sat. Y 
hr WEAF and network 

7:30 

Sigurd Nilssen, basso 

Graham McNamee: 

Sun. Y< hr. WEAF 
VVTAG WJAR WCSH 
WRC WGY WTAM 
WWJ WSAI WMAQ 
KSD WOW WBEN 
Rhythm Boys: Mon. 
Ya. hr. WEAF and Net- 
work 

Mode Show: Thurs. Y 
hr. Basic minus WBEN 
WFI WEEI WTIC 

7:45 

The Fitch Program: 

Sun. Y hr. Basic minus 
WEEI WDAF dIus 
CFCF KYW WIRE 
You and Your Gov- 
ernment: Tues. Y hr. 
Thornton Fisher: Sat. 
Y hr. WEAF WTIC 
WTAG WJAR WCSH 
KYW WHIO WRC 
WGY WBEN WTAM 
WWJ WMAQ KSD 
WOW WIBA KSTP 
WEBC WDAY KFYR 
WRVA WPTF WTAR 
WSOC WWNC WIS 
WJAX WIOD WFLA 
WAVE WMC WAPI 
WJDX WSMB WSB 
WCAE WSAI WIRE 
WSM 



8:00 

NBC String Sym- 
phony: Sun. % hr 
WJZ and Network 
Fibber Mc Gee and 
Molly: Mon. Yi hr. 
Basic plus WFIL 
WCKY WLS WMT 
Eno Crime Clues: 
Tues. Y hr. Basic 
minus WHAM WENR 
plus WLW WLS 
Life Saver Show : 
Wed. Y hr. Basic 
Nickelodeon: Thurs. 
Yi hr. WJZ and net- 
work 

Irene Rich: Fn. !4 
hr. Basic minus WJR 
WGAR WENR KWK 
plus WLS WSM WMC 
WSB WAVE 



8:15 

Lucille Manners: Fri. 
Y hr. WJZ and Net- 
work 



8:30 

Evening in Paris: 

Mon. Y hr. Basic plus 

WFIL WCKY WLS 

WMT 

Welcome Valley, 

Edgar A. Guest: Tues. 

Yi hr. Basic plus 

WCKY WMT 

House of Glass: Wed. 

Yi hr. Basic minus 

WBZ KWK plus WMT 

WCKY 

Kellogg College 

Prom, Ruth Etting: 

Fri. Yi hr. Basic plus 

WFIL WCKY WMT 



9 00 

Melodious Silken 

Strings Program: 

Sun. Yi hr. Basic plus 
Western minus WTMJ 
KSTP WBAP WEBC 
WOAI plus WLW 
WIOD WAVE WSM 
WSB WMC WJDX 
WSMB WFAA KTBS 
KTHS 

Sinclair Minstrels: 
Mon. Y hr. — Basic 
plus Western plus WSB 
WIBA WDAY KFYR 
WFAA WIS WIOD 
WSM WSMB WJDX 
KTBS KVOO WSOC 
WTAR WMC KOA 
WLW WMT WAPI 
KDYL 

N.T.G. and his Girls: 
Tues. Yi hr. Basic plus 
Coast plus WLW WLS 
WMT 

Our Home on the 
Range, John Charles 
Thomas: Wed. % hr. 
Basic plus Coast plus 
WIRE WMT WCKY 
Death Valley Days: 
Thurs. Yi hr. — Basic 
minus WENR plus 
WLW WLS 
Palmolive Beauty 
Box: Fri. one hr. (net 
work listing unavail- 
able) 
9:30 
Walter Winchell: Sun. 

Y hr. Basic 
Princess Pat Players: 
Mon. Yi hr. Basic 
Helen Hayes: Tues. 

Y hr. Basic 
National Barn Dance: 
Sat. Hour. Basic plus 
WLS WKBF 

9:45 

Niela Goodelle: Sun. 

Y hr. Basic plus 
WCKY 



NATIONAL 



8:00 

Major Bowes Ama- 
teur Hour: Sun. Hour 
Complete Red Net- 
work 

Hammerstein's 
Music Hall: Mon. '-;> 
hr. Basic 

Leo Reisman: Tues. 
Y hr. Basic minus 
WSAI plus Western 
Minus WOAI WFAA 
plus Southern minus 
WRVA WAVE plus 
WKBF WIBA WDAY 
KFYR WSOC WTAR 
One Man's Family: 
Wed. Yi hr. Complete 
Red Network plus 
KTBS WCKY KFYR 
WDAY WIBA 
Rudy Vallee: Thurs. 
Hour Complete Red 
Network plus KFYR 
WDAY 

Cities Service: Fri. 
Hour — Basic minus 
WMAQ plus Western 
plus Coast plus CRTC 
Lucky Strike Pre- 
sents: Sat. one hr. 
Basic plus Western 
plus Coast plus WIBA 
KTBS WMC WSB 
WAPI WJDX WSMB 
WAVE 

8:30 

Voice of Firestone: 

Mon. Y2 hr. Basic 
plus Western minus 
WFAA WBAP KTAR 
plus Southern minus 
WRVA WAPI . plus 
WDAY WKBF WIBA 
KFYR WSOC WTAR 
KTBS 

Lady Esther, Wayne 
King: Tues. Wed. V 2 
hr. Basic minus WFBR 
plus WTMJ KSTP 
WKY KPRC WSM 
WSB WMC WOAI 
WKBF WSMB WBEN 
WTIC WBAP KVOO 



9:03 

Manhattan Merry Go 
Round: Sun. Yi hr. 
Basic plus WTMJ 
KSTP WEBC CFCF 
KFYR plus Coast 
A and P Gypsies: 
Mon. Yi hr. Basic 
Ben Bernie:Tues. Yi hr. 
—Basic plus WTMJ 
KSTP WDAY KFYR 
WMC WSB WBAP 
KTBS KPRC WOAI 
KOA WFI KVOO 
Town Hall Tonight: 
Wed. Hour — Basic plus 
WIS WJAX WIOD 
WSB WTMJ KTBS 
KPRC WOAI KSTP 
WRVA WSMB KVOO 
WKY WEBC WPTF 
WSM WMC 
Show Boat Hour: 
Thurs. Hour — Com- 
plete Red Network 
Waltz Time: Fn. Yi 
hr Basic minus WEEI 
G-Men: Sat. Yi hr. 
Complete Red Network 

9:30 

American Musical 
Revue: Sun. Yi hr. 
Complete Red Network 
Grace Moore: Mon. 
Y hr. Complete Red 
Network 

Ed Wynn: Tues. Y 
hr. Compete Red Net- 
work. 

True Story: Fri. Y 
hr. Basic Plus Coast 
plus WHIO 
Shell Chateau: with 
Al Jolson: Sat. One 
hr. Basic plus Coast 
Plus KYW WHIO 
WIBA KSTP WEBC 
WDAY KFYR WTMJ 
WRVA WPTF WWNC 
WIS WJAX WIOD 
WFLA WTAR WSOC 
KGIR KGHL KFSD 
KTAR KOYL 



10:00 

Sunday Evening at 

Seth Parker's: Sun 

Yi hr. WJZ and net- 
work 

Raymond Knight: 
Mon. 1 hr. WJZ and 
Network 

NBC Symphony Or- 
chestra: Thurs. one 
hr. WJZ and network 



10:30 

Orchestra: Sun. Y 
hr. WJZ and Network 
Heart Throbs of the 
Hills: Tues. Yi hr. 
WJZ and Network 
Meetin' House: Fri. 
Yi hr. WJZ and net- 
work 

Carefree Carnival: 
Sat. Yi hr. WJZ and 
Network 



Wei I , let's see 
what we have in the 
way of new or 
changing shows at 
night . . . Easy Aces 
is back in a night 
spot— 7:00, Blue net- 
work, Tuesdays, 
Wednesdays, Thurs- 
days . . . The Bakers 
Broadcast soon will 
be Robert L. Ripley 
(Believe it or Not) 
with Ozzie Nelson 
and Harriet Hilliard. 



10:00 

Contented Program: 

Mon. Y hr. Basic plus 
Coast plus Canadian 
plus KSTP WTMJ 
WEBC KPRC WOAI 
WFAA KFYR WSM 
WMC WSB WKY 
Swift Hour with Sig- 
mund Romberg and 
Deems Taylor: Tues. 
Y hr. Basic plus 
Western plus Coast 
Log Cabin Show: 
Wed. y 2 hr. WEAF 
and network 
Whiteman's Music 
Hall: Thurs. Hour- 
Complete Red Network 
plus WDAY KFYR 
KTBS KTHS WIBA 
Campana's First 
Nighter: Fri. Yi hr. 
Basic plus Western 
minus KVOO WBAP 
KTAR plus WSMB 
WMC WSM WSB 



10:30 

Ray Noble Orches- 
tra: Wed. Y hr. Basic 
plus KYW WKBF 
plus Coast plus WSM 
WMC WSB WAPI 
WJDY WSMB WAVE 
Mills Brothers: Fri. 
Y hr. Basic plus South- 
ern plus Western plus 
Coast 



More changes on 
present shows- — The 
Hoofinghams, late 
hour quarter hour, 
has become the 
Open Road, story of 



11:00 

Joe Reichman Or- 
chestra: Mon. Y hr. 
Songs: Wed. Yi hr. 
Jewish Program: 
Thurs. Yi hr. 
Ink Spots: Fri. Y 
hr. WJZ and Network 
Orchestra: Sat. Y 2 hr. 

11:15 

Shandor: Sun. Y hr. 

WJZ and Network 

11:22 

Ink Spots: Mon. Fri. 

WJZ and Network 

11:30 

Orchestra: Sun. Yi hr. 
Ray Noble Orches- 
tra: Mon. Yi hr. 
Orchestra: Tues. Hhr 
Orchestra :Thurs. !4hr. 



More of the 
same — Cornelia Otis 
Skinner, who's done 
such a grand job 
this summer pinch 
hitting for Winchell, 
gives way to the 
master gossip col- 
umnist . . . The Kel- 
logg College Prom 
continues with Ruth 
Etting who wants to 
quit and can't be- 
cause of the de- 
mand for her . . . 
And Palmolive, 
changed to Friday 
nights, continues to 
be popular. 



tBLUE 



11:00 

Orchestra: Mon. Yi 
hr. Network 
Orchestra: Wed. Y hr. 
John B. Kennedy: 
Thurs. Y hr. 



11:15 

Orchestra: Mon. Y 

hr. Network 



11:30 

Orchestra: Mon. Wed. 
Fri. Y hr. Network 
National Radio 
Forum: Thurs. Y 
hr. Network _ 



11:45 

The Open Road: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. Fri. Y 
hr. WEAF and Net- 
work 



kids on the bum 
written by a boy in 
his teens who walked 
and rode the rails 
from Chicago to the 
West Coast to get 
the story . . . Like 
Fred Astaire's danc- 
ing on the Lucky 
Str i ke program? 
Maybe if you write 
saying so, you'll get 
him back on a re- 
turn engagement. 



54 



RADIO MIRROR 



THE SINGING LADY 



Asks your CO-OPERATION 



I AM sure that every one who 
loves children will be interested 
in this unusual offer. 

You see, as the Singing Lady 
I have been telling stories over 
the radio to children five days 
a week for the past five years. 
In that time I have written and 
told over a thousand stories. 
Now I am eager to have your co- 
operation in obtaining new ideas 
for new story material. And I 
am sure that there are many 
wonderful stories that you tell 
your children, or have read, or 
know about that will bring joy 
and pleasure to little folks who 
listen to the Singing Lady. Won't 
you send those ideas to me ? 

My sponsor, the Kellogg Com- 
pany, has very generously offered 
$9000 in cash prizes for the best 
letters that are sent in to me. 



Doesn't that make you want to 
get busy at once? And don't 
forget that your letter may not 
only win a large cash prize — 
but it will help make millions of 
children happier! 

Please write me a letter telling 
the kind of stories you think chil- 
dren like best. Or give a brief 
suggestion for new story ideas — 
the kind your children — or chil- 
dren you know — enjoy most. It 
isn't necessary to write a com- 
plete story — just send in ideas — 
plots of stories — or even a letter 
containing suggestions for Sing- 
ing Lady programs. 

Your interest and help will be 
very sincerely appreciated. 



THE SINGING LADY 



NO TOPS TO SEND — NO LABELS— NO BOTHER! 




$ 



10,000 



IN CASH 
PRIZES 



The Kellogg Company is very happy to 
co-operate with the Singing Lady in her 
quest for new ideas by offering $10,000 in 
cash prizes. 

Few radio programs have ever appealed 
to a larger and more loyal audience. The 
Singing Lady has been voted the best chil- 
dren's radio entertainment for the past two 
years in a poll of radio editors conducted 
by the New York World-Telegram. This 
year the Singing Lady received the Radio 
Stars' Award for distinguished service to 
radio. In addition, more than two million 
fan letters have been received. 

The Kellogg Company believes with the 
Singing Lady that the mothers and those 
who love children can help materially in- 
making these programs even more inter- 
esting and enjoyable to little folks. 

Three kinds of letters can win prizes: 

1. A letter with ideas for new stories. 

2. A letter telling what kind of stories 
children like best. 

3. A letter giving constructive sugges- 
tions and ideas for the Singing Lady's 
program. 

Make your letter any of these three types. 
The cash prizes will be paid for the letters 



that are the most helpful to the Singing 
Lady. As there are 1033 cash prizes, there 
is a fine chance for you to win one of them. 
You can hear the Singing Lady over the 
N. B. C. Basic Blue Network — also in 
Toronto and Montreal. See your news- 
paper for time and station. Also, you will 
find some of the Singing Lady stories in 
condensed version printed on the backs of 
Rice Krispies packages. These are very 
helpful in writing your letter. 

Let your children enjoy the stories on the 
packages. They are an extra value when 
you buy Kellogg's Rice Krispies — the deli- 
cious cereal that snaps, crackles and pops 
in milk or cream. Your grocer sells Rice 
Krispies. Made by Kellogg in Battle Creek. 



3. Prizes will be awarded for the letters that are 
the most helpful to the Singing Lady. Any one of 
three types can win: (1) a letter with ideas for new 
stories; (2) a letter telling what kind of stories 
children like best; (3) a letter giving constructive 
suggestions and ideas for the Singing Lady's 
programs. 

4. All suggestions submitted become the property 
of the Kellogg Company. 

5. Contest closes October 26, 1935. Letters post- 
marked later than this date not accepted. 

6. Send your letter to the Singing Lady, Kellogg 
Company, Box 8, Battle Creek, Michigan. 



HERE ARE THE PRIZES 

$1000 for the best letter . . . 

600 for second best letter . . 

400 for third best letter . . 

100 for next ten best letters . 

50 for next twenty best letters 

5 for next 1000 best letters 

Total 



$1000 

600 

400 

1000 

1000 

5000 

$9000 



HERE ARE THE RULES 

1. Any one can submit a letter excepting em- 
ployees and members of employees' families of the 
Kellogg Company and their advertising agents. 

2. Put the name of your grocer or the store man- 
ager on your letter. If you win one of the big 
prizes he will win one too. 



$1000 IN PRIZES FOR 
GROCERS 

Tn recognition of the co-operation of grocers in 
displaying Rice Krispies and explaining this offer, 
we will give the following prizes to the grocers 
whose customers win prizes: First prize, $300; 
second prize, $200; third prize, $50: next ten, 
$25 each, $250; next twenty, $10 each, $200; 
total, $1000. 




2r RICE KRISPIES 






55 



RADIO MIRROR 



most famous of the guest stars have not 
been at home on the air and have not 
measured up to others. But the plays 
are always excellent. Most of them I have 
seen on the stage, of course. The recent 
"Lightning" took me back, far too many 
years, to Frank Bacon . . . and Helen 
Hayes' interpretation of "Bunty Pulls 
the Strings" reminded me of when I had 
seen my friend Mollie Pearson in the 
same delightful role. And I may as well 
say here that Helen Hayes could recite 
the alphabet and 1 would sit in an easy 
chair with a beatific smile and know that 
I was listening to music. 

I suppose I must talk about amateur 
hours. Well, I don't like 'em. That's 
flat and I'm sorry but I don't. Much as 
I like Ray Perkins in his own person I 
don't like his amateurs and, much as I 
admire Major Bowes for his fine work on 
the air, I don't like his, either. I feel 
uneasy, embarrassed. The "spontaneity" 
doesn't seem spontaneous to me. It all 
has a rehearsed air. The amateurs don't 
seem quite amateur or quite professional. 
1 know that these hours are the most 
popular on the air and I can understand 
that. Half of the people listening can say 
to themselves, "If he or she gets away 
with it why can't 1?" And the public loves 
a finger in any pie — hence the rush to 
vote. But frankly, I like my entertain- 
ment professional and that's that. Some 
of our future great entertainers may come 
via the amateur hour, but not many. 
Most of them have come from allied pro- 
fessions or have started in at small 
stations. And I don't like the idea of 
capitalizing on the fact that the amateur- 
hour amateur may be an iceman, a gar- 
bage gentleman, a dressmaker or coffee-pot 
owner or what have you. This creates at- 
mosphere, of course, and I am not trying 
to be funny about garbage — but it annoys 
me. The person is either good or he is 
not. I don't give a hoot what he does 
in private life. And the amateur craze 
has come to a point where I have to 
avoid my neighborhood motion picture 
houses on certain evenings for fear of 
being faced with amateurs. I am as em- 
barrassed for most of them as I used to 
be when my best friends forgot their 
lines at Sunday School entertainments. 
And on the air the sound of the gong, or 
its equivalent, although I may have 
yearned for it, similarly afflicts me. 

AS for the commentators, 1 listen to 
them all. Lowell Thomas particu- 
larly is a habit with me. Since news com- 
mentators are no longer able to give us 
real spot news I no longer listen to them 
for information but because I like to get 
their particular slant on things. You can 
listen to three in an evening and find that 
each differs in placing the evening's em- 
phasis upon one special item. 

For brand new news I go to the press 
bulletins, of course. And for human 
angles 1 listen to John B. Kennedy who 
can say more in less time than anyone 
on the air . . . not excepting Mr. Floyd 
Gibbons who says it with such rapidity. 

Poetry on the air bothers me. Occa- 
sionally I do hear a fine voice reading 
poetry as it should be read without too 
many frills. Basil Ruysdale's is an out- 
standing example of this. 

1 always like to listen to Jessica Drag- 
onette. Her voice is pure disembodied 
song. 

Now and then a good spy story stirs 
me up. I used to like the dramatizations 
of medical science which were once on the 
air. I enjoy, when my work permits me 

56 



What Radio Means to Me 

(Continued from page 19) 

to listen, Dr. Harris' Famous Babies talks 
on Columbia. 

If I do not listen to many afternoon 
programs, my children do. The chil- 
dren's tastes differ. There is a girl, just 
eleven, and there are twins, a boy and a 
girl, eight. It is astonishing how much 
tastes do differ when difference in ages is 
so negligible. The older girl likes 
dramas and while she enjoys reading mys- 
teries suitable to her age she does not 
like them as well on the radio. The 
younger ones like the mysteries for chil- 
dren. All like adventure. Each differs 
in musical taste and the older girl likes 
Roses and Drums which bores the younger 
ones. 

One of the children was recently con- 
verted to music. A couple of years ago 
when he was ill — before he had his own 



Radio Mirrors Big Sister— 

MOVIE MIRROR 
-Is On the Air! 

Don't miss this great program, you 
eastern listeners, every Friday 
night from 7:30 to 8:00. There'll 
be guest stars from the movie and 
radio worlds, all the latest news 
from Hollywood, and the finest 
musical talent available. Dial in 
on any of the following stations: 

WMCA, New York, N. Y. 
WIP, Philadelphia, Pa. 
WDEL, Wilmington, Del. 
WCBM, Baltimore, Md. 
WOL, Washington, D.C. 
WMEX, Boston, Mass. 
WPRO, Providence, R.I. 
WLNH, Laconia, N.H. 

Don't forget the time: 7:30 to 
8:00 on Friday nights — so better 
be listenin'! 



radio — we put a small receiver in _ his 
room and found music for him. A little 
later I heard a horrible noise and went in 
to find him. hands folded on his chest, 
beatifically listening to a French lesson. 
When I asked him why, he said briefly 
that he liked talkin' and didn't like music. 
That has been changed now as one of his 
pet programs has a cowboy song signa- 
ture which he adores. He says it is the 
finest music in the world. I think the 
program is Bobby Benson. That and 
Buck Rogers and Dick Tracy seem to be 
prime favorites. 

BHAVE no quarrel with children's pro- 
grams. When my children go around 
singing "Home on the Range" I think it's 
grand. Recently they picked up "The 
Man on the Flying Trapeze" with as- 
tounding results. 

Although 1 don't share many people's 
concern about mystery programs which 
supposedly frighten children, I do deplore 
some of the unrelated-to-life programs 
which children listen to, and Buck Rogers 
has given me many a bad hour explain- 



ing that no, these things don't happen and 
that it wouldn't be wise to try and fly 
out of a second story window. But I 
think that children are far more intel- 
ligent than we give them credit for being 
and that things soon assume a proper 
proportion in their minds. 1 think that 
the programs which place a lot of stress 
on impossibly good or impossibly heroic 
children make a mistake. I dislike all 
sweetness and light programs for chil- 
dren as much as I do for myself. And 
that goes for Mr. Tony Wons, whose 
voice at one time fascinated me even 
though I wasn't taking in the sense of 
what he was saying. 

I think history could be very dra- 
matically and well handled on the radio. 
Roses and Drums makes an attempt at 
this but it is so very much fictionized. 
History should be as accurate as pos- 
sible. 

I wonder why geography wouldn't go 
over in this way! It might be done in 
the form of really exciting travelogues by 
people who know the countries of which 
they speak; there could be background 
music and even, at the end of the pro- 
gram, a child of that country to speak a 
few words to the children of this country. 
That is the sort of program which, if 
well worked out, would make for inter- 
national good feeling among youth. 

MY objection to most history and war 
programs for children is that they 
tend to glorify war, to place the emphasis 
on bugles and bravery and glory and not 
on mud and waste and misery and long 
despair. I'd like to listen to frontier 
programs, programs of the pioneer, pro- 
grams of building and not of destruc- 
tion. 

As for serious music, I am one of those 
dreadful, unspeakable, terrific, ought-to- 
be-shot people who do not like sympho- 
nies and opera and most all chamber 
music. But I do like the quiet semi- 
classical music of a fine orchestra. I 
would travel miles to hear a harp. I de- 
test piano by itself no matter who plays 
it. I am fond of 'cello and violin. And 
when they all come together in what 
seems to me a harmonious understanding 
I can listen by the hour. 

I like the Goldman Band Concerts and 
I very much enjoy the Canadian Grena- 
dier Guards music, good programs and 
fine conductors. 

It is frequently mentioned that the 
lack of advertising on the overseas sta- 
tions is a pleasant change. This is true 
in one sense but the fact remains that 
these programs are not as good as our 
own, and we have advertising to thank 
for the excellence of our radio entertain- 
ment. Therefore I have no complaint 
against commercials. It is just that I 
often wish much of the advertising were 
shorter or more attractively presented. 

What has become of Charlie Hamp? 
And why couldn't Mark Hellinger have 
been provided with a program commen- 
surate with his potential qualities as an 
entertainer? And are other people 
afflicted with King Herod complexes when 
children take the air in long hours of 
song and prattle? And I still miss Main 
Street, but am partially consoled by the 
Dream Drama program. 

Radio may not be perfect. But it has 
something for everyone. And you can 
take it or leave it. You can walk out 
when ever you like and return when it 
pleases you. Personally, I owe it a lot! 

And now I think I'll turn on the radio 
and eat my hmch. 



RADIO MIRROR 



Radio Mirror's Directory 

(Continued from page 7) 



FERDINANDO, Angelo. Orchestra leader; born 
Formia, Italy, May 23. 1897; unmarried. N. Y. 
FIDLER, Jimmy. Hollywood gossip-columnist; born 
St. Louis, Mo.. Aug. 24, 1900; formerly married to 
Dorothy Lee. actress; debut in Hollywood, August, 
1933. L. A. 

FIELDS, George. Comedian, plays "Honeyboy ra 
"Honeyboy and Sassafras"; born Goodsprings, Mo.; 
March 27. 1894; married Hope O'Carroll; debut over 
KGKO. Texas. 1928. N. Y. 

FISHER, Thornton. Sports commentator; born Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, April 8, 1890; married Laura Marie 
Fisher; one child; debut over WEAK, June, 1923. 
N. Y. 

FLYNN, Bernardine. Actress, "Vic and Sade" ; born 
Madison, Wis., Jan. 2, 1904; married Dr. C. C. 
Doberty; debut over NBC, 1930. CHIC. 
FONARIOVA, Genia^ Soprano, "Samovar Serenade ; 
born Odessa, Russia, March 22; widow; debut over 
NBC, 1927. N. Y. 

FORSTER. Gertrude. Contralto, "Tone Pictures ; 
born Bethlehem, Pa., June 10, 1905; widow; one 
daughter: debut in Philadelphia, 1922. N. Y. 
FOSTER, Harry. Tenor, "Al Pearce and his Gang"; 
born St. Joseph, Mo., Dec 7. 1908; unmarried; debut 
over KFWB, Los Angeles, 1931. N. Y. 
FOSTER, Kay. Singer; born Dallas. Tex.; May 3, 
1910; unmarried; debut over NBC, November, 1934. 
N. Y. 

FRAWLEY, Tim. Actor, "Death Valley Days"; 
born Washington. D. C, Nov. 8; married Lilla 
Campbell, actress; one son; debut in New York City, 
1928. N. Y. 

FRCMAN, Jane. Contralto: born St. Louis, Mo.. 
Nov. 10. 1907; married Don Ross; debut over WLW, 
Cincinnati. N. Y. 

FRCME. Anthony. "The Poet Prince"; horn Bel- 
lairc. Ohio, Sept. 14, 1905: unmarried. N. Y. 
GALLICCHIO, Joseph. Orchestra leader, "Welcome 
Valley"; born Chicago, Jan. 30. 1896; married Effie 
Jane Clark; debut over WEBH, Chicago. 1922. CHIC. 
GAYLORD, Charles. Orchestra leader. "Penthouse 
Serenade"; born Parkersburg. W. Va., June 27, 1906; 
married Beryl Williams; debut over KDKA, Pitts- 
burgh. 1924. CHIC. 

GIBBONS, Floyd. News commentator: "Headline 
Hunter"; born Washington. D. C, July 17, 1887. 
N. Y. 

GILMAN, Page. Actor, "One Man's Family"; born 
San Francisco, April 18, 1918; debut in San Francisco, 
1927. SAN F. 

GIRARD, Armand. Basso; born Clyde. Kan., May 2. 
1900; married Mary P. Lecuyer; two daughters; debut 
in San Francisco over NBC. 1927. N. Y. 
GLEN, Irma. Organist; born Chicago. Aug. 3; mar- 
ried Ted Hill; debut over KYW, Chicago, July 17, 
1922. CHIC. 

GORDON, Elsie May. Actress. "Tony and Gus" ; 
born Anderson. Ind. ; married; one son; debut in New 
York City, 1922. N. Y. 

GOSDEN, Freeman F. Actor, plays "Amos" in 
"Amps 'n' Andy"; born Richmond, Va.. May 5, 1899; 
married Leta Scbreiber. Tune. 1927; one son. one 
daughter; debut over WON. Chicago, 1929. CHIC. 
GOULD. Morton. Pianist, partner of Bert Shelter; 
born Richmond Hill, N. Y., Dec. 10. 1913; unmarried; 
debut over WOR. Newark, 1923. N. Y. 
GREENWALD. Joseph. Actor, "House of Glass"; 
born New York City, Sept. 9. 1892; married: debut 
with Fannie Brice, 1932. N. Y. 

GRIGGS, John. Actor, "Roses and Drums": born 
Evanstbn. 111.. May 19. 1908; married. N. Y. 
GUEST, Edgar A. Poet; born Northampton. England, 
Aug. 20, 1881; married Nellie Crossman; one son, 
one daughter. CHIC. 

GUY, Carleton. Actor. "Uncle Ezra's Radio Sta- 
tion": born Worthington, Ind.. April 10. 1877; mar- 
ried Elsie May Fowler; one sou, one daughter; debut 
over WAAF. Chicago, 1931. CI1IC. 
HAENSCHEN, Gus. Orchestra leader; born St. 
Louis. Mo., Nov. 3; married; one son; debut in New 
York City, 1924. N. Y. 

HALE, Travis. Singer, member Three Cheers Trio, 
"Al Pearce and his Gang"; born Kansas City, Mo., 
July 27, 1907; married Renee Winkler; debut, 1926. 
N. Y. 

HALL, Don. Novelty singer: born Norwood. Ohio. 
May 26. 1905; married nortense Rhodes; debut over 
first station in Cincinnati. N. Y. 

HALL, Wendell. Singer and composer, "Fitch Pro- 
gram"; born St. George, Kan., Aug. 23. 1896; married 
Marion Martin; two sons; debut over KYW, Chicago. 
1921. CHIC. 

HAMILTON, Jessie, Pearl and Vi. Singers. Three X 
Sisters Trio: all born in Cumberland. Md. ; Jessie. 
March 2. 1908: Pearl. Nov. 10. 1904; Vi. Jan 9 1910 
Pearl is married to Edward Santos; Tessie and Vi are 
unmarried. N. Y. 

HANNA, Phil. Singer, member Three Cheers Trio, 
'Al Pearce and His Gang": born Illinois. October, 
1910: married Ruth Porter: debut. 1928. N Y 
HANNEN, Mar'orie. Actress. "Ma Perkins"' etc ■ 
born Hamilton. Ohio. Aug. 28. 1911; unmarried ;' debut 
over WLW, Cincinnati. 1930. CHIC 
HARBACH. Otto. Orchestra leader and composer; 
horn Salt Lake Cljy, Utah. Aug. 18. 1873: married 
Ella Smith Dotigall ; two sons; debut over NBC, Jan. 

HARRIS, Arlene. Comedienne. "Al Pearce and His 
Gang": horn July 7: married Dr. H. G. Harris; debut 
over KFWB. Los Angeles. 1933. NY 
HARRIS, Tommy Tenor. "Carefree Carnival": born 
San Francisco Calif.. Dec. 11. 1911: married: debut 
over KrKL, San Francisco, January. 1929. SAN F. 
HARRISON, Joan. Singer, member Tune, Joan and 
Jerl Trio. "Breakfast Club": born Hollywood. Calif 
P<^l-?, 191S; unmarried; debut in Chicago. April. 1935. 
CHIC. 

HARRISON. June. Singer, member Tune. Toan and 
Ten Trio. "Breakfast Club": born Hollywood. Calif. 
Jan. 16. 1917; unmarried; debut in Chicago, April. 

HASSELL, Leone Ruth. Singer, Verne, Lee and 
Mary Trio, "National Barn Dance"; born Racine. 
Wis., Aug. 11, 1914; unmarried; debut over WEJN 
Racine. CHIC. 

HASSELL, Verne Lucylle. Singer, Verne, Lee and 
Mary Trio; born Racine, Wis.. April 25, 1913; un- 
married; debut over WRJN, Racine. CHIC. 
HAUSER, Johnny. Tenor, "Paul Whiteman's Music 
Hall"; "Lucky Strike Hit Parade"; born New York 
City, 1910; unmarried; debut with Paul Whiteman. 

HAYES, Grace. Soprano; born San Francisco. Calif., 
Aug. 23; married; one son; debut over NBC, 1929. 
N. v 



How he became the 
best-dressed baby in town 



As told by \ 
.Danny's Mother J jm 



Little Judy was taking 
a sun bath with my 
Danny. That's how this 
thing started. Judy's 
diaper was so much 
whiter than Danny's, it 
made him look like a 
poor relation. "How 
come, Hazel?" I asked 
Judy's mother. "/ work 
harder than you, but your 
clothes are whiter " 





"Danny, you get Judy 
out of your hair," Hazel 
grinned back. "And tell 
your mother that she 
works hard enough, but 
her soap is lazy. It just 
doesn't wash out ALL 
the dirt. So her clothes 
are only half-clean — and 
that's why they have that 
tattle-tale gray look." 



It sounded pretty sen- 
sible to me, so I took 
Hazel's advice and 
changed to her soap — 
Fels-Naptha. Glory, 
what a difference ! That 
marvelous golden soap is 
so chuckful of naptha that 
dirt almost flies out. In 
no time at all, my clothes 
were a gorgeous white 
again. 




And now look at Dan- 
ny — he's the best-dress- 
ed baby in town. His 
clothes, and everything 
else in my wash, look 
simply grand. What's 
more, they're safely 
clean. Fels-Naptha is so 
gentle I use it for my 
very best silk undies. 
And it's wonderfully 
easy on my hands, too! 



Banish "Tattle -Tale Gray" 

with FELS-NAPTHA SOAP! 



57 



RADIO MIRROR 




EYES,rUjDpA. 
SAY KISS ME" 

Men love seductive EYES 
framed by long, lovely lashes 

WHY neglect your lashes? You can 
make them truly beautiful in 40 
seconds — vastly improving your appear- 
ance — by merely darkening them with 
Winx Mascara. 

One application works wonders, I pro- 
mise — a magic change, giving your face 
a new and mysterious charm. You'll be 
admired as "the girl with beautiful eyes." 

iTlakfi -up mjuAi leqim 
uriik ipjrn. su^qa 

I present Winx Mascara in two con- 
venient forms— Winx Emollient (cake) and 
Winx Creamy Liquid (bottle). You can ap- 
ply Winx perfectly, instantly, easily with 
the dainty brush that comes with each 
package. Each form is the climax of years 
of pioneering in eye beautification — each 
is smudge-proof, non-smarting, tear-proof 
— each is scientifically approved. 

Buy whichever form of Winx Mascara 
you prefer today. See how quickly Winx 
glorifies your lashes. Note its supe- 
riority — refuse any substitute. And think of 
it — long, lovely lashes « *. 

are yours so inexpen- I • /J/ 

sively, so easily. JL/AXXM, \J\frtA. 

WINX 



Winx Cake Mascara 
—for years the most 
popular form of all. 
So easy to apply. Its 
soothing emollient 
oils keep lashes soft, 
silky. 



AT 

100 

STORES 



Winx Creamy Liq- 
uid Mascara. Ab- 
solutely waterproof. 
Ready to apply. 
No water needed. 
The largest selling 
liquid mascara. 




HAYS, Harvey. Narrator and actor, "Words and 
Music", etc.; born Greencastle, Ind., March 14; mar- 
ried; one daughter; debut in New York City, 1928. 

HAYTON, Lennie. Orchestra leader, "The Hit 
Parade"; born New York City, Feb. 13, 1908; mar- 
ried Babs Busing; debut with Paul Whiteman. N. Y. 
HEALY, Captain Tim. Narrator, "Ivory Stamp 
Club": born Australia. N. Y. 

HEARN, Sam. Comedian, plays "Sam Schlepper- 
man" on Jack Benny program ; born New York City, 
March 5, 1900; married Helen Eley ; debut in New 
York City. 1934. N. Y. 

HEATHERTON, Ray. Baritone; born Jersey City, 
N. J., June 1, 1909; unmarried; debut over WABC, 
1929. N. Y. 

HECTOR, Louis. Actor, plays "Holmes" in "Sher- 
lock Holmes" sketches; born England, March 19; 
married; debut over WJZ, New York City; 1924. 
N. Y. 
HELLER, Jackie. Tenor; born Pittsburgh, Pa., May 

1, 1908; unmarried; debut over WENR, Chicago, 1932. 
CHIC. 

HERMAN, Sam. Xylophonist ; born New York City, 
May 7, 1903; married Alma Knoepfle; debut over 
WEAF, 1921. N. Y. 

HERRICK, John. Baritone; born Boston, Mass., 
Dec. 10, 1908; unmarried; debut over WEEI, Boston, 
1926. N. Y. 

HILLIARD, Harriet. Singer, born Des Moines, Iowa, 
1911; unmarried; debut with Ozzie Nelson's orches- 
tra. 1931. N. Y. 

HITZ, Elsie, Actress, "Dangerous Paradise", etc. ; 
born Cleveland, Ohio, July 21, 1902; married; one 
daughter; debut over WEAF. 1927. N. Y. 
HOFFA, Portland. Comedienne. "Town Hall To- 
night": born Portland. Ore., Jan. 25. 1910; married 
Fred Allen; debut on Allen program, 1932. N. Y. 
HOLDEN, Jack H. Announcer, "National Barn 
Dance"; born Alba, Mich., Oct. 21, 1907; married Jean 
Hawks; one son, one daughter; debut over WWJ, 
Detroit. CHIC. 

HOLMAN Sisters. Piano duo; Betty Jane, born 
Pittsburgh, Pa., July 27: Virginia in Illinois, Dec. 
24; neither is married: debut over KSD. St. Louis. 
N. Y. 

HOPE, Douglas. Actor, "Princess Pat Players": 
born Philadelphia, Pa,, Oct. 31, 1893; married Islea 
Margaret Olerich : one son, one daughter; debut over 
WLS, Chicago, 1929. CHIC. 

HOPPER (William), De Wolfe. Monologist; born 
New York City, March 30. 1858; formerly married; two 
sons; debut over NBC. 1934, Write him care station 
WDAF. Kansas City. Mo. 

HORLICK, Harry. Orchestra director, "A. & P. 
Gypsies"; born Cheriniow, Russia, July 20, 1896; un- 
married: debut over WEAF. March, 1923. N. Y. 
HOWARD, Eunice. Actress. "Music at the Haydn's"; 
born Moulton, Iowa, Dec. 22; unmarried; debut over 
WHO, Des Mnines, Iowa, 1931. N. Y. 
HOWARD, Shirley. Blues singer; born Brooklyn, 
N.Y., July 22. 1911: unmarried; debut over WCAU, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 1932. N. Y. 

HOWARD, Tom. Comedian, "Rudy Vallee Variety 
Hour" : born Newtown Stewart, County Tyrone, Ire- 
land, June 16, 1885; married Hariet Berg, actress; 
one son, one daughter; debut on Chesterfield program, 
Tanuary. 1932. N. Y. 

HUFSMITH, Fred. Tenor, "Two Seats in the Bal- 
cony"; born Bethlehem. Pa., Jan. 5. 1899; unmarried; 
debut over WFT. Philadelphia. N. Y. 
HULL, Warren. Announcer and master-of-cere- 
monies; born Jasport, N. Y.. Jan. 17, 1903. N. Y. 
HUNT, Arthur B. Baritone; born Fargo, N. D., Feb. 

2. 1890; unmarried; debut over NBC. June. 1922. N. Y. 
IDELSON, Billy. Actor, "Vic and Sade"; born 
Forest Park, 111., Aug. 21, 1920; debut in Chicago. 
1931. CHIC. 

ISLES, J. Harrison. Music director, "Cheerio" ; 
born Montgomery, N. Y. ; debut over NBC, 1930. 
N. Y. 

JAMES, Lewis. Tenor: born Ypsilanti. Mich.; debut 
over WTZ, New York City. October. 1921. N. Y. 
JASTROW, Joseph. Psychologist, "The Herald of 
Sanity"; born Warsaw, Poland. Jan. 30, 1863; 
widower; one son (adopted). N. Y. 
JEPSON, Helen. Soprano, "Paul Whiteman's Music 
Hall": born Titusville, Pa., Nov. 28. 1906; married 
George Possell ; one daughter: debut with Paul White- 
man. 1933. N. Y. 

JOHNSON. Bess. Actress. "Today's 
born Elkins. W Va. ; married Dr. S. P. 
daughter. CHIC. 

JOHNSON, Hardesty. Tenor. "Fireside 
born Boston. 1899; unmarried; debut 
City. 1927. N. Y. 
JOLSON, AI. Comedian and singer; born St. Peters- 
burg. Russia. Mav 26, 1886; married Ruby Keeler; 
debut November. 1932. L. A. 

JONES, Josenh Richardson. Actor. "Life of Uncle 
Ned"; born Atlanta, Ga., Jan. 12, 1900; unmarried; 
debut over WRGA. Rome. Ga., January. 1934. CHIC. 
JORDAN, Jim. Comedian, partner of Marion Jordan, 
"Smackout": born Peoria, 111., Nov. 16 1896; mar- 
ried Marion, 1918: one son, one daughter; debut, 1924. 
CHIC. 

JORDAN. Marion. Comedienne, partner of Jim 
Jordan. "Smackout"; born Peoria, 111., 1897; debut, 
1924. CHIC. 

KARINA, Lea. Soprano, "Continental Varieties"; 
horn Finland, Feb. 28. 1909; unmarried; debut in New 
York City, March. 1934 N. Y. 

KEARNS, Bill. Singer. Sizzlers Trio: born Barnes- 
ville, Ohio. Tune 16. 1912; unmarried; debut on Vallee 
program, 1932. N. Y. 

KELLY, Joe William. Announcer. "National Barn 
Dance"; born Crawfordsville. Ind., May 31, 1901 ; mar- 
ried Marv James; one son; debut over WLK, Indian- 
apolis. CHIC. 

KEMP. Hal. Orchestra leader; born Charlotte. N. C. ; 
married Betsy Slaughter; one daughter. N. Y. 
KENNEDY. John B. News commentator. "Looking 
over the Week"; bom Quebec, Canada, Jan. 16, 1895; 
debut over WJZ, 1924. N. Y. 
KING, Helen. Actress, plays 
'n' Em"; born Los Angeles, 
Mitchell; debut over WGN. 
CHIC. 

KING, Jean Paul. Announcer and narrator, "Con- 
tented Program": horn North Bend. Ind.. Dec. 1. 1904; 
debut over KFOA. Seattle. Wash.. 1924. CHIC. 
KING'S MEN, THE. See Linn, Bud; Dodson, Jon; 
Darby, Ken, and Robinson, Rad. 

KIRILOFF, Alexander. Leader Russian orchestra, 
"Samovar Serenade"; born Leningrad. Russia. Feb. 
11. 1889; unmarried; debut over WEAF, Dec. 25, 
1927 N. Y. 

KITCHELL, Alma. Contralto; born Superior, Wis.; 
married; two sons; debut over NBC, 1929. N. Y 
KNIGHT, Raymond. Actor and writer, "Station 
KUKU"; born Salem. Mass., Feb. 12, 1899; married 
Ruth Adams; one son. one daughter; debut in New 
York City. January. 1928. N. Y. 



Children" ; 
Perry; one 



Recitals" ; 
New York 



"Em" in "Clara, Lu, 
Calif. ; married John 
Chicago. June, 1930 



KOESTNER, Josef. Orchestra leader; born Willes- 
dorf, Bavaria, Oct. 15, 1901; married Lucile Corbet; 
one sen; debut in Chicago, 1929. CHIC. 
KOGEN, Harry. Orchestra leader, "Sinclair Min- 
strels"; born Chicago, Dec. 18, 1895; married Naomi 
Kadison; two sons; debut over NBC, 1928. CHIC. 
LA CENTRA, Peg. Contralto and actress; born 
Boston, Mass., April 10; unmarried; debut over 
WNAC, Boston, 1929. N. Y. 

LAMBERT, Scrappy. Tenor, Show Boat Quartet; 
born New Brunswick, N. J., May 12, 1901; married 
Edna Johnson. N. Y. 

LANDE, Jules. Orchestra leader; born Berry ville, 
Va., June 6. 1896; unmarried; debut in New York City, 
1929. N. Y. 

LANDT Trio. Singers; Jack, born Nov. 4, 1911; Karl, 
Aug. 11, 1908; Dan, Oct. 25, 1901; all born in Scran- 
ton. Pa. Jack and Karl are unmarried; Dan is mar- 
ried. Debut over NBC, October, 1928. N. Y. 
LANE, Rita. Soprano, "Carefree Carnival"; born 
San Francisco, July 17, 1910; unmarried; debut in San 
Francisco, 1930. SAN F. 

LANG, Arthur. Baritone; born Lehighton, Pa., Dec. 
22, 1905; unmarried; debut over NBC, 1923. N. Y. 
LA PRADE, Malcolm. Travel commentator, "Cook's 
Travelogues"; born Memphis, Tenn., Dec. 20, 1889; 
married Virginia Vance; one child; debut in New 
York City, 1923. N. Y. 

LARSEN, Larry. Organist, "Words and Music"; 
born Chicago, Aug. 26 1895; married Vali Eben; one 
son; debut over WLIB, Chicago, 1924. CHIC. 
LA VEY, Gloria. Soprano, "Down Lovers' Lane" ; 
born Beckingham, Kent, England, March 6, 1909; un- 
married; debut over CKY, Winnipeg. N. Y. 
LAWNHURST, Vee. Pianist, partner of Muriel Pol- 
lock; born New York City; married; one son; debut 
over WEAF, 1923. N. Y. 

LAWRENCE, Bob. Singer, "Paul Whiteman's Music 
Hall": born New Orleans, La., Nov. 4, 1907; mar- 
ried Edith Defay; one daughter; debut over WEAF. 
New York City, 1932. 

LAWRENCE, Earl. Pianist; born Pittsburgh, Pa., 
March 22, 1908; married Lucille Knee; debut over 
KDKA, Pittsburgh, 1922. CHIC. 

LAYMAN, Zora. Singer; born near Hutchinson. 
Kansas, March 12; debut in California when 14 years 
old. N. Y. 

LEE, Bob. Baritone, "Al Pearce and His Gang"; 
born Arizona, July 1, 1910; unmarried; debut with 
Pearce, 1933. N. Y. 

LEE, Virginia. Actress, "Virginia Lee and Sun- 
beam"; born Adrian, Mo., Sept. 14, 1903; married; 
one daughter; debut over WABC, New York City, 
1929. CHIC. 

LEIBERT, Richard. Organist; born Bethlehem, Pa., 
April 29, 1906; married; one daughter; debut over 
WRC. Washington, D. C. N. Y. 

LELAND, Charlie. Master-of-ceremonies, "Hits and 
Bits"; born Detroit, Mich., 1898; married Grace Davis; 
debut over KHJ, Los Angeles, 1930. N. Y. 
LESTER, Rita. Contralto; born Glenn's Ferry, 
Idaho. Feb. 26. 1910. CHIC. 

LILLIE, Beatrice. Comedienne; born Toronto. Can- 
ada, May 29; widow (Lady Peel) ; one son; debut New 
York City, Tan. 4, 1935. N. Y. 

LINN, Bud. Tenor, King's Men Quartet. "Paul 
Whiteman's Music Hall"; born Indianapolis, Ind., 
April 30. 1909; married Dorothy Woodbury; debut 
over KHJ, Los Angeles, 1925. N. Y. 
LITTAU, Joseph. Orchestra leader; born Elizabeth, 
N. J., Dec. 20; married Beatrice Belkin; one son; 
debut from Roxy Theater, 1929. N. Y. 
LIVINGSTONE, Mary. Comedienne with Jack Benny; 
born Los Angeles, Calif.; married Jack Benny; debut 
New York City, 1932. N. Y. 

LOUGHRANE, Basil. Actor, "Sally of the Talkies"; 
born Toronto, Canada, Jan. 1. 1901; married Helen 
Codd; one son; debut over WHK, Cleveland, Novem- 
ber, 1929. CHIC. 

LOVEL, Leigh. Actor, plays "Dr. Watson" in 
"Sherlock Holmes" sketches; 'x>rn Kent, England, 
Dec. 10; married Octavia Kenmore, actress; debut in 
New York City. 1931. N. Y. 

LUTHER, Frank. Tenor, leader Men About Town 
trio; born Hutchinson, Kan., Aug. 4; married Zora 
Layman; debut in New York City, 1926. N. Y. 
LYMAN, Abe. Orchestra leader; born Chicago, Aug. 
14, 1897; unmarried. N. Y. 

LYON, Ruth. Soprano, "Temple of Song"; born 
BIoomin?ton, 111., Jan. 18, 1906; unmarried: debut 
over WMAQ, Chicago, 1929. CHIC. 
LYTELL, Wilfred. Actor, "Billy and Betty"; born 

" York City, Oct. 16, 1893; debut over NBC, 1930. 

N. Y. 

...i.*y DONALD, Claudine. Announcer, "Women's 
Radio Review"; born Chicago; married; debut over 
NBC, 1931. N. Y. 

MAC DOWELL, Ed. Singer, member Three Scamps 
Trio; born Jersey City, N. J., April 23, 1905; unmar- 
ried; debut, 1928. N. Y. 

MALONe, Pick. Comedian, plays "Molasses" in 
"Show Boat"; "Pic" in "Pic and Pat"; born Dallas, 
Tex., June 23. 1893; married; two sons; debut with 
Show Boat. N. Y. 

MANNERS, Lucille. Soprano; born Newark, N. J.; 
unmarried; debut in Newark, 1932. N. Y. 
MANSFIELD, Ronnie. Singer and comedian, "Ron- 
nie and Van"; born Reading, Mass., 1910; married 
Harriet Bowker; debut over NBC, 1931. CHIC. 
MARCELLI, Ulderico. Orchestra leader, "House by 
the Side of the Road"; born Rome, Italy, Oct. 3, 
1885: unmarried; debut over WIBO, Chicago, 1928. 
CHIC. 

MARIANI, Hugo. Orchestra leader. "Continental 
Varieties" ; born Montivideo, Iluuguay, South America, 
June 1. 1899; unmarried; debut over WEAF, 1927. 
N. Y. 

MARIO, Don. Tenor, "Penthouse Serenade" ; born 
Tuinucu, Cuba, May 27, 1907- unmarried; debut over 
NBC, September, 1934. CHIC. 

MARLEY, Madge. Contralto, "Hits and Bits"; born 
Silver City, N. C, March 4, 1908; married nermann 
Curtis : debut over WABC. N. Y. 
MARSHALL, Charles. Comedian, "Carefree Carni- 
val"; born Concordia, Kan., Feb. 9. 1898; married; 
debut in San Francisco. 1928. SAN F. 
MARVIN, Johnny. Tenor; born Missouri, July 11, 
1897: married: debut over NBC. 1928. N. Y. 
MAXWELL, Richard. Tenor, "Tone Pictures"; born 
Mansfield, Ohio, Sept. 12, 1900; formerly married; 
one son, two daughters; debut over WJZ. 1923. N. Y. 
MAYO, Waldo. Conductor and violinist, "Capitol 
Family" orchestra: born New York City. Oct. 5, 1897; 
married Frances Janell; debut New York City, 1925. 
N. Y. 

McCALLION, Jimmy. Actor, "Billy and Betty"; 
born New York City, Sept. 27, 1919; debut over NBC, 
January. 1928. N. Y. 

McCLOUD, Mac. Comedian, "Sinclair Minstrels"; 
born Grand Rapids, Mich.. Aug. 20, 1900; married; 
one son; debut over WIBO, Chicago, June 15, 1929. 
CHIC. 

McCORMACK, John. Tenor; born Athlone, Ireland, 
June 14, 1884; married Lilv Folev : one son. one daugh- 
ter; debut over NBC, 1929. N. Y. 



58 



RADIO MIRROR 



Radio's Miracle Man 

{Continued from page 32) 

to give them a fair profit. The oil men 
thought about it for a day or two and 
then told him to go fry an egg, or words 
to that effect. 

And he fried an egg, one that the oil 
companies have been trying to digest ever 
since. He did it over WNAX which by 
that time had grown into a 2,500-watt sta- 
tion. 

When he got the message he passed 
it on to his listeners. He told them he 
was going to give them a fair priced gas 
if it took every cent he had. 

That night Gurney's son, Charles, drove 
to Omaha and bought and shipped a load 
of gas station equipment — pumps, storage 
tanks, etc. — to Yankton. From Omaha he 
flew down to Oklahoma and started three 
tank cars of gasoline rolling north. 

The following day, "D. B." went on the 
air again and said that on Saturday, 
WNAX would be selling gas at seventeen 
cents a gallon. 

Friday the equipment and the oil ar- 
rived. Gurney, his son and laborers set 
up the equipment, pumping the fuel into 
the storage tanks by means of a garden 
hose. 

On Saturday morning at 11 o'clock 
the first customer arrived and was served. 
He was the first of a long line of motor- 
ists who kept driving up throughout the 
weekend. In two days, Gurney sold 5,000 
gallons of gasoline. 

THAT'S how Gurney entered the oil 
business. Today he has five hundred 
gas stations, scattered over South Dakota, 
North Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa and Ne- 
braska. Each station is marked with the 
name of WNAX. 

And that adds to the miracle, for this 
is the only radio station in the country 
which has gasoline stations as a sideline. 

He's an easy-going man who lives in 
a nine-room house. His four children are 
all married. All have children. But their 
grandfather's mind races along even when 
he is sitting in a chair, seemingly at peace, 
with his evening paper. 

Right now, he is using radio to drive 
home a message that will bring prosperity 
to the farmers. He thinks that the farmer 
should grow things that factories can use 
and not be satisfied only to grow food- 
stuffs. 

For example, he wants corn to be made 
into alcohol. He has done more than 
talk, he has started the ball rolling. 

At his gas stations today he is selling 
gasoline with a small percentage of alco- 
hol added. This mixture gives more miles 
per gallon and it helps the corn growers. 
It also is a step toward the future when 
there will be no more oil wells, when gaso- 
line will be rare and costly. Then we'll 
have to add alcohol. 

He's way ahead of his time, this man of 
sixty-five. He has performed miracles in 
his life. He can remember when he had 
only twenty-five cents to his name, when 
he was buying coal in little baskets to 
keep the plants in his greenhouses from 
dying. That's why, perhaps, he under- 
stands people so well, why he is so human, 
so friendly. 

When he drives up the street of Yank- 
ton, his right hand keeps waving: 

"Hello, Ed . . . Hello, Bill . . . Hello, 
Sarah." 

And the people on the sidewalk, feeling 
a little better because of the greeting, 
reply : 

"Hi, 'D. B.'" 






"You wouldn't hold out on 
my dolly, would you Mum- 
my? C'mon, hand over that 
smoothy stuff while 
I give this child of 
mine a treat!" 




"Pm Johnson's Baby Powder — the kind that 
soothes away skin irritation just like that! For 
I'm soft as silk — made of the very finest Italian 
Talc. No gritty particles nor orris-root in me. 
And don't forget my team-mates — Johnson's 
Baby Soap and Baby Cream!" 






59 



RADIO MIRROR 




WHO CARES FOR WEALTH OR HIGH POSITION 
I LOVE YOUR CAREFREE DISPOSITION! . 



ROMANCE PAST! 




HEARTBURNS MADE YOU JUST A LOUSE- 
NOT FIT TO HAVE AROUND THE HOUSE! 




DON'T TAKE YOUR WOES TO RENO, DEAR- 
GIVE HIM TUMS— AND STAY RIGHT HERE I 



HAPPY END! 




YOU'RE PERFECT NOW— WE WILL NOT SEVER- 
I LOVE YOU, DARLING— MORE THAN EVER I 



JUST TRY TUMS AFTER MEALS! 



"TF you get acid indigestion from favorite 
A foods . . . but distrust those old-fashioned 
water-soluble alkalizers as I did... munch a 
few TUMS after meals! They're absolutely 
safe, and relieve gas, h eartburn or sour stomach 
— — "I in a jiffy!" You never 

£7jjr£?£? know when . . . that's 

C *-*-<-Beautifui why thousands carry 



'Beautiful 
5 color 1935-36 Cal- 
endar - Thermometer 
with the purchase of a 
10c roll of Turns or 
25c box of nr (the all- 
vegetable laxative). 
At your druggist's. 



the handy vest-pocket roll of TUMS with 
them always. TUMS contain a special antacid 
compound that cannot dissolve except in the 
presence of acid. When acid condition is cor- 
rected, any excess antacid passes on inert. 
TUMS contain no soda or any harsh alkali 
that may over-alkalize the blood of stom- 
ach. Only 10c for TUMS. At all drug stores. 



TUMS 



FOR THE 

TUMMY 



A. H. LEWIS COMPANY. St. Louis, Mo. 




CLASS PINS— any letters, any year, any colors. Silver plated, 
> II, 40* ea; gold plated, 50* ea; sterling, 60* ea. Silver plated, 
re, 35* ea; gold plated. 45* ea; sterling, 55* ea. Sterling silvei 
. rings as shown, 1 to 11. 91.90 ea; 12 or more, 11.65 ea. Write for Big FREE | 
Catalog showing hundreds of pins, rings, medals, emblems, trophic 



META1 ARTS C0..k.. FACT0RYK2I ROCrlESTER.NY 



FADED HAIR 

Women, girls, meu with gray, faded, streaked hair. Shampoo 
and color your hair at the sa me t? me with hew French 
discovery "SHAMPO-KOLOR," takes few minutes, leaves 
hair soft, glossy , natural. Permits permanent wave and curl. 
Free Bookie!, Monsieur L. f. Valligny. Uepl. 18, 254 W. 31 Si. New York 



THOUSANDS LEARN MUSIC 
WORLD'S EASIEST WAY 



No Expensive Teachers...No Bothersome 
Scales...No Boring Exercises 



BEGINNERS PLAY REAL 
MUSIC FROM THE START 



Yes, literally thousands of men and women in 
all walks of life have learned music — have won 
new friends, become socially popular — this 
quick, modern, easy as A-B-C way. 

i You, too, can learn to play — to entertain 
others — to pep up any party — just as these 
thousands of others are doing. And you can do this 
without the expense of a private teacher — right in your 
own home. You don't need to be talented. You don't 
need previous musical training. Yriu don't have to 
spend hours and hours playing monotonous scales and 
humdrum finger exercises. You start right in plaving 
real little tunes. And sooner than you expected you 
find yourself entertaining your friends — having the 
best times you ever had. 

Easy as A-B-C 

The U. S. School method 
is literally as easy as A-B-C. 
First, it tells you how to 
do a thing. Then it 
shows you in pictures how 
to do it. Then you do it 
yourself and hear it. What 
could be simpler? And 
learning this way is like 
playing a game. Practic- 
ing becomes real fun in- 




LEARN TO PLAY 

BY NOTE 

Piano Violin 

Guitar Saxophone 

Organ Ukulele 

Tenor Banjo 

Hawaiian Guitar 

Piano Accordion 

Or Any Other 

Instrument 



stead of a bore as it used to be with the old way. 

Prove to yourself without cost how easily and quickly 
you can learn to play. Send today for Free Demon- 
stration Lesson and Explanatory Booklet. See the simple 
principles around which this method is built. If you really 
want to learn music — if you want to win new popularity — 
enjoy good times galore — mall the coupon below Don't 
delay — act NOW. Instruments supplied when needed, 
cash or credit. U. S. School of Music, 30611 Brunswick 
Bldg., N. Y. C. 



U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

30611 Brunswick Bldg., New York City 

Send me your amazing free book, "How You Can 
Master Music in Your Own Home," with inspiring 
message by Dr. Frank Crane; also Free Demonstration 
Lesson. This does not put me under any obligation- 



Name 

Address 

Have you 
Instrument . . . .Instrument? . 



Facing the Music 

(Continued from page 37) 

"I'm King Again," and "There's a Shadow 
In the Sunshine of Your Smile," are two 
of them. The others must remain name- 
less for a bit. 

We might as well tell you now, that 
Guy just won't play a tune of Carmen's 
unless it's good. No favoritism. Car- 
men doesn't want it. Matter of fact, 
Carmen had one song submitted to Guy 
under another name, and the boys played 
it for three weeks before they knew it 
was his composition. 

The members of the original group, 
Guy, Carmen and Fritz Kreitzer, are 
celebrating their twentieth year of play- 
ing together this fall. 

(The above is especially for Helen 
Mayes Hemphill of Los Angeles, and her 
Carmen Lombardo loyalists. A bigger 
story in Radio Mirror about the Lom- 
bardos soon, we hope.) 

* * * 

IT'S A FUNNY THING 

It's hard to say — what it is about the 
ocarina oddities of the Foursome on CBS 
Wednesday night with Johnnie the page, 
that evokes those involuntary chuckles 
from listeners. We can only tell you what 
produces those amusing sounds and leave 
you in the bliss of ignorance and listen- 
ing. 

Aside from the ocarinas, which they all 
can play, Marshall Smith sings tenor; 
Del Porter is second tenor, clarinetist, 
saxophonist, tin-flutist and hill-billy 
violinist; Ray Porter is baritone, arranger 
and sweet violinist, and Dwight Snyder, 
bass and pianist. 



SHORT SHORT SHORT STORIES 

After this, you keep track of those 
D'Orsey Brothers . . . Right after we'd 
reported last month that the two had 
split with finality, they made up again 
. . . Jessica Dragonette is to make two 
more pictures for M-G-M . . . Away, 
says NBC, with foul rumors that Harry 
Horlick's Gypsies will alter their style 
this fall after nearly a dozen years . . . 
Away with the rumors that they will go 
off the air because Kate Smith starts a 
new series for the same sponsors on CBS 
October first ... All right, away with 
them . . . From San Francisco studios 
of NBC comes word that Pat O'Shea, 
ballad singer, is engaged to Miss Pauline 
Starr, Hollywood dancer . . . Born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Leibert, a baby 
girl . . . When Glen Gray comes back on 
the air October first with Walter O'Keefe, 
he will present his new girl vocalist, 
Deane Janis. 



ORCHESTRAL ANATOMY 

(For Bill Hoover again.) Joe Rines' 
orchestra: Three saxophones, two trum- 
pets, guitar, bass viol, piano and drums. 
As this is written, he is on the NBC blue 
networks Tuesday nights at 11:30 from 
the Mayfair in Boston, Mass. 

(For Irene Stefanell, Reynoldsville, Pa.) 
Rudy Vallee's orchestra: Two pianos, 
four violins, four saxophones, two trum- 
pets, two trombones, guitar, bass viol, 
tuba and drums. He was first on the_ air 
with his original group from the Heigh- 
Ho Club in New York City in February, 
1928. Guy Lombardo's orchestra: Four 
saxophones, trumpet, trombone, piano, 
guitar, bass horn and drums. He was first 
on the air from Cleveland ten years ago, 
and first on a Columbia network seven 
years ago. 



60 



RADIO MIRROR 



THEME SONG SECTION 

Pronounce that title quickly. If you 
didn't lisp, you may read on 

(For Janet Southwick, Hasbrouck 
Heights, N. j.) The theme of "Conti- 
nental Varieties" is "Papagayo," by Hugo 
Mariani. It is in manuscript form and 
unavailable at present either as sheet 
music or as a recording. , 

.(For A. Morrison, Seattle, Washington.) 
We find no record of the theme song, 
"Love's Ship" on any network program 
on the air now or recently. If it does 
turn up, we'll let you know. 

(For Mrs. C. P. McGuire, Birmingham, 
Ala.) Jesse Crawford's theme song is 
"Forgotten Melody" by Jesse himself. It 
is in manuscript form, and so far as we 
know, not available either as a recording 
or as sheet music. Since Jack Benny 
will have Johnny Green's orchestra in- 
stead of Don Bestor's, there may be a 
new theme for that program. We'll wait 
and let you know. 

»* * * 
(For Rose Venturi, Boonton, N. J., 
Viola Gaither, Cleveland, N. C. B. M. 
Dunne. Easton, Pa., and any others who 
are curious about the business ot pub- 
lishing songs.) . 

The music publishing business is a hard 
headed one. Profit, naturally, is its chief 
aim. They cannot afford to spend much 
time with songs of unknown outsiders. 
In the business, they know pretty well 
what their future needs will be. Outsid- 
ers can't possibly know. Sometimes the 
publishers are wrong. Sometimes an out- 
sider will present a new type of song 
and it will be a hit. It is very rare. 

How, then, does the outsider start? 
Well, most of our popular music is writ- 
ten by men and women who've lived 
through hope and disappointment and 
heartbreak and hours of toil as they 
went through the mill that is New York's 
Tin Pan Alley, learning what and what 
not to do. 

"It's a mad, wild, business, which has 
made fortunes for many a man. broken 
many another. To the beginner it should 
be said quite frankly that it's a tough 
game. 

We do not know at present, of any 
agent whom we can recommend. And the 
motion picture companies contract for 
their music only with established musi- 
cians, songwriters, or music publishers. 
So that's out. 

BUT, if you can wait until next month, 
we will endeavor to have for you, the 
advice of a half-dozen prominent song- 
writers and publishers on the best course 
to pursue. 

We strongly advise you to wait until 
then. 



(For E. McKegg, Honolulu. Hawaii 
and Raphael Paladini. Garfield, N. J.) 
Ray Noble was born in Brighton, En- 
gland, 27 years ago. His father is a 
famed British surgeon. Ray, after grad- 
uation from Cambridge University, be- 
came affiliated with the British Victor 
company of which he is now musical 
director. It was his best-selling record- 
ings which brought him to this country. 

Al Bowlly, who came to New York with 
Noble, was born in Johannesburg, South 
Africa, where he worked as a barber. He 
studied the singing of the Kaffirs and 
Zulus in the diamond mines and applied 
some of the intricacies of their vocal 
styles to modern music. He toured 
Japan, China, India, Dutch East Indies, 
Java and Sumatra with an orchestra, and 
eventually came to London where he be- 
came recording vocalist for Noble. He's 
fond of boxing and wrestling, and while 



This Germ 'Free care 
brings Quicker Beauty 




New scientific principle keeps 

Woodbury's Creams 

germ-free to the last! 

Clear, dewy loveliness . . . the 
freshness of youth . . . can be 
yours, with these new beauty 
creams that are pure, exquisite, 
germ-free! 

Woodbury's Creams encourage 
the skin to bloom with finer tex- 
ture, clearer tone, because they 
guard against the blemishes which 
menace delicate complexions. 

These lovely, fragrant creams 
possess a unique germ-destroying 
power— to prevent those tiny infec- 
tions caused by germs. And they 
stay lastingly germ-free — to the 
bottom of the jar. 

With this protection your skin 
quickly becomes clearer, softer, 
more resilient. Color, too, im- 
proves. And you may use Wood- 
bury's Creams constantly, with 
only the best results. They are safe 
for even the most sensitive skin. 

Woodbury's Cold Cream con- 
tains Element 576, which prevents 
and overcomes dryness — restores 
youthful vitality of the skin, which 
alone keeps faces young and free 
from withering. 

Woodbury's Facial Cream gives 
a light protecting film to which 
you apply your make-up with flat- 
tering effect. Woodbury's Germ- 
free Creams are only 50c, 25c and 
10c in jars; 25c and 10c in tubes. 



fc 1935, John H. Woodbury, Inc. 

• AVOID IMITATIONS. Look for the head and signature, Jh^- *+ nWtfu^.p,*., on all Woodbury products. 

61 



RADIO MIRROR 




Home Treatment for 
Keeping Skin Young 

Mercolized Wax — one beauty aid you can afford 
because this single preparation embodies all the 
essentials of beauty that your skin needs. It 
cleanses, softens, bleaches, lubricates and pro- 
tects. So simple to use, too. Just pat it on your 
skin each- night as if it were an ordinary cold 
cream. Mercolized Wax seeps into your pores, 
dissolves grime, dust and all impurities. It 
absorbs the discolored surface skin in tiny, invis- 
ible particles, revealing the beautiful, smooth, young skin that lies ' 
beneath. It clears away freckles, tan, oiliness, sunburn or any other 
blemishes. You use such a tiny bit of Mercolized Wax for each appli- 
cation that it proves an inexpensive beauty investment. Beauty can not 
be taken for granted. It must be cared for regularly if you want 
to hold beauty through the years. Mercolized 
Wax brings out the hidden beauty of your 
skin. Let it make your skin more beautiful. 

Phelactine removes hairy growths — takes them out — 
easily, quickly and gently. Leaves the skin hair free. 
Phelactine is the modern, odorless facial depilatory that 
fastidious women prefer. 

Powdered Saxolite dissolved in one-half pint witch 
hazel quickly reduces wrinkles and other age signs. It is 
a refreshing, stimulating astringent lotion. Use it daily. 




NtMxoliztMl 
. Wax 

i,? e "utifies The SK.nj 



Want Some Money? 

Here's a wonderful way to get it 

Our beautifully illustrated book tells 

how. It tells all about our new methods of art 
decoration, art treatment and how any- 
body can learn without previous training 
or experience. Itcontainspageafter 
page of handsomecolor illustrations 
of what you can make and sell. You 
can make good money and this 
book pjTp "p"R Oursystemisamaz- 
is IT XVllIvingly easy to learn 
and the profits are larger than in al- 
most any other business. You can pro- 
duce beautiful finished art objects 
almost from the beginning. You don't 
have to know how to draw or have any 
experience. Begin making money now. All sup' 
plies are sent by us with the instructions anc 
many have made $25 the first week. Some 
society women have taken up this work for 
their own amusement. — Either way, pleasure or profit, 
it's the most delightful home work you can imagine. 
Write Now for your copy of this valuable book; it's FREE. 

FIRESIDE INDUSTRIES, Dept. 34-S, Adrian, Mich, 





WORK ..."FUN 

■ft ■■ SB 1 Constipation 

ft lift IH Cleared Up 

THE end of every day found her ^B 
tired out, nervous, often with head- 4R 
aches. But now, thanks to Nature's 
Remedy, work is fun again — she feels "?"^H 
like going to a movie or dance any - 
night. Millions have switched to this 
natural all-vegetable laxative. Con- 
tains no mineral or phenol 
derivatives. Instead a bal- 
anced combination of laxa- 
tive elements, provided by 
nature, that work natu- 
rally, pleasantly. Try an 
NR tonight. When you 
see how much better you 
feel you'll know why a 
vegetable correc- ^ ^ » 
tive is best. Only 
25c at all druggists. 

THE A. H. LEWIS MEDICINE CO., St. Louis, Mo. 

W"W\rr BmnHful r, Color— 1S8B-1936 Calcndar-Thermo 
fa Hk fa ■ v ""' ihi! pun-ham, nf« 20c Ijox of NR,c 
I HLLl Turns il- - 



62 




£t>op.. 

WORRY OVER 

GRAY 
HAIR 




Now, without any risk, you can tint those streaks or 
patches of gray or faded hair to lustrous shades of 
blonde, brown or black. A small brush and Erowna- 
tone does it. Prove it — by applying a little of this 
famous tint to a lock of your own hair. 

Used and approved — for over twenty-four years 
by thousands of women. Brownatone is safe. Guar- 
anteed harmless for tinting gray hair. Active coloring 
agent is purely vegetable. Cannot affect waving of 
hair. Is economical and lasting — will not wash out. 
Simply retouch as the new gray appears. Imparts 
rich, beautiful color with amazing speed. Just brush 
or comb it in. Shades: "Blonde to Medium Brown" 
and "Dark Brown to Black" cover every need. 

BROWNATONE is only 50c— at all drug and 
toilet counters — always on a money-back guarantee. 



in Johannesburg, was runner-up for the 
African welter-weight boxing champion- 
ship. 

(E. E. Smith, Camden, N. J.) We have 
been unable to determine what has be- 
come of Redferne Hollinshead. If any- 
one knows, we would appreciate learning. 

(Jane Osborne, Utica, N. Y.) Lanny 
Ross' brother has never appeared on the 
screen. 

(Allen Grabast, Laredo, Mo., and B'ill 
Storz, Weimar, Ca'l.) Paul Tremaine 
and his Band from Lonely Acres is now 
on tour. Columbia informs us he will 
very probably be on the air this fall. 
Quite possibly he will be available to 
Western listeners. He was born in Kan- 
sas City and is about thirty. More details 
when he returns. 

(V. Milne, Glen Rock, N. J.) We 
understand that Buddy Harrod's orches- 
tra has been disbanded. 

(Janet Southwick again.) Kenny Sar- 
gent as a baritone, can range from the 
A below high C down to middle C. 

(Gertrude Wachtel, Brooklyn, N. Y.) 
Julian Woodworth was on the Columbia 
network during part of August from the 
Pavilion Royale, Valley Stream, L. I. 
He will probably be on the air this fall, 
but as yet, his schedule is not definite. 

(Kenn Doan, Toronto and William V. 
Graeger, Bethlehem, Pa.) It is virtually 
impossible to tell what orchestras send 
out photographs of themselves. They 
change their minds very quickly. 1 suggest 
that you write them in care of the station 
on which you hear them. 

* * * 

FOLLOWING THE LEADERS 

Sorry that we can't play the game this 
month of telling you where your favorite 
orchestra leaders are making personal ap- 
pearances so that you can see them and 
perhaps dance to their music. There were 
just so many questions to answer that 
there just wasn't space. But let's do this. 
Ask us the locations of those orchestras in 
which you're most interested. We'll try 
to let you know where they're to be play- 
ing. Use the coupon below. 

* * * 

YOU'RE TELLING US 

. . . And probably muttering because 
this department didn't answer your ques- 
tion. Well, drop around sometime and 
take a look at our reeling brain. We have 
to sit here and snatch out answers from 
the old cerebrum as it whirls. In the 
meanwhile, if there's anything else you'd 
like to know about music in radio, fill 
in this coupon and mail it to: 

John Skinner, 
Radio Mirror, 
1926 Broadway, 
New York City. 

I want to know more about: 

Orchestral Anatomy 

Theme Song Section 

Following the Leaders 

Or 

Name 

Address ■ 



Amateurs at Life 

(Continued from page 14) 

Leaning over a chair, laughing, was 
Lanny Ross. Mickey admitted her sur- 
prise. 

"He's not as tall as you are, Tad. Why 
he's no different from the boys we know 
in Poughkeepsie!" 

"No," Tad yawned, "neither am I — ex- 
cept that Lanny and I have talent." 

Mickey's elbow found its way between 
two of Tad's ribs. 

"Where do we go now, stupid?" she 
asked. 

"Up high, where I can show you the 
landmarks of New York. This way, ma- 
dam. We must take an elevator to the 
ground floor and then into an express 
back up." 

In the central lobby, impressive with 
darkly shining marble and towering atten- 
dants, Tad found a row of elevators des- 
tined for the sixty-fifth floor. "Your 
chariot awaits without," he said, preced- 
ing her into the lift. 

Mickey had to swallow from the twen- 
tieth floor on, her ears hurt so, but she 
felt better when she saw Tad doing the 
same thing. The lift slid to a smooth stop. 
She followed Tad out. A swarthy man in 
a white mess jacket was waiting, bowing 
and smiling. 

THE grill? Right this way," he said, 
prancing off to the left. Tad began 
to walk after him until Mickey pulled on 
his sleeve. 

"Are — are we in the right place?" she 
asked. 

"Shhh!" Tad quieted her and bolted 
away. He was back in a minute, his face 
crestfallen and sheepish. "Uh — I think the 
view is better down a little ways. Too 
far up here." 

Mickey, suspicious, demanded more. 
"And tell me the truth this time," she 
said. 

"Well," said Tad reluctantly, "if you in- 
sist, we're on the same floor with the 
Rainbow Room and the robbers want to 
charge us for the view." 

"The — the Rainbow Room? Isn't that 
a famous night club?" 

"Just about the most famous," Tad 
said, regaining the poise he had nearly 
lost a minute ago. "We'll come here after 
Sunday night." 

"All right," Mickey agreed, "but I want 
more of a view than I'm getting now 
waiting for the elevator." 

On the way down, Tad decided that 
they were tired of sight seeing. "Let's go 
back to our rooms," he pleaded. Mickey 
felt he had been chagrined enough for one 
day and consented. 

Visitors to New York have a way of 
ferreting out the best living quarters for 
the least money — or visitors like Mickey 
and Tad seem to — while those rareties, 
born New Yorkers, continue to stifle in 
box-like apartments that are expensive 
because they were built during the boom 
and have doormen in long coats. 

Tucked away, square between stately 
Fifth Avenue and roaring Madison, not 
too far below Radio City's Fiftieth street, 
Mickey and Tad had found an old house, 
an even older landlady, and rooms that 
let you stand up straight and stretch, 
even Tad. 

When they reached Mickey's room on 
the third floor, Tad said: "Let's go on up 
to my room and practice a song." But 
Mickey excused herself. 

"That audition tired me out. I think 
I'll sleep now and be fresh for the morning." 

Tad went on, yawning. "See you in the 
morning," he called down the stairs. 

For the next three days, they didn't see 



RADIO MIRROR 



JIM LOVED THE SPAGHETTI WE 
HAD AT YOUR HOUSE. HOW DO YOU 
MAKE THAT MARVELOUS SAUCE? 

MARY, YOU CAN BUY THAT 
SPAGHETTI RIGHT HERE IN THI! 
STORE ! IT COMES ALL 
^.READY-PREPARED 






Beais m Y home-cooked 
spaghetti a mile- 

quicker, easier -costs less, too!" 

't don't wonder Mary was surprised. 
JL I certainly was the first time I 



tasted Franco-American. Up until 
then I firmly believed no ready-pre- 
pared spaghetti could possibly be as 
good as home-cooked. But Franco- 
American is actually better — ever so 
much better! I use it all the time 
now and I've told a number of my 
friends how delicious it is. 

"We all agree it has the best sauce 
we ever tasted. In fact, we never 
knew how good spaghetti could 
be till we tried Franco-American!" 

Good? No wonder! 

Franco-American chefs use 
eleven different ingredients 
when they prepare their 
delectable sauce. Tomato 
puree, lusciously smooth 
and rich. Golden Cheddar 




cheese of just the right sharpness. 
Selected spices and seasonings, each 
one adding its tiny bit more of zest- 
ful flavor and delicate piquancy. 

"Why should I bother with home- 
cooked spaghetti now?" women are 
saying. "I never could make as good 
a sauce as this. And I'm not even 
going to try." Franco-American is so 
much easier, too. No cooking or 
fussing — simply heat and serve. 

And here's a pleasant surprise. 
You pay less for it than if you bought 
all the different sauce ingredients 
plus the cost of cooking 
them. And isn't the time 
you save worth something, 
too? Ask your grocer for 
Franco-American today. A 
can holding three to four 
portions is never more 
than ten cents. 






63 



RADIO MI RROR 




Any Woman 
can be 

Up to Date 

(in her information) 

A great deal of the talk among women, on 
the subject of feminine hygiene, had better 
be disregarded. Some of it is garbled, in- 
correct, perhaps even dangerous. And some 
of it is just plain old-fashioned. Here are 
the facts, for any woman to read, and bring 
herself up to date. 

With Zonite available in every drug store, 
it is old-fashioned to think that poisonous 
antiseptics are needed for feminine hygiene. 
There was a time in the past, when certain 
caustic and poisonous compounds actually 
were the only antiseptics strong enough for 
the purpose. But that day ended with the 
World War which brought about the dis- 
covery of Zonite. ' 

Zonite is the great modern antiseptic- 
germicide— far more powerful than any 
dilution of carbolic acid that can be safely 
used on human flesh. But Zonite is not 
caustic, not poisonous. This marvelous 
Zonite is gentle in use and as harmless as 
pure water. Zonite never injured any 
woman. No delicate membranes were ever 
damaged by Zonite, or areas of scar-tissue 
formed. 

It is hard to believe that such power and 
such gentleness could ever be combined— 
as they are in Zonite. But what an ideal 
combination this is— for the particular re- 
quirements of feminine hygiene. 

J Also Zonite Suppositories (semi-solid) 
Zonite comes in liquid form— 30c, 60c and 
$1.00 bottles. The semi-solid Suppository 
form sells at $1.00 a dozen, each pure white 
Suppository sealed separately in glass vial. 
Many women use both. Ask for both 
Zonite Suppositories and Liquid Zonite by 
name, at drug or department stores. There 
is no substitute. 

Send for the booklet "Facts for Women." 
This is a frank and wholesome booklet- 
scientific and impersonal. It has been pre- 
pared for the special purpose of bringing 
women up to date. Don't miss reading it. 
Just mail the coupon. 

USE COUPON FOR FREE BOOKLET 

ZONITe"pRODUCTS CORPORATION HM-511 

Chrysler Buildinz. New York, N. Y. 

Please send me free copy of the booklet or booklets checked below. 

) Facts for Women 

) Use of Antiseptics in the Home 

NAME 

(Please print name) 

ADDRESS 

CITY STATE 

(In Canada: Sainte Therese, F. Q.) 



much of these rooms, but it gave them 
both a sense of security to know that 
eventually each night they'd find their 
way back to the quiet of those graying 
walls. 

It wasn't until Sunday, in church, that 
Mickey drew a really long breath. And 
after lunch, on their way to Radio City 
that afternoon at three, she and Tad felt 
like crawling into a nice dark cave and 
sleeping for months. 

"I'd like to hear of a place in this town 
we haven't seen," Mickey challenged. 

"There's Grant's Tomb," Tad replied, 
but Mickey wouldn't let that count. 

"Grant has been dead too long." 

After that, they didn't have any more 
time to think about how tired they were. 
This was the day — destined somehow, 
Mickey knew, to be the longest remem- 
bered of her life — that Byron and Crail 
would make their professional debut to a 
listening America. At exactly nine to- 
night, Uncle Jim's Amateur Hour went on 
the air, with an estimated audience of 
over ten million children and adults. 

But first there was an exacting rehear- 
sal to be gotten through and that was 
why Mickey and Tad had come to Radio 
City at three. Some of the other ama- 
teurs had come early and were tuning 
their instruments or striking chords on 
the stage piano. 

"Should we practice a little?" Mickey 
suggested. 

Tad shook his head. "We could do our 
number in our sleep. Let's just sit and 
see what happens." 

THEY found the same seats they had 
occupied on Thursday. Mickey kicked 
Tad on the ankle. "Look over there to the 
left of the stage. Am I seeing things?" 

Tad laughed. "That's a one-man band, 
you dope. He. plays the harmonica with 
his teeth, the violin with his hands, beats 
the drums with his feet, and the cymbals 
with his knees." 

"Oh look, there's the cowboy." Mickey 
waved to him. The lanky stranger sat 
down next to her. 

"Howdy," he said, "I'm Jeff Bowers, 
from Montana. Rode the rails clear to 
New York just to get on this here show. 
Knew I could do it." 

A dusky, raven haired woman gaudily 
dressed in the waist and skirt of a gypsy 
joined the little group. "I'm Tannera," 
she announced simply. "I sing the songs 
of my fathers." 

Tad introduced himself and the other 
two. "Miss Crail and I have an act to- 
gether," he explained. 

"Do they pay you for this?" the gypsy 
wanted to know. 

Jeff shook his head. "But if you win 
first prize, you get a week at the Century 
theater, New York's biggest vaudeville 
house. And at three hundred per week, 
too." 

"Three hundred?" Mickey's head 
whirled. That was more than she could 
make this fall teaching school for two 
months. 

Tad grew interested. "And to think I 
studied to be an engineer," he moaned. 
"Why didn't I get wise to myself sooner?" 

"You haven't won yet," Mickey re- 
minded him. "There are seven other acts 
tonight." 

"That's right," the cowboy added, "but 
if you whistle like you did the other day, 
you've got a good chance." 

Uncle Jim came into the studio then, 
before Tad could think of anything more 
to say. He went directly to the stage. 
The amateurs moved down closer to him. 

"Here's what I want you to do," he said 
kindly. "I've arranged the order in which 
you appear on the show. As I call your 
names, I want you to come up here and 



Volt.&u£HjWLlils 
my 1935 OFFER 

^WEAR A WATCH 
OR DIAMOND 



Htm Make Your Own Terms 



My confidence in YOU ; my 
confidence in my standard, de- 
pendable watches and beautiful 
genuine diamonds, and my con- 
fidence in business conditions 
cause me to make this unheard 
of offer. I am going to place 
as many watches and diamonds 
in the hands of men and women 
Ihrouehout the land an possible in 
1935 NO MATTER WHAT THE 
SACRIFICE, because each watch and 
diiiiiioiul will act us a salesman to sell 
another. 

Direct -to -You, Rock Bottom 
Prices on Nationally Advertised 
Watches, Diamond Rings 
and Silverware 

What an offer! Nationally 
advertised watches, diamonds 
and silverware offered at low- 
est direct-to-you prices. For 
nearly a half century we 
have sold highest quality 
jewelry all over the world. 
And now this remarkable offer. 

Send for Beautiful 
FREE CATALOG 

Write now — before this offer is with- 
drawn and get the beautiful FREE 
Catalog. Select the watch or diamond 
you want, wear it, examine it, and 
then write us the terms you desire. 

SANTA FE WATCH CO. 

B-97 Thomas Bldg., Topeka, Kan. 
We Buy Old Gold 





^P4RlNGSGIVENC^ 

STONE For seeing only 6 large boxes M //l^ 

Mentho Nova Salve. Used for 35 s i'fi!2i£IEP 

.^3^^H^\ - vr ' nrB f " r coughs, colds, cuts, burns, 

i£^^^^^^^5l\ eores, catarrh, etc., at 25 cents each and 

Iff }m) returning $1.50. Choice of a hundred 

>N ^^J other Premiums. Send no money now. 

-^ We trust you. A Post Card will do. 

WEDDING Address, MENTHO NOVA CO. 

BAND Dept. 65, Greenville, Pa. 



DIAMOND 





Learn Public 
Speaking 

At borne — In spare time — 20 minutes a day. 
Overcome "stage-fright," gain self-confi- 
dence, increase your salary, through ability 
to sway others by effective speech. 
Write now for free booklet, How to 
Work Wonders With Words. 
North American Institute, Dept. 1388 
3601 Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Hi. 




AGENTSl Gold Mine! 

REVOLUTIONARY chemical 

sponge cleans cars like magic! Ban- 
ishes auto-washing drudgery. Als_ 
cleans linoleam, woodwork, windows with- 
out work I Auto owners, housewives wild obont 
It. Agents making phenomenal profits! ...._. 
SAMPLE OFFER— Samples sent at our risk to first person lu each lo- 
cality who writes. No obligation. Get details. Be first-send your nam* 
TODAY! KRISTEE MFG. CO.. 441 Bar.Street, Akron, Ohio, 



SALARY 
TO START 

$90to 
$175 

MONTHLY 



MEN.. 
WOMEN 

A?e Ran^e 



( ) Ry. Mail Clerk ( ) POSTMASTEH 

( ) P. O. Laborer ( ) Seamstress 

( ) R. F. D. Carrier ( ) Auditor 

( ) Special Agent ( ) Stenographer 

( ) Customs Inspector ( ) U.S.BorderPatrol 

{ ) City Mail Carrier ( ) Telephone Opr. 

( ) P. O. Clerk ( ) Watchman 

( ) Matron ( ) Meat Inspector 

( ) SpeciallnvestigatorC )Secret Service Opr, 

( ) Typist C ) File Clerk 

INSTRUCTION BUREAU, Dept. 315-A, St. Louis, Mo. 

Send me FREE particulars "How to Qualify for 

Government Positions" marked "X". SglarieB. 

locations, opportunities, etc. ALL SENT FREE. 



Name. . . 
Address. 



64 



RADIO MIRROR 






go througn your number. I'll ask you a 
few questions first that I will ask again 
on the broadcast. You just answer them 
as naturally as you can." 

Jeff Bovvers had drawn the first lot. In 
his slow, easy drawl he gave Uncle Jim 
a brief sketch of his life, then played his 
piece on the Jew's harp. 

It went on like that until all the ama- 
teurs had rehearsed their act and Uncle 
Jim had learned what he wanted to know 
about them — their jobs, their ambitions, 
their schooling. Mickey and Tad found 
that they were the third on the list. 

"Which is better for us," Tad told her. 
"It gives you a chance to get over your 
nervousness." 

"Don't worry about me," Mickey re- 
torted. "If you can keep your knees from 
buckling when you stand at the micro- 
phone, we'll be all right. Remember, I'm 
sitting down at the piano." 

After the last amateur note had died 
away, Uncle Jim signaled to Mickey. She 
followed him off a ways from the others. 

"Feel all right?" he asked her. Mickey 
nodded her head. "Why shouldn't I? This 
isn't a matter of life and death." 

Uncle Jim smiled wryly. "I wish more 
amateurs could remember that. You'll 
forget it too, the minute we're on the air." 
He turned to address the rest. 

"I'm going to send you all out for din- 
ner now. We have a little more than two 
hours until broadcast time. The only 
thing I want you to do for me is eat as 
much as you can." 

TO Mickey's questioning look, he whis- 
pered, "Most of these amateurs 
haven't had a square meal in years. Watch 
them tonight. They'll come back so 
stuffed they can hardly waddle. 1 want 
you and your Tad to go with them. Good 
experience for you." 

Mickey squeezed his hand in silent 
thanks and returned to Tad. In a few 
minutes two of Uncle Jim's secretaries 
herded the amateurs together and led 
them out, down the hall, down to the 
main lobby, and across the street to a 
famous radio restaurant. A long table in 
a back room was set with glistening silver 
and chinaware. 

"I'm kinda hungry, myself," Tad said, 
after he and Mickey had been seated at 
the end of the table, next to a girl who 
couldn't have been more than nineteen. 

Tad introduced himself. "And this is 
Mickey Crail, in New York with me on 
trial. What's your name?" 

The young girl smiled faintly. "Joan 
Blair." She hesitated, then went on, "I'm 
from Illinois. This is my first trip to 
New York and I'm scared to death." 

Mickey could see the tears welling up 
in the corners of Joan's eyes. She felt 
sorry for her, a kid alone in the country's 
biggest city. Tad must have felt sympa- 
thetic, too. 

"Forget it," he said. "We're scared too, 
but we don't let it get us down." 

Joan smiled gratefully. "I'm beginning 
to feel better already, just talking to you 
two." 

"Sure." Tad said. "Stop and think. 
Where will you be a year from now? No 
matter, but wherever you are, you'll look 
back on tonight and laugh at your fright 
as a good joke." 

Mickey, only half listening until now, 
felt her heart stop beating until she 
thought she couldn't breathe. Where 
would she be a year from tonight? Some- 
where with Tad? With a suddenness that 
wrenched every nerve in her body, she 
realized the truth. Without Tad, life 
would lose all the richness, all the bright 
happiness that was hers. 

What a little fool she had been, always 
to have taken it as a matter of course that 



Let GLAZO be your secret 
of lovelier hands 




GLAZO's world-renowned quality is 
unchanged, even at its new low 
20 cent price for nearly twice as much 
polish! It brings your nails lasting 
beauty and a satisfaction you never find 
in hastily-made, inferior brands. 

APPROVED COLORS, STARRIER SHEEN— GlaZO 

has a richer lustre ... in Natural, Shell, 




Flame,Geranium, Crimson andMandarin 
Red ... six perfect color tones approved 
by beauty and fashion authorities. 
2 TO 4 DAYS LONGER wear— Because of 
its superior quality, Glazo wears longer 
without streaking, cracking or peeling. 
special METAL-SHAFT BRUSH— Much easier 
to use than the old-fashioned quill brush. 
And the bristles can't come loose. 
OILY polish remover— Only 20 cents— 
and four times as much as before. Ben- 
efits nails and cuticle with special oil that 
does not dim polish, or cause peeling. 

GLAZO 

THE GLAZO COMPANY, Inc., Dept. GTllJ 

191 Hudson Street, New York, N. Y. 

(In Canada, address P. O. Box 2320, Montreal) 

I enclose 6c for sample kit containing Glazo 

Liquid Polish and oily Polish Remover. (Check 

the shade of polish preferred.) 

□ Natural □ Shell □ Flame □ Geranium 



65 



"Mete* 




4 MILLION WOMEN BOUGHT CLOPAY 

WINDOW SHADES 

LAST YEAR.. .andHere's Why... 

T^OTAL Clopay sales compared with average pur- 
-•- chase per person show the astounding fact that 
Clopay 15c window shades now hang in 1 out of every 
4 American homes! American housewives have seen 
CLOPAYS, tried CLOPAYS, and then bought them 
again and again. But, no wonder! The beauty of 
their lovely patterns and rich texture is not to be 
equaled in even the costliest shades — beauty ac- 
claimed by leading interior decorators the country 
over. Add to that the 
amazing durability of 
Clopays — their utter free- 
dom from cracking, pin- 
holing, raveling on the 
edges and other common 
faults of shades costing far 
more — then, their sensa- 
tional popularity is easy 
to understand. And now 
the new fall patterns are 
out — lovelier than ever 
before. Don't fail to see 
them. Write for samples 
showing patterns in full 
color. Enclose 3c for post- 
age. Clopay Corp., 1498 
York St., Cincinnati, O. 





NO FILLER TO FALL OUT 

This shows how clay or 
sizing falls out of ordinary- 
window shades from regular 
use causing cracks, pinholes 
and raveled edges. Impossi- 
ble with CLOPAYS which 
have no filler to fall out — no 
threads to ravel. 



NEW CLOPAY PATTERNS 

FOR FALL ARE 
STRIKINGLY BEAUTIFUL 
AND THEIR VALUE A 
REVELATION * 



*Says Mrs. Sarah Lockwoodr™r?ca°s 

Leading Interior Decorators, author of widely read book. 
Decoration — Past, Present and Future." 



During October leading 



'5 & 10" stores and 
many others will feature 
in their windows those 
striking new CLOPAY 
patterns so heartily en- 
dorsed by Mrs. Lock- 
wood. Watch for these 
displays — see how to 
beautify your home at 
negligible cost. 



-.>•• ' 


'-* 


J." 


jJLi 


•JT 


% 


•»K."%2- m £ 






'1 
J*- 




'> 




*£.« 



CLOPAW 



GUARANTEED ^ 
jfajfJytHisedin 

GOOD HOUSEKEEPING 
MAGAZINE a 



I5t WINDOW 5HADE5 

At AH 5 & 10 and Most Neighborhood Stores 

NOTE: Like all successful products. CLOPAYS are imi- 
tated. Bewarel CLOPAYS have PATENTED advantages 
no other inexpensive shade can possess. Insist on genuine 
CLOPAYS. 



66 



RADIO M IRROR 

Tad and she would be together. Home in 
Poughkeepsie it was different. But here, 
in New York, with its thousand places to 
live, its thousands of things to do, it 
would be so easy to lose Tad. Tad, whose 
second nature it was to win first place, 
who had tasted only success. And then, 
too, they weren't in love. 

Mickey couldn't go on past that word. 
Love? But she must- love Tad to suffer 
this terrible fear of having him escape 
her! The whole significance of their trip 
to. New York weighed down on her. Tad 
might be beginning a career that would 
leave an impassable gulf between them. 
And what possible right did she have to 
stay at his side? 

"Hey! Mickey, what's the matter?" 
Tad's sharp question brought Mickey 
back to earth. 

Fighting, she held back the hot tears. 
"Nothing. Guess I'm worn out, that's all." 

Tad put his arm around her shoulder. 
"Poor kid, sightseeing has been too much 
for you." 

Mickey knew she must be as pale as a 
ghost at a seance. She no longer had 
any stomach and perspiration made her 
hands cold and damp. With an effort, she 
began to eat the soup that a waiter 
brought her. The liquid restored some of 
her strength. Before dinner was over, she 
had recovered enough to hide her fears. 
Even, at last, she began to feel excitement 
creeping back into her veins. 

The walk to the studio completed the 
task dinner had begun. Mickey knew she 
had complete control of herself again, 
though the throbbing in her heart was 
still there. 

"All set?" Tad whispered. They were 
standing on the stage of the studio. In 



PRIZE WINNERS 
RADIO MIRROR 

Radio Favorites 
Contest 

First Prize— $100.00 

Mrs. Gladys Jones, Lorain, Ohio 

Second Prize — $50.00 

John E. Thayer, Cambridge, Mass. 

Two $10.00 Prizes 

Mayme Pelletier, St. Louis, Mo.; Mrs. D. B. 
Taylor, Hickory, N. C. 

Six $5.00 Prizes 

Magdalen T. Chernushek, Stafford Springs, 
Conn.; Florence Hoffman, Nutley, N. J.; 
Mrs. George H. LaVelle, Portland, Ore.; 
Louis Mauriocourt, Los Angeles, Calif. ; 
Hollys McMillan, Oakland, Calif.; Mrs. F. 
P. Moeckel, San Francisco, Calif. 

Twenty-five $2.00 Prizes 

Mrs. B. Banz, San Francisco, Calif.; Mrs. 
Jennie M. Barnes, Jamaica, N. Y.; Ruth 
Blodgett, Morgantown, W. Va.; R. V. 
Brown, Rockford, 111.; Carl Canterbury, 
Moline, 111.; L. E. Clark, Omaha, Nebr.; 
Carl A. Donner, Ann Arbor, Mich.; Helen 
Driggs, Superior, Nebr.; Mrs. Holmes El- 
liott, Pottstown, Pa.; Edith Estabrooks, 
Dubuque, Iowa; Agnes F. Gray, Kansas 
City, Mo.; Mrs. J. W. Johnson, Youngstown, 
Ohio; E. Charles Kulze, South Ozone Park, 
N. Y.; Jeannette Lachance, Quebec, P. Q.; 
Albert Manski, Boston, Mass.; E. F. Mar- 
tin, Buras, La.; Nancy McCrocklin, Louis- 
ville, Ky.; Floyd Miller, Harmarville, Pa.; 
L. W. Pattillo, Jacksonville, Fla.; Rae 
Rahilly, Austin, Minn.; R. Savauge, Sea- 
forth, Ont.; Etta Smith, Seattle, Wash.; 
Talitha Smith, McDonough, Ga.; Marian 
Wehner, Indianapolis, Ind.; Sophia L. Wit- 
kin, Springfield, Mass. 




LWdxic£n° N 

fib" W theBONKORA 

iPT^ METHOD 




SAFE AND EASY 

j A clinically -tested treatment 
where obesity is due to toxic 
conditions, faulty elimination, 
over-eating and drinking — and 
this comprises over 90% of obe- 
sity cases . . . No thyroid, dini- 
trophenol or other harmful 
drugs. No starvation diet. You 
can eat your fill of delicious 
foods as directed in the Bon Kora 
package. No strenuous exercise. The 
principle is detoxication or driving 
poisons out of the system so that bod- 
ily organs can function properly and 
excess fat be thrown off in a natural 
way. Actual case records show weight 
reductions up to 50 pounds in a com- 
paratively short time with renewed 
healthand vigor gained during process. 
Over a million bottles have been sold. 

Write for interesting free booklet entitled 
"Authentic Case Records on Detoxication Treatment." 

NO You take no risk with Bon Kora. Try a bottle. 

RISK If not satisfied with results we will refund your money. 

FOR SALE AT ALL DRUG AND DEPARTMENT STORES 



FREE 



BATTLE CREEK DRUG, INC., Dept M-ll 
Battle Creek, Mich. 

Send your Iree Case Record Booklet to 



address - 

CITT 



-WAHTED-i 

Women to make hooked rugs for our 

stores. No experience necessary. Steady 

work. We do the selling. Write at once. 

HOLLYWOOD STUDIO STORES 

5657 Hollywood Blvd., Dept. 7 

Hollywood, California 




Finished in 18 KL «fl Mm 

WHITE GOLD 15^ 

To introduce our ■ %J 
Beautiful Blue White Rainbow 
Flash Stones, we will send a 
1 Kt. IMPORTED Simulated 
DIAMOND, mounted in Lovely 
18 Kt. White-Gold Finish Ring 
as illustrated, for this ad. and 
15c expense in coin. Address: 
National Jewelry Co., Dept. 2, 
Wheeling, W. Va. (2 for 25c.) 



PHOTO ^''I^ISS 




Clear enlargement, bast, fall OArXV 
length or part group, pets or 

other subjects made from any pho- 
to, snapshot or tintype atlowprice 
of 49c each; 3 for $1.00. Send as 
many photos as you desire. Re- _ 
turn of original photos guaranteed. 

SEND NO MONEY 

Just mail photo with name and ad- 
dress. In a few days postman will 7 / n y £100 
deliver beautiful enlargement that ** * *« " 
will never fade. Pay only 49c pIqb postage or send 

6Uc— 3 for $1.00, and we will pay postage ourselves. 

fA^ V ^ ,F F ^^FREE!|?-^^ 1XXX4 i„Ce S 

quality of our work we will frame, until further notice, all pastel col- 
ored enlargements FREE. Illustrations of beautifully carved frames 
for your choice will be sent with your enlargement. Don't delay. Act 
now. Mailyour Photos today. Write NEW ERA PORTRAIT COMPANY 
11 E. HURON STREET. DEPT. 677 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



(SILK +HD5E 

'l GUARANTEED TO 
nUearWiHiout Holes 

or New Hose FREE / 



AGENTS: u * p o $24. n a WEEK 

New kind of Silk Hose, Chiffons and Service 
Weights — have "tight-twist" threads — ends snags. 
2 pairs guaranteed to wear 3 mos., 4 pairs 6 mos. 
Agents: Big money full or part time demonstrat- 
ing, in addition get your own hose free. Grace 
Wilbur, Iowa, reports $37.10 profit in 9 h ours. 
Wessberg earned over 8100 one week ^*1^. 
Demonstrating equipment supplied, ^ 
Write, giving hose size. A 

WILKNIT HOSIERY CO. 
M8 Midway, Greenfield, O. 





68 

STYLES. 
COLORS 



RADIO MIRROR 



back of them the program's large orches- 
tra was tuning its instruments. Horns 
shone softly in pastel colors from the 
lights concealed in panelling above. Out 
in front of Mickey a sea of faces opened 
and shut mouths in audible whispers. The 
studio was jammed. Pages ran up and 
down the aisles, seating late arrivals 
whose hats were still on. 

To a roar of deafening applause, Uncle 
Jim walked on, bowed, and look his seat. 
lie turned and winked at Mickey. 

"Just like the opening night of our high 
school play," Tad laughed. "Only I'm not 
half as scared I couldn't be." 

The announcer on the program raised 
his hand for silence. 

"I want to welcome all of you here in 
behalf of King James gasoline. The 
amateurs you see on the stage have come 
from every corner of the country. If I 
had more time, I would introduce them 
to you. But in thirty seconds, Uncle 
Jim's Amateur Hour will be on the air!" 

I le stopped. There was a fragmentary 
silence, broken abruptly by the opening 
theme song of the program. 

Uncle Jim stood up and spoke into the 
microphone. "Ladies and gentlemen of 
the radio audience, tonight I have an- 
other interesting group of amateurs. If 
you live in New York, or Chicago. 1 want 
you to phone in your votes for the ama- 
teur act you like the best. If you don't, 
wire and mail your votes to me, care of 
Radio City. And now I see on my list 
the name of Jeff Bowers." 

Tad leaned toward Mickey, and with 
his hand over his mouth, said in barely 
audible tones, "Let's show 'em, kid! This 
is our big chance. We've got to make 
good !" 

And Mickey, waiting for the dragging 
minutes until she and Tad would be on 
the air, tried to want to win. Yet, in 
spite of herself, she hoped they could go 
back to Poughkeepsie. Then Tad might 
be safe. 

She became conscious of Tad's nudging. 
"Wake up, sap, we're next!" 

Is Mickey justified in her fears that she 
may lose Tad, now that they're in New 
York and are broadcasting on the coun- 
try's biggest amateur hour? Read whether 
she tries to win a first prize on the pro- 
gram, and what happens to two kids when 
they come to radio row for the first time 
seeking adventure. Don't miss the next 
instalment in the December issue of 
Radio Mirror, on sale October 25. 



How Hollywood Puts the 
Stars on the Spot 

(Continued from page 23) 

choke him. Whereupon his director, a 
wise man, realizing such nervousness must 
not be alowed to take a firm hold, called 
a halt. 

"Listen, Jimmy," he said, "you just look 
at the mike. See. You're not scared of 
any mike. You're used to mikes. And, 
boy, do you know how to handle them!" 

Then he called over his camera crew 
to give them quick orders. And when 
Jimmy began to sing again the camera on 
its silent, rubber-tired dolly was rolled 
up behind him, then brought around to 
catch him from the side. But Jimmy, ab- 
sorbed now in his singing, was oblivious 
to its existence. 

Gladys Swarthout insists the heat wave 
Hollywood groaned under this summer 
was the thing which saved her from 
herself and all of her mounting fears. She 
told me all about it as we sat one sultry 
afternoon in the library of the big house 






Look what else comes 
in the Dentyne package 

MOUTH HEALTH — As a bonus, you receive with 
Dentyne the wherewithal to a healthy mouth — to 
white, sparkling teeth. For chewing Dentyne is the 
finest kind of mouth health promotion. Its firm 
consistency exercises the mouth muscles and helps 
the mouth to clean itself — naturally, normally. 
It helps prevent flabby mouth and chin muscles, 
too. Many dentists, orthodontists, and physicians 
recommend its frequent use. 

WITH THIS DELIGHTFUL GUM — Of course 
you receive a delicious gum, too. Really different 
with a delicious, distinctive flavor, and a general 
air of quality that makes it the favorite of thou- 
sands. Notice the characteristic, handy, flat shape 
which distinguishes the Dentyne package. It fits 
easily in vest pocket or purse. Try some today. 



DENTYNE 

KEEPS TEETH WHITE- MOUTH HEALTHY 



67 



RADIO MIRROR 



N&teb alt f t/te money 

i/eu need fiiYi 

Christmas 



RBffl 



i 



. ; A 



Any Photo, Snapshot 
or Picture, Clearly 
and Faithfully Reproduced 
on Beautiful Lifetime Ring 

BIG, QUICK, EASY 

HOLIDAY PROFITS 

For Men and Women Agents 

Never before such a whirlwind money-maker! Amazing 
new PORTRAIT RING brings you handfuls of dollar 
bills just wearing and showing to friends, neighbors — 
everyone! The ideal lifetime Christmas Gift and a sen- 
sational holiday seller. Think of it! A beautiful, rich, 
onyx-like ring with actual portrait of any loved one 
clearly and faithfully reproduced from any photo, picture 
or snapshot! A tremendous hit! The portrait is made a 
permanent part of the ring itself — never fades — cannot 
nick or scratch — unbreakable — not affected by water and 
will not tarnish. Each ring individually made-to-measure 
and sent in beautiful gift box. Picture returned with 
ring unharmed. 

No Other Gift Like This! Everyone 

Wants To Give This Beautiful 
LIFETIME PORTRAIT RING 

What gift could be more welcome, new or novel than a 
beautiful, life-time ring set with an actual portrait of 
some one near and dear? Fathers, mothers, husbands, 
wives, sweethearts — everyone wants it — many folks 
order 4 to 12 rings from one picture as gifts for friends 
and family. Amazingly low price — only $2.00 — brings 
you orders by the dozen! And you make SI. 00 cash-in- 
advance profit (100%) on every order! Only 10 orders 
a day can pay you S60.00 in a week! 

No Experience Needed For Big Profits 
Just Wear Ring On Your Finger 

Christmas and Holiday season gives you a 
once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to cash in 
BIG! No experience needed — no long sales- 
talk — no demonstration — no sample case to 
carry — just wear ring on your finger — take 
orders and pocket your cash profits! We 
deliver and collect balance! 

SAMPLE RING FOR YOU! 
SEND NO MONEY! 

Learn How To Get Sample Ring Free of Charge 

Rush photo or snapshot of yourself or loved 
one and let us make up ring for YOU! SEND 
NO MONEY! Just pay postman S1.00 
(wholesale price) plus few centB postage when 
rinK in delivered. If not delighted, return ring 
in 5 days and we refund every penny you 
paid us. We also send complete money- 
making plans and details of amazing FREE 
SAMPLE OFFER. ACT NOW! Rush 
this coupon. 

PORTRAIT RING CO., Dept.C-31 

12th and Jackson Sis., 



3. 

Cincinnati, Ohio k • 



SEND YOUR RING SIZE yUm 



RING SIZE r 
I 



PORTRAIT RING CO., Dept. C-31 
12th & Jackson. Cincinnati. Ohio 

Enclosed in photo. RuBh in- 

dividunlly made portrait RinK. and FKLE equipment. 
I'll pay postman $1.00 plus few cents postage. (Photo 
will be returned with ring.) 

Nome 




she had taken, the house Grace Moore 
had previously occupied. 

She looked very beautiful in dusty pink 
pajamas with her dark hair hanging in 
smooth curtains at the sides of her lovely 
face, brown from the semi-tropical sun as 
befitted the Spanish singer whom she 
plays in Paramount's "Rose of the 
Rancho." 

"On the train coming out," she said, "I 
had a bad time. The excitement I'd first 
felt at the idea of making movies disap- 
peared and a sinking fear took its place. 
I realized suddenly what I was undertak- 
ing. 'I mustn't attempt this,' I told my 
husband. '1 must go back, Frank. Really 
1 must. There's too much to be lost. Too 
much at stake. To go on and try to be a 
movie star when actually I'm a tyro at 
acting before the cameras — why, it's ridic- 
ulous!' " 

But he reassured her. He is, you know, 
Frank Chapman, a famous concert singer. 
He is aware of the demands made upon 
an artist in any field and he had confi- 
dence in this lovely wife of his. He had 
seen her conquer the concert platform, 
reap brilliant triumphs at the Metropoli- 
tan Opera House, and become a radio 
star almost overnight. He knew with the 
sure instinct given us about those we love 
that Gladys Swarthout Chapman had the 
resources which make stars, which see 
people through to glory whatever they 
undertake. 

1 REMEMBER," Gladys told me, 
"waking up nights with a start, real- 
izing that every minute brought me closer 
to my ordeal before the cameras. Oh, it 
was frightening." 

As she talked of her fears I saw her not 
as the sure prima donna and the confident 
star but as a frightened young girl afraid 
of what lay ahead of her. 

I asked her how the heat wave had 
saved her. 

"The first work we did on 'Rose of the 
Rancho,' " she explained, "we did at 
night at the Paramount ranch. Lying in 
between the flanks of those mountains the 
valley was a furnace, it wasn't long be- 
fore the heat — pressing, pressing, pressing 
—blotted out everything else. Hardly 
knowing what I was doing I answered my 
call to work before the cameras. And of 
course once the jump was made, once I 
actually was working, it became easier." 

You probably remember the pictures 
Lanny Ross made last year. They weren't 
successful pictures; Lanny himself was 
unhappy about them. He hurried back to 
the radio studios to work hard and prove 
to his audiences that he was still entitled 
to stardom in this medium even if he had 
appeared at a temporary disadvantage. 

When Lanny reached Hollywood the 
movie producers, delighted to have his 
drawing-power behind their pictures, 
spread out the red carpet for him. 

"Don't worry about acting," they told 
him in flattering tones. "Just act natural. 
You'll be all right." 

Lannv, who knew nothing about screen 
technique, was at their mercy. How could 
he guess that to seem natural on the 
screen takes the most skilled and subtle 
acting of all? 

How much the unhappy results irked 
and worried Lanny is proved by his ac- 
tivities last summer when he spent time 
and money and worked like a dog in 
stock companies to learn about acting and 
serve his apprenticeship. Soon again he'll 
return to the studios and, mark this, he 
won't be on the spot a second time. He'll 
know what to do and how to do it. He'll 
prove his right to the screen stardom 
which was dropped in his lap before he 
was able to hold on to it. 

Rudy Vallee also suffered through his 




""Anti-Colic" 

NIPPLES 



A million mothers 
every Y ear success- 
fully feed iheir babies 
with Davol "Anti- 
Colic brand nipples. 

Scientifically designed. 

Two popular styles: 
(1) Ball-lop (2) Sani-Tab 

At your nearest drug store, 

buy the nipples with the blue 

band. (Sold in Canada only 

without the blue band.) 

DAVOL RUBBER COMPANY 

Providence • Rhode Island 



FREE £0^ "FEEDING YOUR BABY" 
Write name and address clearly. Mail coupon to 
Depl.F-1, Davol Rubber Co., Providence, R. I. 





mama 




TO DISPLAY FALL DRESS STYLES 

Single or married women. No experience needed. 
Big pay full or part time — up to $23.75 in a week. Even 
housewives get cash first day— latest atylea in wool 
and crepe at special bargain prices. Your own dresses 
furnished without cost. Write quick for free facts. 
Send no money — iuBt name on penny card. 

I. V. SEDLER CO., INC. 
Dept. 20-11 Cincinnati, Ohio 



BACKACHES 

due to MOTHERHOOD 

Having a baby puts a terrible strain on 
a woman's back muscles . . . frequently 
causes years of suffering. Allcock's Por- — 
ous Plaster does wonders for such backaches. 
iJraws the blood to the painful spot . . . shoulder, 
back, hips, arms, legs. Pain stops quickly. Allcock's 
is the original porous plaster . . . take nothing else. 
.Lasts long, comes off easy. Also excellent for chest 
colds. 25# at druggists or write ■ mi ■»■.... _ 
"Allcock, Ossining, N. Y." >:1H>m»i;tfrM 

QUICK 

SEE FOR YOURSELF? 

IRONINGS 

NO STICKING-NO SCORCHING 

Here's that new way to do hot <2 ♦ / 

starching without mixing, boil- " 
ing or straining as with old ^% F F E R 
fashioned lump starch. Every- 
thing already included in pow- 
dered form. Makes starching 
easy. Makes ironing easy. See 
how elasticity and that fresh new 
look are given back to curtains, 
aprons, play clothes, soft collars 
andshirts. Your iron fairly glides. 
A wonderful invention. Send now. 

THANK YOU 

J THE HUBINGER CO., No. 969, Keokuk, la. | 

Send me your trial offer check good for 6c on the pur- ■ 
chase of a large lOcpackacre of Quick Elastic Starch, and I 
your free folder, ' 'That Wonderful Way to Hot Starch." | 



I V-----W 



HOT STARCH 
IN 30 SECONDS 



1 



Nam*.. 



■ AddreaB - ^ | — .^- -^_- ■ - .. J 



68 



RADIO MIRROR 



first picture experience. Hollywood also 
put Rudy on the spot. But Rudy, too, in 
the end proved to be the stuff of which 
real stars are made. In the first rounds of 
his movie career he took failure on the 
chin but he came back in later rounds to 
make a knock-out. 

Bing Crosby was so tortured at the 
thought of facing the cameras and by his 
fear of how he was going to look that it 
became a phobia with him. To this day, 
in spite of his increasing success, he has 
a mortal fear of the camera and he has 
to be forced into the projection room to 
look at his rushes. 

Fred Allen is another radio star who 
has been in the studios. He worked with 
Paul Whiteman, Ramona, Phil Baker and 
Rubinoff in Fox's "Thanks a Million." 
Fred doesn't kid himself about being on 
the spot. Not for a minute. He figures 
you have a better chance of coming 
through if you keep your eyes open and 
are honest with yourself. 

"Hollywood," he says, "offers a radio 
star the biggest gamble he'll ever be ex- 
pected to take but, in turn, it gives him 
the largest salary he'll ever make. So 
most of us are taking the chance and 
praying for the best. 

LEAVING the air for the studios even 
< temporarily is a risky business. The 
chances are definitely against the ether 
star in this set-up because, unless he can 
justify his reputation in his very first 
picture, he's considered a failure. A movie 
player can survive two or three mistakes 
in pictures. But the film executives and 
the public don't forgive a radio star who 
falls from grace, even though through no 
fault of his own. 

"Everybody," Fred went on, "knows the 
first appearances of Rudy Vallee, Amos 
and Andy, Ed Wynn and several others 
hurt them. They're excellent entertainers. 
The trouble was due to the fact that they 
were rushed into a medium about which 
they knew nothing, forced to do things 
new to them and out of keeping with 
their own sense of showmanship. 

"Well, I've tried to profit by these mis- 
takes. And so when you see me it won't 
be as a screen lover but as the sour- 
voiced, sarcastic wisecracker which is my 
trademark on the air. If I stick to that 
character and leave the love-making to 
those who know something about it — and 
my appearance to the cameramen who 
know their job — I should retire from 
Hollywood with a couple of pockets full 
of cash, a lot of good friends, and several 
invitations to come back and make more 
pictures." 

Rubinoff, violinist and bandleader, is of 
the same mind. "I'll just stick to my 
violin and my band, something 1 know 
about, not try to act too much," he says. 

Lily Pons' first few hours on the set 
were nightmarish, quite as horrible as she 
had known they would be traveling West 
on the train. The revolving wheels seemed 
to say, "You're on the spot, Pons . . . 
Pons, you're on the spot ... on the spot 
... on the spot!" 

Her first scene called for her to stand 
in a second story window and sing the 
aria from Rigolctto. It was a tough first 
scene and, realizing this, her hands turned 
cold and clammy, her throat tightened 
with a nervous pulse. The camera on its 
big crane swung around and then zoomed 
up into position. 

"I thought to myself," she admits, 
"'Turn now. Run! Terrible as it will be 
to do this it will be better than staying. 
You can't do this. Go on! Run! Now, 
quickly, while there's still time!'" 

However something held her there. 
And the next thing she knew the director 
asked her to take her place in that win- 







The proof is shown 
below in a test that 
you can make yourself 




First take a level teaspoonful of 
a good packaged soap. Put it in 
your dishpan. Then add a pint of 
warm water. Swish it around 
with your fingers for about 15 
seconds. 



Then pour both the water and 
suds into a quart jar. Note the 
depth of the suds. Notice whether 
or not they are thick and rich. 
See whether or not they are 
quick to break down. 



Now make the same test with 
Silver Dust. See the deeper, full- 
bodied, rich suds ! That's why 
Silver Dust washes all dirt and 
grease off dishes — quicker and 
easier. Makes them sparkle ! 



NOW you know why thousands of 
women prefer this new, white, sudsy 
soap for dishwashing! Silver Dust does 
the work faster and better. No more 
half-clean dishes. No more dishpan 
drudgery. Silver Dust keeps your hands 
white and smooth. Gets you out of the 
kitchen quicker, for leisure or pleasure. 
Won't you try Silver Dust right now? 
Two boxes contain two full pounds of soap 
at a lower price than you pay for anything 
nearly as good. Order Silver Dust today. 




69 



RADIO MIRROR 




AN AFFLICTION 
THOUSANDS SUFFER 
BUT FEW 
TALK ABOUT! 



HEMORRHOIDS or Piles are one of the 
worsr afflictions. They not only harass and 
torture you, but they play havoc with your 
health. They tax your strength and energy, wear 
you down physically and mentally and make 
you look haggard and drawn. 

Piles, being a delicate subject, are often borne 
in silence, and allowed to go untreated. Yet, no 
condition is more desperately in need of atten- 
tion. For Piles can, and often do, develop into 
something serious ! 

REAL TREATMENT 
Real treatment for the relief of distress due to 
Piles is to be had today in Pazo Ointment. 
Pazo almost instantly stops the pain and itch- 
ing and restores grateful comfort. It is effective 
because it is threefold in effect. 

First, Pazo is soothing, which tends to relieve 
sore and inflamed parts. Second, it is lubricat- 
ing, which tends to soften hard parts and also 
to make passage easy. Third, it is astringent, 
which tends to reduce swollen parts and to 
stop bleeding. 

Pazo is put up in Collapsible Tubes with spe- 
cial Pile Pipe, which is perforated. The perforat- 
ed Pile Pipe makes it easy for you to apply the 
Ointment high up in the rectum where it can 
reach and thoroughly cover the affected parts. 
Thousands of persons have used this method 
of applying Pazo and found it highly effective. 
TRY IT! 

However, for those who prefer supposito- 
ries, Pazo is now put up in that form, too. Pazo 
suppositories are simply Pazo Ointment in 
suppository form. They have all the well-known 
Pazo efficacy and, in addition, are superior as 
suppositories, being self- lubricating. Pazo 
Suppositories are packed 14 to the box and 
are not only more effective, but more eco- 
nomical than the ordinary. All drug stores sell 
Pazo -in -Tubes and Pazo Suppositories. Get 
either today and see the relief it holds for you! 



70 



dow, the lights went on and the camera 
crew stood ready. Now she was in for it. 
Now, even as she had thought the train 
wheels warned, she was on the spot. 

She began to play the scene. She sang 
the first notes of her aria. Familiar notes, 
familiar as her own hands. On, on she 
went. She was caught up in the music as 
Jimmy Melton had been. She came to 
the high notes, passed them. She reached 
the very end. . . . 

"And," she says, "it was over. The 
camera had been on me. That dreaded 
first close-up had been taken. And, un- 
believable as it all sounds, I hadn't known 
about it. I'd become so absorbed in my 
singing that I hadn't even seen the cam- 
era." She's in RKO's "Love Song." 

When Everett Marshall arrived in 
Hollywood to play with Dolores Del Rio 
in "I Live For Love" (Warner-First Na- 
tional), test after test was made of him. 
These tests weren't good, no one was 
satisfied with them but what was wrong 
no one could decide. It wasn't that he 
didn't photograph well — a change of 
make-up could have remedied that — it 
washis voice that didn't come through. 

Finally the director had an idea — a 
screwy idea but he tried it. 

"When you sing, Marshall, for the 
broadcasts," he asked, "do you have an 
audience watching you in the studios?" 

MARSHALL, still trying to figure out 
what was wrong, nodded. The direc- 
tor disappeared. When he came back he 
had a lot of other people with him. 

"Don't bring extras on yet," Marshall 
pleaded. "Don't let's start until we find 
out what's wrong and correct it." 

"These aren't extras," his director told 
him. "They're your audience. Now sing!" 

Marshall sang. His voice rolled out. 
And the playback of that- new test de- 
lighted everybody who heard it. Singing 
to people, you see, Everett Marshall gives 
himself and forgets himself. 

"But why," I can hear you saying, "do 
the radio stars go to Hollywood and make 
pictures if it's such an ordeal, if it puts 
them on the spot and jeopardizes every- 
thing they already have? Why are they 
so ambitious? So greedy?" 

Jack Benny, now making M-G-M's 
"Broadway Melody of 1936," answered 
this question. This, you know, is Jack's 
second summer in the movie studios. He 
wouldn't let himself be starred at first. 
He insisted upon time to feel his way. 

"We really have to make pictures," he 
said. "Because the money they offer is 
our salvation. Show business isn't what 
it used to be. Either you're on top today 
or you're practically nothing. There's 
little middle ground. And you have only 
a short road up very often and always a 
very, very short road down. Once upon a 
time when you passed your peak you 
could count on a few years in vaudeville 
on the strength of your name. Vaudeville 
today amounts to practically nothing. 

"So while we're having our fling we have 
to make enough to see us through the rest 
of our lives, through all the years when 
we won't be tops any longer. We need at 
least ten years of a high income, espec- 
ially now that different taxes take so 
much of all we earn away from us. And 
to insure ourselves these ten years we've 
got to do different kinds of things, not let 
the public get tired of us in any one me- 
dium. Radio. Personal appearances. A 
show now and then. And pictures. We 
can't afford to keep all our eggs in one 
basket. There's too much at stake!" 

Which explains why you find more and 
more radio stars in the studios, terrified, 
so nervous they can neither sleep nor eat. 
They have no choice. They have to let 
Hollywood put them on the spot. 



FLOWER BASKET 

. . .make carry -alls , dolls , 
lamp shades, 2 5 novelties 
A in all -10c 



Ahandfulof clothes-pins, 
and a few strips of colorful 
crepe paper— that's all you 
need tomakethis clever new 
kind of flower basket. It's 
oneof the75 tempting, use- 
ful, easy-to-make novelties 
shown in the 1935 Book of 
w Dennison Crafts. Also in- 
cluded are lamp shades, toys, 
dolls, bagsandbelts, trays, bas- 
kets, vases, carry-alls— all sorts 
of clever, up-to-date articles for 
home decoration, for friends, 
asgif ts, tosell. Send for the Book 
now— it'sonly 10c— and contains 
directions for all 
75 novelties. 



DENNISON'S, Dept. L-145 

Framingham, Mass. 

Please send the 1935 Book of New 
Dennison Crafts. 1 enclose 10c. 




Name 

Street (or R.F.D.) 

City State 

Why not let us include some of these other Dennison Books? 

Check those you want and enclose 10c for each. 

..New Showers and Announcements Book 

..Parly Games, Slants and Decorations 

..Crepe Paper Flowers ..Hallowe'en Party Book 

..New Crepe Paper Costume Book ..The Cellophane Craft Booh 



©e/vmi/cvovi/ (©/xe^ve 



\g&£ 



atHo^ 



Make money taking pictures. 'Photo- 
graphs in big~ demand. Commercial 
Photography also pays big money. 
Learn quickly at home in spare time. 
No previous experience needed. Write 
for new book. Opportunities in Mod- 
ern Photography. American School 
of Photography, Dept. 1388, 3601 
Michigan Ave.. Chicago. 



USED BY STARS * * 



Makes their hair ' 
alive with shimmering love- 



. Capture such i 



ciblc at* 




' tractiveness for yourself. Use CONLIN'S OIL SHAMPOO 

-the Stars' Secret — keeps your hair cleansed and ravishingly 

beautiful. Contains wonderful, scalp-nourishing elements. 

^Lcmon or vinegar rinse unnecessary. Send name* address. Pay 50c 

on delivery, for 6 oz. bottle. 

COHUH CHEMICAL CO., 1111 No. Hudson, HOLLYWOOD, CAL. 



KEEPS HAIR GLORIOUS 



Learn to Dance 

Son can learn all the modern dances— the latest 
Tango steps, the new Fox Trots, dreamy Waltzes, 
smart Collegiate Steps, and popular Society Stepr 
at home, easily and quickly. New chart method 
makes dancing as simple as A-B-C. No music 
or partner required. Don't be a wallflower. 
Learn to dance. Complete course-*256 -pages, 
64 illustrations, sent on G Days' Free Trial. 
Equals $20.00 course. Send do money. Pay 

Sostman only £1.98, plus postage upoD arrival. 
ioney back if not delighted. Catalog Free. 

franklin Pub. Co.. 800 No. Clark SL.DeoLC- 546, Chicago 



CPERFUMES 

i ■ I SEND ONLY 2.7 '< 



f 5 new, alluring, heavy, lasting perfumes . 
foreign essences. Sell regularly $2.50 to S10 the oz. 
Different from any perfumes you have ever known. 
Five exotic fragrances: 
1. JASMIN D* ESPAGNE (Spain). 2. SHAH 
(Persia). 3. GEISHA (Japan). 4. FLEUR DE 
VIGINE (France). 5. CACTUS BLOSSOM (Mex.) 
end only 27c in stamps (or silver) for the 
5 generous size trial bottles. 

H. U. RHODIUS, Importer 

710 Pari9ienne Building 
Sab Antonio, Texas 



Hair 




off as 



Chin 

I once looked like this. Ugly hair on 
Unloved ' ace ■ ■ ■ umoveo - • • • discouraged. 
Nothing helped. Depilatories, waxes, 
liquids . . . even razors failed. Then I discovered a 
simple, painless, inexpensive method. It worked! 
Thousands have won beauty and love with the secret. 
My FREE Book, "How to Overcome Superfluous 
Hair," explains the method and proves actual suc- 
cess. Mailed in plain envelope. Also trial offer. No 
obligation. Write Mile. Annette Lanzette, P. O. Box 
4040, Merchandise Mart, Dept. 184, Chicago. 



RADIO MIRROR 



Coast-to-Coast Highlights 



Ch 



icago 






{Continued from page 10) 

gratifying to James Pctrillo, head of the 
local musicians' union and "daddy" of the 
idea. 

* * * 

War in Ethiopia has a special signifi- 
cance for Vivian della Chiesa, Columbia 
audition winning soprano. Vivian's cur- 
rent heart interest forsook his duties as a 
sound engineer in a movie studio in Rome 
to become a cavalry lieutenant in the 
Italian army. 

Pat Flanagan, the WBBM sports an- 
nouncer, likes to tell of the fan who asked 
an usher at the ball park to introduce her 
to Pat. 

"Listen, lady," Pat reports the usher re- 
plied, "Pat's the swellest guy in the world. 
He'd give you the shirt off his back. But, 
lady, keep your illusions!" 

From "Thirty Years Ago Today" in the 
Lincoln, Neb., Evening Courier: 

"A pony driven by the Atlass children 
ran away yesterday but fortunately no 
one was injured." Nowadays Les Atlass 
is the Chicago boss of the Columbia net- 
work and of WBBM. The other "child" 
is Ralph Atlass, his brother, who operates 
radio stations WJJD and WIND. While 
Les and his chief engineer, Frank Falk- 
nor, were fishing from Les' yacht in 
northern lake waters he radiogrammed the 
studios: "Frank Falknor is the best fish- 
erman in Canada — twenty bass in two 
hours." But what he didn't know was 
that Holland Engle, his program director, 
made the story look sick that same day 
by catching thirty-four perch in his bare 
hands! Although it sounds sort of Paul 
Bunyanish, Holland's explanation is simple. 
He was standing on the docks when he 
saw a whole string of perch float by ap- 
parently having come loose and drifted 
away from the stand of some fisherman 
farther out on the dock. So Holland 
waited until the perch drifted by and 
grabbed the line. 



A letter addressed simply to "Eddie 
and Fannie Cavanaugh" reached them at 
the Columbia studios with no delay. 



Recently Chicago newspapers told how 
Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Collins, Jr., were lo- 
cated by a special news bulletin over 
WGN. They were motoring in northern 
Wisconsin when word was received in 
Chicago that their eight-year-old son was 
suddenly desperately ill with pneumonia. 
WGN officials knew that the mother 
tunes in their station a lot so they broad- 
cast the report and she telephoned in 
within an hour. The reason WGN figured 
she'd be listening to their programs is 
that Mrs. Collins is one of the three girls 
who, as the Bennet Sisters, sing harmony 
over that station regularly. 



During the war, Ralph Waldo Emerson, 
the WLS organist, and Buster Keaton, the 
dead-pan movie star, became fast friends. 
It all came about because both played in 
various overseas entertainments staged 
for the American soldiers. 



We all know about the news value of 
tl.i: man biting the dog and also of the 
value of the man dying from a dog bite. 
But a remarkable bit of news broke when 
Ed Prentiss, Chicago radio actor, was bit- 
ten by a dog recently . . . and the dog 
died! 




BEHIND many a young and 
lovely face is a mind rich in 
mature wisdom. The instinctive 
knowledge women seem to be 
born with. It commands . . .''Stay 
lovely as long as you can." 

So, you pay great attention to 
your complexion, your hair, your 
figure. Your dressing table looks 
like a queen's . . . gay with bright 
jars of creams and cosmetics. And 
if you know all of your beauty 
lore, there'll be in your medicine 
chest a certain little blue box. 

Ex-Lax, its name. And its role 
in your life is to combat one of 
your worst enemies to loveliness 
and health . . . constipation. You 
know what that does to your 
looks! 

Ex-Lax is ideal for you. Because 
it is mild, gentle, it doesn't strain 



your system. It is thorough. You 
don't have to keep on increasing 
the dose to get results. And it is 
such a joy to take ... it tastes just 
like delicious chocolate. 

Get a box today! 10c and 25c 
boxes ... at any drug store. 



MAIL THIS COUPON — TODAY! 
EX-LAX, Inc., P.O. Box 170 
Times-Plaza Station, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
FH5 Please send free sample of Ex-Lax. 



Name 

Address 



(// you live in Canada, write Ex-Lax, Lid., 
736 Notre Dame St. W., Montreal) 



When Nature forgets — 
remember 

EX- LAX 



THE ORIGINAL CHOCOLATED LAXATIVE 

Tune in on "Strange as it Seems", new Ex-Lax Radio Program. See local newspaper for station and time. 



71 



RADIO MIRROR 



co4t Jm: uquAa 

witha 

MAYBELLINE 



EYE 

BEAUTY 

AIDS 




Maybelline Eyelash Darkener 

instantly darkens eyelashes, 
making them appear longer, 
darker, and more luxuriant. It 
is non-smarting, tear-proof and 
absolutely harmless. The largest 
selling eyelash beautifier in the 
world. Black, Browa and the 
NEW BLUE. 



Maybelline Eyebrow Pencil 

smoothly forms the eyebrows 
into graceful, expressive lines, 
giving a perfect, natural effect. 
Of highest quality, it is entirely 
harmless, and is clean to use and 
to carry. Black and Brown, 



Maybelline Eye Shadow 
delicately shades the eyelids, 
adding depth, color, and sparkle 
«»WXsj to the eyes. Smooth and creamy, 
absolutely pure. Blue, Brown, 
Blue-Gray, Violet and Green. 



Maybelline Eyelash 
Tonic Cream 
A pure and harmless tonic 
cream, helpful in keeping the 
eyelashes and eyebrows in good 
condition. Colorless. 

Maybelline Eyebrow Brush 

Regular use of this specially 
designed brush will train the 
brows to lie flat and smooth at 
all times. Extra long, dainty-grip 
handle, and sterilized bristles, 
kept clean in a cellophane wrapper. 



These famous preparations in 10c sizes mean 
simply that you can now enjoy complete highest 
quality eye make-up without the obstacle of 
cost. Try them and achieve the lure of lovely 
eyes simply and safely, but . . . insist upon 
genuine MAYBELLINE preparations . . . for 
quality, purity, and value. Purse sizes obtain- 
able at all leading 10c stores. 

Maybelline Co. .Chicago. 





EYE BEAUTY AIDS 



Doris Robbins, who has been singing 
with Ben Pollack's orchestra over the net- 
works from Chicago, got her start when 
the late Florenz Ziegfeld made her Ruth 
Etting's understudy in the cast of 
"Whoopee." Ruth was taken ill and 
Doris played her part for nearly two 
years. When Ruth passed through Chi- 
cago recently both Doris and Ireene 
Wicker met her at the train. Ireene was 
present because she wanted to interview 
Ruth to get a story for her famous 
"Singing Lady" broadcasts. 



The vacation problem was solved nicely 
by two Chicago actresses whose constant 
work didn't permit them even a week 
away from the studio. The girls were 
June Meredith, leading lady of First 
Nighter and Ann Seymour, star of the 
Grand Hotel broadcast. Each took the 
other's work in addition to doing her own 
for two weeks. Thus each got a full two 
weeks' vacation. 



Local NBC sound effects men have 
rigged up their door bells so they can ring 
them with their feet, thus leaving their 
hands free for such other duties as mak- 
ing noise for forest fires, winds, etc. 



Sunburn is a common summer com- 
plaint in Chicago. But Joan Blaine, lead- 
ing lady of the Princess Pat players, went 
that stunt one better by staying under a 
hair dryer so long she fainted from the 
heat and almost missed a broadcast. 



Doris Wester comes from Chicago. She 
sang on one of Major Bowes' amateur 
hours not long ago and within a few days 
was hired to work with Ray Noble's or- 
chestra in Radio City's famous club, the 
Rainbow Room. It was just one of those 
breaks. A director of the corporation 
which runs the Rainbow Room happened 
to hear that broadcast and hired her on 
the spot. 

Such breaks do come to people some- 
times. For instance Leonard Keller, the 
Chicago orchestra leader, was idling dur- 
ing an intermission of his band at the 
Bismarck Hotel. His accordionist struck 
up a tune to fill the intermission and 
suddenly a girl in the audience began to 
whistle the number, softly but not so 
softly that Keller didn't hear it. She was 
doing it for her own amusement. But 
Keller brought her up to the stand and 
went through some number with her. The 
next Sunday she became part of his 
WBBM "Gloom Dodgers" program. 



An unusual broadcast was done by WLS 
the other day when Phil La Mar Ander- 
son interviewed Mrs. Ethel Sampson of 
Evanston, 111. After doing needlework 
for more than three years and after writ- 
ing hundreds of letters, Mrs. Sampson 
had completed a unique historical quilt 
containing bits from neckties and gowns 
worn by famous Americans. Those who 
sent her neckties for her quilt included 
President Roosevelt, Gen. Hugh S. John- 
son, Admiral Byrd, Chief Justice Hughes, 
Floyd Gibbons and all the members of 
the president's cabinet. Women who con- 
tributed bits from their dresses included 
Mrs. Roosevelt, the late Jane Addams, 
Amelia Earhart and Mary Pickford. Even 
the famous Dionne quintuplets are repre- 
sented . . . and don't tell me you don't 
know what they sent her! 




Crooked Spines 
Made Straight 



GREATLY BENEFITED 
OR ENTIRELY CURED 
An Elderly Lady, all bent 
over, was straightened won- 
derfully. A Grateful Father 
writes his daughter had a 
bad curvature, yet was 
completely straightened. A 
Man helpless, unable to 
stand or walk, was riding 
horseback and playing ten- 
nis within a year. A Little 
Child, paralyzed, was play- 
ing about the house in 3 
M weeks. A Doctor, confined 
to a wheel chair for 8 years, was walking in 
3 months' time. Thousands of sufferers have 
found relief, benefit or cure through the 
PHILO BURT METHOD. Over fifty-nine 
thousand cases in the past 30 years. 

30 DAYS 1 TRIAL 

We will prove its value in your own case. The 
Philo Burt Appliance is light 
in weight and comfortable to 
wear — entirely different from 
the old, torturing, plaster-casts, 
leather and celluloid jackets 
or steel braces. Every af- 
flicted person with a weak- 
ened, injured, diseased or 
deformed spine owes it to 
himself to investigate. Doc- 
tors recommend it, and the 
price within reach of all. 

Send for Information. 
If you will describe your 
case it will aid us in giving 
you definite information at 
once. 

PHILO BURT COMPANY 

136-23 Odd Fellows Temple 
Jamestown. New York 





DANCE 50^ 



LEARN 
TO 

Why be a lonely, unpopular wall-flower 
when you can learn all the smart dances 
from the most modern to the old favorites — 
at home, in private without teacher, mueio 
or partner? Complete course of old fa- 
vorites, including Tango, Waltz, etc., only 
50c; so simple even a child can learn quickly. 
Send stamps, caeb or M. O. Large course 60 illus- 
trations, includes Tap Dancing, Tango, etc $L98. 
(C. O. D. orders 25c extra and postage.) 

FREE a rare Lucky Chinese Coin. 
FRENCH ROY. Box 131 Varfck Sta. 

New York, N. Y. : i ; Dept. 149 











CThis FRAME is FREE 

J ^^^v with eachVHOSOor 
*SM fe. SNAPSHOT 
ENLARGEMENT 




foronfy98? 



i Simply send us your PHOTO 
I or SNAPSHOT, and in about 
one week you will receive a 
Beautiful Enlargement, ezact- 
" t like the original, in an Artis- 
tic 5x6 Frame as illustrated. 
Also 8x10 Enlargement, with 
wall frame, 98c. SPECIAL: 
11x14, 10x16, 14x20, or 16x20. 
Enlargements (unframed), with hand-colored Button of your Photo 89c. 
<!pnri Nn MnilPvl Just pay maHman price of enlargement desired plus 
OCHU rlU mUliej. postage. Or remit with order and we pay 
poHtaue Orieinaln returned Send Photo today. You'll be delighted. 
AITON ART STUDIOS. Deot.Sll-A.48S6N.DamenAve.,Chlcago 



JVetv 
MYSTERY: 
LAMP := 



'HI 



LIGHTS THE WHOLE HOUSE 7/frr^ 



NEW kind of lamp now combines best features of gas, 
electric and oil lighting. Burns cheapest fuel-air 
mixture. The amazing discovery of a famous Akron, 
Ohio inventor. Lights every room in the house, at less 
than one-tenth the Cost of cheapest old-style lamps. 
No piping, wiring or installation whatever. Nothing 
under the sun equals it. 300 candle power of brilliant, 
soft light like sunlight, prevents eye 
strain. Simple, safe, easy to operate. 
Ideal for farms, small-town or sub- 

burban homes. Charming, beautiful, amaz- 
iDgly useful. TRY IT IN YOUR HOME 
FOR; SO DAYS. Send no money now. Juot 
your name and address for liberal intro- 
ductory offer. Learn bow you can qret your 
lamp FREE of one penny coat. Write quick 
AKRON LAMP COMPANY, 
121 Lamp Bldg., AKRON, OHIO. 



AGENTS! 

Some thins really 
new I New prod' 
net. New plans. 
New chance for $8 
an hour even in 
spare time. Lamp 
free to workers. 
Write NOW I 



72 



RADIO MIRROR 



Stream-lining Connie Gates 

(Continued from page 31) 

"I liked my new make-up so much," 
Connie remarked, "that it was a distinct 
shock to see my next publicity pictures 
and realize that they didn't show the 
same improvement. Back again I went to 
the movie make-up man, with the result 
that 1 now have a third make-up, much 
darker and heavier — in short, a definite 
movie make-up for photographic work. 
You see, the ordinary make-up does not 
stand up under the intense lights used for 
photography, whereas movie make-up, 
which has been developed to withstand 
the burning glare of Kleig lamps, does." 

So, now, if you see Connie Gates hurry- 
ing to the studio at noon, or broadcasting 
her new Moon Glow program during the 
evening, or in her latest photograph, she 
will be the same Connie Gates. The three 
make-ups are different, but they achieve 
identical effects. 

Incidentally, Connie's use of movie 
make-up for photographic work has 
proved such a success that the major net- 
works are beginning to use it for all pub- 
licity photography, but it is so new that 
many of the stars are not yet aware of it. 

ONLY this afternoon," Connie said. "I 
posed for some publicity pictures, 
then hadn't time to remove the movie 
make-up before going on to a broadcast. 
As I reached the studio I met Fred War- 
ing, and a moment later, Mark Warnow. 
They greeted me in almost the same 
words: 'Hello, Connie. I didn't know you 
were making a movie.' " 

"Of course," she added, "not many girls 
will need movie make-up for photo- 
graphic work, but I believe that experi- 
menting with make-up until just the right 
effect is gained, then trying to duplicate 
that same effect with darker cosmetics 
for evening wear, will do wonders for 
everyone." 

Next came the question of clothes. 
Connie studied the leading fashion maga- 
zines, the creations of the most famous 
designers, to determine which of the cos- 
tumes most nearly typified the person she 
wished to be As a result she has dis- 
carded the "home cooky" wardrobe for 
the smart styles shown in her later pic- 
tures. She prefers clothes whose beauty 
lie in distinction of line rather than in 
elaborateness of design. ("I have one 
dress with ruffles," she admits, "but it's 
terrible, and I never wear it!") Her fa- 
vorites are sports and tailored things 
which are such a complement to her slen- 
der athletic figure. She revels in smart 
skirts and sweaters, carelessly knotted gay 
bandannas, topcoats with flaring revers to 
accentuate her slimness. She has discov- 
ered that brilliant colors are much more 
becoming than the subdued shades she 
used to wear. 

"And how I love bright colors," she 
gloated. "For the first time, clothes buy- 
ing is a thrill, an adventure, even if it 
means only a bright handkerchief to wear 
with a tailored suit. Clothes now add zest 
and meaning to life. If I try on a new- 
dress and it doesn't make me feel hap- 
pier, give me that 'something exciting 
will happen to me in this dress' feeling, 
then off it comes and I make another 
selection." 

With the clothes and make-up ques- 
tions settled, Connie took up the matter 
of diction and carriage, signing up with 
the American Academy of Dramatic Arts 
as the quickest means of improving them. 

"I didn't want to acquire an accent," 
she explained, "or a sinuous, slinky man- 
ner of walking. I did want to develop the 





FOR HER AGE 

AMD 
UNDERWEIGHT 

TOO 



wtifvu oudwtc 6&z flu liMUf 
Dtffiu tiskev?<4ujr id? uew/ 



EVEN ON tiptoes, Betty was smaller 
than the smallest playmate of her own 
age. While other youngsters shot up, filled 
out, gained in height and weight — Betty 
remained thin, scrawny, small for her age 
— because she did not drink enough milk. 
But you ought to see Betty now! How 
she has added inches to her height — how 
strong, sturdy, well-proportioned she has 
become. And the reason is that Betty is 
now drinking every day, a quart of milk 
mixed with Cocomalt. 

Milk is the almost perfect food for chil- 
dren. Mixed with Cocomalt, it provides 
extra carbohydrates for body heat and phys- 
ical activity; extra proteins for solid flesh 
and muscle; extra food-calcium, food-phos- 
phorus and Sunshine Vitamin D for the 
formation of strong bones, sound teeth. 

Help your child gain as he grows 

The famous Lanarkshire milk experiment 
in 1930 among 20,000 school children 
shows definitely that children who received 



milk daily during the test grew faster and 
were healthier than those who did not. 

If milk alone can aid growth and im- 
prove nutrition, think what an advantage 
your child will have if you give him Coco- 
malt in milk. For, made as directed, Coco- 
malt almost DOUBLES the food-energy 
value of every glass or cup of milk. 

Cocomalt is accepted by the American 
Medical Association, Committee on Foods. 

Wonderful for adults, too 

Not only does Cocomalt and milk help 
children thrive, but for grown-ups, with 
its nutritional value and extra food- 
energy, it is a pleasant way to maintain and 
restore strength. A hot drink promotes 
relaxation for sound, restful sleep, drink 
Cocomalt HOT before retiring. 

Cocomalt is sold at grocery, drug and depart- 
ment stores in ^-lb., 1-lb. and 5-lb. hospital-size 
air- tight cans. 

SPECIAL TRIAL OFFER: For a trial-size can 
of Cocomalt, send name and address (with 10c to 
cover cost of packing and mailing) to R. B. Davis 
Co., Dept.NAll.Hoboken, N. J. 




com 




Prepared as directed, adds 70% 
mare food-energy to milk 




Cocomalt is accepted by the Committee on Foods of the American Medical Association. Produced 
by an exclusive process under scientific control. Cocomalt is composed of sucrose, skim milk, 
selected cocoa, barley maJt extract .flavoring and added Sunsblne Vitamin D. (Irradiated ergosterol. J 



73 




0<m 



-bo MAKE 
MORE MONEY 



I'll train you Quickly 
for Good Spare Time 
and Full Time Jobs 

in RADIO 





Set Servicing 

Spare time set ser- 
vicing pays many 
N.R.I, men $200 to 
$1,000 a year. Full 
time servicemen 
make as much as 
$:-iO.$50, $75 a week.. 




Broadcasting 
Stations 

Employ managers, 
engineers, operators, 
installation and 
maintenance men 
for jobs paying up 
to $5,000 a year. 




Loud Speakers 

Making, installing, 
servicing Loud 
Speakers are money- 
making jobs for 
men with Radio 
Training. 



Why slave your life away in a no- 
future job? Why skimp, why scrape 
trying to pay your bills? I'll train 
you quickly for a field with a future 
—RADIO. $30, $50, $75 a week— 
that's what many Radio Experts 
make. $5, $10, $15 a week extra 
is what many make in spare time 
while learning. My FREE book tells 
you about Radio's spare time and 
full time opportunities — about my 
tested training — about my students 
and graduates — what they are doing 
and earning. Get this Free Book. 

Get Ready Now for Jobs 
Like These 

Spare time and full time Radio 
Servicing, Installing, Operating, 
Servicing Broadcast, Aviation Radio, 
Commercial, Ship and Television 
stations, and a Radio service busi- 
ness of your own. I'll train you for 
these and other opportunities in the 
manufacture, sale and service of 
Radio, Loud Speaker, and Tele- 
vision apparatus. My FREE book 
tells you about the many money- 
making opportunities in Radio. My 
graduate, Frank Reese, 222 S. 60 
St., Philadelphia, Pa., makes $300 a 
month profit in his own business. 
Henry Bollman, Gasconade Co., 
Bland, Mo., has made as high as 
$250 a month. 

Many Radio Experts Make 

$i0, 550, $75 a Week 

I'll train you quickly and inex- 
pensively right in your own home 
and in your spare time. My practical 
50-50 method of training makes 
learning at home easy, fascinating, 
practical and rapid. Many of my 
successful graduates didn't even fin- 
ish grade school. 

Many Make $5, $10, $15 a Week 

Extra in Spare Time While 

Learning 

My Training is famous as "the Course 
that pays for itself." The day you 
enroll I start sending you Extra 
Money Job Sheets which quickly show 
you how to do Radio repair jobs com- 
mon in every neighborhood. C. N. 
Heffelfinger, R. F. D. No. 1, Temple. 
Pa., makes $15 a week in his spare 
time. Anthony Yeninas, 269 Vine St., 
Plymouth, Pa., made over $300 in 
spare time while taking my Course. 

Find Out What Radio 
[Offers You 

Act today. Mail the coupon. Any 
ambitious fellow over 15 years old 
can get a free copy of my book. It 
tells about Radio's opportunities — 
about my Money Back Agreement — 
shows you what graduates are doing 
and earning. No obligation. Mail 
the coupon now. 

X. E. SMITH, Pres. 

National Radio Institute 

Dept. 5MT 

Washington, D. C. 



^FREE 



PROOF) 






J. E. SMITH, President 
National Radio Institute 
Dept. 5MT 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Smith: Without obligat- 
ing me, (tend free hook about 
Bpare time and full time Radio 
opportunities and how I can train 
fur them at home in spare time. 

(Please print plainly) 



NAME AGE 



ADDRESS 

CITY STATE . 



RADIO MI RROR 

best characteristics of my own speech and 
carriage, learn wherein they were wrong, 
and correct them, and through my dra- 
matic school work they have been im- 
proved." ("Improved, my eye," I said, 
noting her graceful, unhurried walk to 
the ringing telephone, her low-pitched, 
clear enunciation as she answered it. "Per- 
fect, I calls it!") 

"School work has given me increased 
poise and self-confidence," she continued, 
returning from the phone, "and these 
are certainly necessary ingredients to 
beauty. No one ever heard of a really 
beautiful woman who lacked poise. 

"Class work has also increased my 
powers of observation, given new mean- 
ing to the people and things around me. 
Part of our work" in make-up is to ob- 
serve people on the streets and try to 
make up to represent them, not only 
their external appearance, but the char- 
acteristics that their appearance indicates. 
This increased interest in people makes 
me more interesting to them. 

"I don't mean that everyone needs to 
go to dramatic school. I simply needed 
instruction quickly and in concentrated 
form, but I firmly believe that the aver- 
age girl, by listening. to good speech and 
observing graceful posture, can effect a 
remarkable improvement in herself." 

"What effect hds all this revamping 
had on your work?" I asked. 

I ENJOY it more, for one thing," Con- 
nie replied. "I seem to have more 
ideas about the kinds of programs people 
will like. You know, in radio tastes in en- 
tertainment vary overnight; programs 
have to vary with them. I find that my 
new appearance and clothes, my broadened 
interests, make it easier for me to meet 
these demands by making it easier for me 
to vary my programs and song delivery. 
I've always loved modern music and 
lyrics; now I'm experimenting with them, 
which makes them more enjoyable. On 
my new program, of course, I'm still a 
blues and rhythm singer, but for con- 
trast I'm treating some of the rhythm 
numbers as ballads. 

"Also, I'm more conscious than I've 
ever been before of the need for chang- 
ing my pace. I've seen so many radio 
stars shoot to the top, enjoy a period of 
brief popularity, then plunge again into 
obscurity. Some of them seem to go soft 
with success, content to drift along without 
doing anything to make that success per- 
manent. 1 believe the more alive you are 
to the fact that change in radio demands 
is swift and inevitable, the better you are 
able to meet that change." 

"But what do your family and friends 
think of the change? And aren't you 
sometimes surprised at yourself?" 

"Surprised! I'm almost frightened! I 
would be frightened if I didn't know that 
I haven't changed fundamentally. There 
are interests, feelings, opinions that I'll 
always have, that nothing will ever 
change. And I know I haven't changed 
in these fundamentals because my family 
and friends do like the new me. They 
wouldn't like me if I'd changed inside, and 
they'd lose no time in telling me so. As 
it is they're glad that I've broadened 
my interests and that I have found new 
zest in living." 

So there you have it, the swift transi- 
tion from plainness to vital, arresting 
beauty. And the next time you hear 
Connie Gates' contralto voice over the 
air don't envy her because she doesn't 
need to be beautiful. Envy her, rather, 
because she is beautiful, because by her 
own efforts she has achieved glamor. 
Then go and do likewise. You can. You 
have Connie's word for that! 




How to wash Blonde 

hair 2 to 4 shades 

lighter — safely ! 

Blondes, why put up with dingy, stringy, 
dull-looking hair? And why take 
chances with dyes and ordinary sham- 
poos which might cause your hair to fade 
or darken? Wash your hair 2 to 4 shades 
lighter with Blondex — safely. Blondex is 
not a dye. It is a shampoo made espe- 
cially to keep blonde hair light, silky, fas- 
cinatingly beautiful. It's a powder that 
quickly bubbles up into a foamy froth 
which removes the dust-laden oil film 
that streaks your hair. You'll be delighted 
the way Blondex brings back the true 
golden radiance to faded blonde hair — 
makes natural blonde hair more beauti- 
ful than ever. Try it today. Sold in all 
good drug and department stores. 

LEG SUFFERERS 

Why continue to suffer? Do some- 
thing to secure quick relief. Write 
today for New Booklet — "THE LIEPE 
METHOD OF HOME TREATMENT." 
It tells about Varicose Veins, Varicose 
Ulcers, Open Leg Sores, MUk or Fever Leg, 
Eczema. Liepe Method works while you 
walk. More than 40 years of success. 
Praised and endorsed by thousands. 1 

LIEPE METHODS. 3284 N. Green Bay Ave., 
Dept. M-16, Milwaukee, Wis. 

ARTIFICIAL 

LASHES 

BROUGHT TO YOU FOR THE FIRST 
TIME AT A REASONABLE PRICE! 

The eecret of the captivating beauty of movie 
etarsi Long, dark, lnstrous lashes that transform eyea into bewitch- 
ing: pools of irresistible fascination. Makea the eyes look larfirer.more 
brilliant, and far more expressive. Try a pair of theBe wonderful 
lashes and yon will be surprised at each magic charm so easily ac- 
qaired. Qnickly pat on by anyone, absolutely safe, can be used again 
and again. Mailed promptly on receipt of price. 35c pair, 3 pair $1.00. 

MITCHELL BEAUTY PRODUCTS, 1002-M Washington. Si. Louis. Mo. 

ANY PHOTO ENLARGED 

Size 8x10 inches 
or smaller if desired. 

tiame price for full length 
or buat form, groups, land- 
Bcapos, pet animals, etc.. 
or enlargements of any 
vart of group picture. Safe 
return o£ original photo 
guaranteed, "" 

SEND NO MONEY 

(any aizo) and within a week you will 

your beautiful life-like enlargement, l 

teed fadeleBe. Pay postman 47c plus postal. _ 

or send 49o with order and wo pay postage. Big 

6x20 inch enlargement Bent C. O. D. 78c plus * 

postage or send 80c and we pay postage. Take advantage of this 

offer now. Send your photos today. Specify sine wanted, 

STANDARD ART STUDIOS 
104 S. Jefferson Street, Dept. 1S45-P, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 






NEW EXCLUSIVE 
FEATURES 



Get This Meney-Haker MOW! 

AMAZING HEW 

HAHD'BAGj 

WOMEN BUY j 
IT OH 5ICHT 



MISS AMERICA" 
Handbag — brand 
new, different — and HOW it 
sells! Exclusive features. Beautiful modern- 
istic design. Genuine Top-Quality Steerhide. Two roomy "Talon 

Zipper Locked" C .r -.,1m (or 100% SAFETY— PRIVACY. 

TRIFLE FITTED!— coin purse, mirror, key case. Initials and 
full name engraved in 22K Gold FREE. Women rave about this 
new BAG. Men and women agents cleaning up big profits! Light- 
ning seller everywhere. Write at once for 

FREE SAMPLE OFFER, ffjl" JSS"Z 

HALVORSEN INC., Dept. F-19, 605W. Washington. Chicago 



74 



RADIO MI RROR 



Coast-to-Coast Highlights 
Pacific 



(Continued from page II) 

Adverse" on the bus to and from the 
studios. 

You've heard of Charlie Lung the "man 
with a hundred voices," in Angeleno radio 
circles. Well, not to be outdone, San 
Francisco bobs up with George Goode, 
the "man with a thousand voices." Looks 
like one of those chamber of commerce 
lights where one thriving burg tries to 
outshine another. He's with KFRC. In 
case you're curious . . . Charlie was the 
whippervvill in "Judge Priest," the parrot 
in "Charlie Chan's Courage" and the fly- 
ing mouse in some of the Disney crea- 
tions. 

The coffee shop at 111 Sutter Street, 
San Francisco, is minus a waitress. And 
Dresser Dahlstead, NBC's youngest coast 
mikeman, (twenty-four) has a charming 
wife. Seems as though all the network 
lads dash downstairs for a cup of coffee 
between mike stints. D. D. made the 
trip more frequently as the days rolled 
by. Then blonde Blanche Lowry de- 
serted the counter and urn and became 
Mrs. Dahlstead. They were married in 
Blanche's home town of Salem. Mr. 
Dahlstead is a University of Utah grad- 
uate and announces Standard School 
broadcasts, Woman's Magazine of the 
Air and others. 



Cedric C. Davey seems to be the new 
voice on KQW in San Jose, though he 
has been in the bay region for some time. 
He was born in Freemantle, West Aus- 
tralia, came here at the age of sixteen, 
and has been a radio technician in addi- 
tion to the newer proclivities as an offi- 
cial mike spokesman. 



Archie Presby, NBC coast announcer, 
saw his son a month or so ago for the 
first time. It happened like this. Mrs. 
Presby was in Portland, Ore., when young 
Donald Grant Presby made his appear- 
ance early in the summer but it was 
early fall before the fond father could 
get away to go north to see the new 
arrival. 

* * * 

If coaching is any help, Harold Mc- 
Bride ought to make good. The new 
tenor find of KFOX in Long Beach has 
the same teacher who instructed Donald 
Novis. 

* * * 

Aviation seems to have taken KHJ by 
storm. The roll call includes Bill Good- 
win, production man, who is a newcomer 
to aviation; Sam Pierce, sound effects man, 
who has more than a hundred hours to 
his credit; Don Hopkins, bass fiddle 
player, who was a wartime flyer; Don 
McBain, youthful technician, and a 
novice in the air; John Mclntyre, actor, 
somewhat of an oldtimer and Virgil 
Reimer, sound man, just starting. There's 
Freeman Lang, transcription producer, 
also who is just trying for his license. 
He flew a jenny in 1914 for the Marine 
Corps but that service doesn't count these 
days. 

* * * 

My chief snooper sends me the fol- 
lowing reports: Tom Dale, of KFWB, 
is really Tom Scholts. He does the radio 




\\ 




// 



No 



lor lips that want romance 



It's a clever girl who keeps her 
lips an ardent invitation to ro- 
mance. But lips can't be that . . . 
if the skin is dried and roughened by Lip- 
stick Parching. 

So, you must ask your Lipstick to do 
more than merely tint your lips. It should 
protect the texture . . . keep that sensitive 
skin smooth and petal-soft. That's where 
so many lipsticks fail. Some seem actually 
to leave the lips rougher. 

Coty has proved that lipstick can give 
you the most exciting color . . . indelible 
color ... without any parching penalties! 





Try the new Coty "Sub-Deb" 
Lipstick and see! It actually 
smooths and softens lips. That's 

because it contains"Essence of Theobrom," 

a special softening ingredient. 

Make the "Over-night" Experiment! 

The "over-night" test has convinced many 
girls that Coty Lipstick is every bit as re- 
markable as we say. Just put on a tiny bit 
of the lipstick before you go to bed. In the 
morning — rejoice! Your lips are smooth 
and soft as camellia petals! 

Coty "Sub-Deb" comes in 5 indelible col- 
ors, 50c. Coty "Sub-Deb" Rouge, also 50c. 
A revelation! Coty "Air Spun" Face Pow- 
der . . . with a new tender texture. 



SUB- DEB" LIPSTIC 



K^O/ 



75 



RADIO MIRROR 



Startling New Discoveries 

Explain Why Pacific Ocean 

Sea Plant Can Now 

Quickly Build Up 

Weak Rundown 
Skinny Folks I 




How Thousands of Pale, Sickly, Tired 
Out, Nervous Folks Can Now— By Making 
This One Simple Change Which Cor- 
rects IODINE STARVED GLANDS— 
Build Rugged New Strength And Often 
Add 5 Lbs. in 1 Week 

As the result of tests covering thousands of weakened, 
rundown, nervous folks, science now claims that it is 
glands starving for iodine that keep folks pale, tired out, 
underweight and ailing. When these glands — particularly 
the important gland which controls weight and strength — 
lack NATURAL PLANT IODINE, even diets rich in 
starches and fats fail to add needed pounds. That's why 
skinny people often have huge appetites yet stay weak and 
skinny. 

Now, however, with the introduction of Kelpamalt — a 
mineral concentrate derived from a huge 90-foot sea vege- 
table harvested off the Pacific Coast — you ran be assured 
of a rich, concentrated supply of this precious substance. 
1300 times richer in iodine than oysters, Kelpamalt at 
last puts food to work for you. Its 12 other minerals 
stimulate the digestive glands which alone produce the 
juices that enable you to digest fats and starches. 
3 Kelpamalt tablets contain more iron and copper than 
1 lb. of spinach or iy% lbs. of fresh tomatoes, more Iodine 
than 1386 lbs. lettuce, etc., etc. 

Start Kelpamalt today. Even if you are 
"naturally skinny," or if you have been 
weak and rundown for some time, you 
must add 5 lbs. the first week, feel better, 
sleep better, have more strength than ever 
before or the trial is free. 

100 jumbo size Kolpamalt Tablets cost 
but a few cents a day to use. Sold at all 
drug stores. If your dealer hasn't yet re- 
ceived his supply, send $1 for special in- 
troductory size bottle of 65 tablets to the 
address below. 

3 Steps in the 

Building of New Strength 

and Good Solid Flesh 

Ordinary food enters stomach 
and Is partially digested. 

Digestion completed in intes- 
tines and flesh-building ma- 
terial absorbed in blood stream. 

Metabolism, when regulated by 
glands kept healthy with 
iodine, assures conversion of 
material into firm, new flesh. 





Kelpamalt 



Ml 




SPECIAL FREE OFFER 

Write today for fascinating instructive 50-paizo book on 

HOW U, Uuil.l UpStrnriKlli uiid Wi-inlit Quickly, flinc-m] Conlnrit» 
of I or,.J ,,mj tt, f:lr ,.",„.(„ or , the tnimun body. N.-w fncU al.ntit 

NATURAL IODINK. SUn.hirtl wcirl.t ,.,id n,.-, t.i..i.t cliurU. 

Doily n.CiHiM for wei«ht b.iildinK. Absolutely free. No oblrK/.tion. 
Kelp. mult Co.. Dept. 574, 27-33 Wont 20th St.. New York City. 



work in his father's ad agency, but wanted 
to keep his air identity secret. He did 
for awhile . . . One of the Los Angeles 
radio editors lost a hat betting on 
whether George Burns (Mr. Gracie Allen) 
had a toupe or not. He lost the bet and 
the hat . . . Vera Oldham doesn't mind 
being called a boon doggier. The script 
lady creates lots of artistic things for 
house and garden which seems to class 
her in boon doggling, "a craft which 
weaves useful objects out of makeshift 
materials." 

* * * 

So Armand Girard came on back home. 
He went eastward for NBC a year ago, 
but in the fall returned to San Fran- 
cisco. The basso made his debut in 
Concordia, Kan., when eighteen years old. 
With his family he has returned to the 
northern part of California from which, 
in 1924, he made his first radio appear- 
ance. 

* * * 

Helen Stryker is the new voice you 
have been hearing on One Man's Family. 
She was on KOMO-KJR a. couple of 
years doing small bits. The big chance 
came last summer when she was south 
on vacation. She'll go back to Seattle 
about Thanksgiving time when the con- 
tract is up. Marian Galloway has been 
her name with the Barbour Family. 



Venna Taylor doesn't miss many of 
her vocal programs over KRKD. But 
what do you suppose happened to make 
her miss one a little while ago? She was 
locked up. It's a fact. Poor HI Venna 
was under lock and key. But not in the 
Los Angeles hoosegow. She was on jury 
duty, and the twelve jurymen and women 
were safely put away overnight to re- 
sume deliberations the following day. 



Maybe Jack Carter, KNX remote con- 
trol impresario, ought to change his 
name as the numerologists advised. No 
sooner had he recovered from a broken 
kneecap received in a ping-pong game 
than a couple of bold, bad burglars came 
along and cracked his jaw and bruised 
his face with some hefty punches after 
he had left the Paris Inn at one a.m. 
at the close of the program. The ruffians 
got twenty bucks from Jack, which ap- 
parently set an all-time record locally 
among the announcing fraternity. 



Wesley Tourtellotte, KFI organ grinder, 
borrows an idea from that stage com- 
edian who has worn the same pair of 
shoes on the boards for a couple of gen- 
erations. Wes carries an old pair and 
wears 'em every time he has a radio pro- 
gram. But he says it isn't to bring him 
luck — it's just because the old dogs begin 
to bark at this time of the year, and 
they get worse along about the time the 
rainy season is due. 



"Tiny" (Ed) Ruffner puffed up a lot 
when they had a chamber of commerce 
day for him in Seattle not so long ago. 
And who wouldn't stick out the chest a 
bit on going back to the old home town 
and being so honored? Way back in ye 
early days Tiny was on radio in Los An- 
geles, but he was a Seattle boy and went 
to high school and college there. Later 
he went on the chain as an announcer. 



Earl Towner, bespectacled leader of 
vocal groups and ex-orchestra leader, has 




What made their 
hair grow? 

Here is tlw Answer 

"New Hair came after I be- 
gan using Kotalko, and kept 

on growing," writes Mr. H. 

A. Wild. "In a short time 

I had a splendid head of hair, 

which has been perfect ever 

since." 

Mary H. Little also has lux- 
uriant hair now after using 

Kotalko. Yet for years her 

head, as she describes it, "yas 

as bare and as bald as the 

back of my hand." 

Many other men and women 

attest that hair has stopped 

falling excessively, dandruff 
has been decreased, new lux- 
uriant hair growth has been 
developed where roots were 
alive, after using Kotalko to 
stimulate scalp. 
Are your hair roots alive but 
dormant? If so, why not use 
Kotalko? Encourage new 
growth of hair to live on 
sustenance available in your 
scalp. Kotalko is sold at drug 
stores everywhere. 

FMtEJE BOX To prove the efficacy of Kotalko. 

for men's, women's and children's hair. Use coupon. 

Kotalko Co., 355-W, Station 0, New York 

Please send me Proof Box of KOTALKO. 

Name 

Full Address 




HANDS YOU A 
LIGHTED Cigarette 

Take a beautifully enameled Case 
from your vest pocket. Press a 
maeio buttonl Automatically 
tliere iB a Bpork — a name. A 
LIGHTED Cigarette— your fa- 
vorite brand — is delivered to your lipi 
SMOKE. A revolutionary invention . 
amazingly low priced. __Get_a Mag^ 




You PUFF.. 

nteed . . . 

for 15 Days' 




ITCHING r^ 



STOPPED IN ONE MINUTE 

For quick relief from the itching of pimples, blotches, 
eczema, rashes and other skin eruptions, apply Dr. 
Dennis' eooling, antiseptic, liquid D. D. D. Pre- 
scription. Its gentle oils soothe the irritated and 
inflamed skin. Clear, greaseless and stainless— dries 
fast. Stops the most intense itching instantly. A 35o 
trial bottle, at drug stores, proves it — or money back. 

D.D.D. PAsAc/U&tZ&vL 

don't WORRY 

Why put up with | ABOUT 

years of needless dis- 
comfort and worry ?Try 
a Brooks Automatic 
Air Cushion. This mar- 
velous appliance per- 
mits the opening to 
close, yet holds rupture 
securely.comfortably — 
day and night. Thousandsr eport amazing results. 
Light, neat-fitting. No hard pads, metal girdle 
or parts to chafe or gouge. Patented in U. S. and 
13 foreign countries. Try one 10 DAYS WITH- 
OUT A PENNY'S RISK. You'll be delighted. 
Free book on Rupture and convincing facts 
mailed pos tpaid in plain sealed envelope. Address 
BROOKS CO., 182C State St, Marshall, Mich. 



#*f PAID HOURLY 



MAKE BIG MONEY! 

Showing my sensational new, person 
allzed Hat and Cap Sample Line — fits CZ 
in pocket — displays values men grab 
for — rich felts — latest styles — superior 
Qualities. Priced low. We pay postage. 
Just write orders and pocket your profits. 
Nothing to deliver. Fit and Satisfaction 
Guaranteed. 

Complete Outfit Sent FREE! 
You don't invest a penny to 
get this money-making oppor- 
tunity. We give big cash bonus 
to producers — Get facts and 
sensational new money saving 
plan. You can start pocketing 
cash in five minutes. Rush 
name and address. 
TAYLOR HAT & CAP MFRS. 
Dept.'105-L, 15-17 W. 6th St. 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 



33 



Exclusive makers of fa- 
mous Taylor Rainproof 
Made-to-Measure Caps, 
the classy headwear. 
Smart new patterns — low 
prices — no experience 
needed to make big cash 
profits hourly. Elliot, 
Utah, took five orders 
the first 15 minutes. 



76 



RADIO MIRROR 



left KFRC for Chicago. He is looking 
after the glee club with Horace Heidt's 
Brigadiers. Maybe Mrs. T. and the three 
youngsters will journey there if Earl likes 
the place, though they have so long been 
a fixture in the musical life of Berkeley 
it would be quite an effort to be trans- 
planted. 



Coast fans are ready to fish for Aus- 
tralia again, now that the brisk days are 
at hand. Though short wave addicts can 
bring in almost anything in that line out 
here, the acid test is for fans to catch 
2GB, Sydney. Nowadays they are find- 
ing it on about 855 kilocycles. On Sep- 
tember first the powerful commercial 
changed wavelength, and is now on the 
frequency formerly used by 2BL, a gov- 
ernment station in the Antipodes. 



At last the secret is out about Colonel 
Rod, who narrates a fine NBC Sunday 
program, the Sperry Special, on the coast. 
It is Rod I lendrickson. long in the lumber 
business, but now writing and acting as 
the teller of tales on the half hour. He 
has taken a couple of hundred parts in 
the stories — sometimes three or four on 
a single broadcast. His "Castle Cragmont" 
tales are classics. 



Robert Leigh, radio tenor once of New 
York, Buffalo and Chicago, is ready to 
stage a comeback and this time on the 
coast. A year ago he came west and 
went up to a little place on the Chloride 
Cliffs overlooking Death Valley below and 
the twinkling lights of Boulder City 
miles in the distance. In boom times 
the spot had a census of 5,000 ... a ghost 
city of three people today. Now he has 
come back from the rest cure, and is 
being heard on Los Angeles radio outlets. 



KROW has been sending a booklet to 
fans. It's called "Muscle Bending." One 
request came addressed to Mr. Musel 
Bende, or so they say. 



THE MAD, MAD 
MARCH OF TIME 

Every twenty-four hours, while the 
world turns once on its orbit, 
earth's farthest flung outposts of 
civilization become the birth 
places of one of America's most 
exciting radio programs. The 
amazing story of how this unique 
five-times-a-week broadcast is put 
together, of the exciting routine 
which its harassed authors and 
producers go through every week 
day, is one of the finest RADIO 
MIRROR has ever published. 
Don't miss it, in next month's issue, 
on sale October 25. 




FEEL FOR LITTLE BUMPS! 

They Indicate Clogged Pores, the 'Beginning of Enlarged 
Pores, Blackheads and Other Blemishes! 



^ ^OCiAJ K^uJlML 



Don't trust to your eyes alone ! Most skin 
blemishes, like evil weeds, get well started un- 
derground before they make their appearance 
above surface. 

Make this telling finger-tip test. It may save 
you a lot of heartaches. Just rub your finger- 
tips across your face, pressing firmly. Give 
particular attention to the skin around your 
mouth, your chin, your nose and your forehead. 
t Now — does your skin feel absolutely smooth 
to your touch or do you notice anything like 
little bumps or rough patches? If you do feel 
anything like tiny bumps or rough spots, it's a 
sign usually that your pores are clogged and 
may be ready to blossom out into enlarged 
pores, blackheads, whiteheads, "dirty -gray" 
skin and other blemishes. 

A Penetrating Cream, the Need! 

What you need is not just ordinary cleansing 
methods, but a penetrating face cream — such 
a face cream as I have perfected. 

Lady Esther Face Cream penetrates the 
pores quickly. It does not just lie on the 
surface and fool you. Gently and sooth- 
ingly, it works its way into the little 
openings. There it "goes to work" on 
the accumulated waxy dirt — loosens 
it — breaks it up — and makes it easily 
removable. 

When you have cleansed your skin 
with Lady Esther Face Cream, you get 
more dirt out than you ever suspected 
was there. It will probably shock you 



to see what your cloth shows. But you don't 
have to have your cloth to tell you that your 
skin is really clean. Your skin shows it in the 
way it looks and feels. 

As Lady Esther Face Cream cleanses the 
skin, it also lubricates it. It resupplies the 
skin with a fine oil that overcomes dryness 
and keeps the skin soft, smooth and flexible. 
Thousands of women have overcome dry, 
scaly skin, as well as enlarged pores and 
coarse-textured skin, with the use of Lady 
Esther Face Cream. 

The Proof Is Free! 

But don't take my word for the cleansing and 
lubricating powers of this cream. Prove it to 
yourself at my expense. Upon receipt of your 
name and address, I'll send you a 7-day tube 
of Lady Esther Face Cream postpaid and free. 
Let the cream itself show you how efficient it is. 
With the free tube of Lady Esther Face 
Cream, I'll send you all five shades of my Lady 
Esther Face Powder, so you can see for your- 
self how the two go together to make a beau- 
tiful and lovely complexion. Write me today 
for the free cream and face powder. 



FREE 



(You can paste this on a penny postcard) (18) 
Lady Esther, 2034 Ridge Avenue, Evan-ion, Illinois 

Please send me by return mail your 7- day supply of Lady 
Esther Four-Purpose Face Cream; also all five shades of your 
Face Powder. 

Name i 



Address - 
City 



_ State- 



(If you live in Canada, write Lady Esther, Ltd., Toronto, Ont.) 



77 



Don't Fool 

Around with a 

COLD! 



A cold is an 
Internal Infection 

and Requires 
Internal Treatment 




i 



Every Four Minutes Some One 
Dies from Pneumonia, Trace- 
able to the "Common Cold!" 

T^ON'T "kid" yourself about a cold. It's 
-^ nothing to be taken lightly or treated trivi- 
ally. A cold is an internal infection and unless 
treated promptly and seriously, it may turn into 
something worse. 

According to published reports there is a 
death every four minutes from pneumonia 
traceable to the so-called "common cold." 

Definite Treatment 

A reliable treatment for colds is afforded 
in Grove's Laxative Bromo Quinine. It is no 
mere palliative or surface treatment. It gets at 
a cold in the right way, from the inside! 

Wotking internally, Grove's Laxative Bromo 
Quinine does four things of vital importance 
in overcoming a cold : First, it opens the bowels. 
Second, it combats the infection in the system. 
Third, it relieves the headache and fever. Fourth, 
it tones the system and helps fortify against 
further attack. 

Be Sure — Be Safe! 

All drug stores sell Grove's Laxative Bromo 
Quinine in two sizes— 3 5c and 50c. Get a pack- 
age at the first sign of a cold and be secure in 
the knowledge that you have taken a depend- 
able treatment. 

Grove's Laxative Bromo Quinine is the larg- 
est selling cold tablet in the world, a fact that 
attests to its efficacy as well as harmlessness. Let 
no one tell you he "has something better." 



GROVE'S LAXATIVE 

BROMO 
QUININE 



78 



RADIO M IRROR 

You Don't Know the 
Half of It! 



{Continued from page 29) 

But the twenty-five years that preceded 
this success were cold and bitter, sacri- 
ficed for a goal. 

Imprisoned in a German detention 
camp during the war, stranded in Chi- 
cago, after working in a dank night club, 
Victor's life story is awe inspiring in its 
similar ambitions. 

But the story of how each man gained 
the respect of the other is decidedly more 
important to radio, to you, and to me. 

A few minor arguments exploded be- 
hind the locked doors of the advertising 
agency. The Jolson personality domi- 
nated every incident. He insisted that 
Victor arrange the songs. The clever mu- 
sician yielded. After all, Victor figured, 
had not two other Jolson maestros 
sprouted from that job to more impres- 
sive ones? Lou Silvers became musical 
director at Warner Brothers studio, and 
Al Goodman is now a musical mogul. 
Victor played his cards carefully. 

Rehearsals were a wild melange of 
shouting voices, countermanded orders, 
and excited musicians. Bystanders were 
ejected by the page boys. 

"I can't sing without Martin," Al in- 
sisted. "He knows what I'm going to do 
before I do it." 

MARTIN FREED is Al Jolson's per- 
sonal accompanist, friend and con- 
fidante. 

Martin stationed himself in the con- 
trol room. Every few minutes he dashed 
out to whisper into his employer's ear. 
This kept up intermittently. It annoyed 
Victor who was striving for harmony 
among his men. Witnesses could feel 
the tension in the room. Finally Victor 
exploded, his face turning maroon, his 
black eyes bulging. 

"Al, this can't keep up," he insisted, 
"I'm leading this band, and no one else. 
Believe me, I'm here to help you and 
make this show a success." 

A hush fell over the crowded studio. 
What would Jolson do? Walk out? 
Square off and reenact the famous Win- 
chell brawl? The hired hands wondered, 
but kept their lips shut. 

Then Jolson spoke, softly, pleasantly. 
"Okay, Vicsy, you win." He turned to 
Freed and told him to stay out of the 
control room. Victor Young breathed a 
lot easier after that incident. Perhaps 
everybody had Al Jolson wrong. 

The first program, despite the drama 
behind the scenes, definitely established 
Al Jolson as a veteran with young ideas. 
Even the critics liked him. 

After the first broadcast, Victor re- 
turned home, weary and worn. He 
dragged his feet into the music library 
and sat down at the huge desk. His wife 
found him that way early next morning, 
staring into space. 

"Victor," she asked incredulously, "what 
in the world have you been doing?" 

Without turning his head, he answered, 
"I did something more important than 
writing arrangements. I think I finally 
understand Al Jolson. From now on 
things will work out better." 

His wife shook her head dubiously. 
"But how? ' she asked. 

"With discipline. It's the only way." 

The first opportunity Victor had to 
effect his plan was in the Jolson suite at 
the Hotel Sherry-Netherland the follow- 
ing Monday. Here, preliminary rehear- 
sals were held. Two men from the 
agency, Patsy Flick, the gag man, Mar- 



WAKE UP YOUR 
LIVER BILE- 

WITHOUT CALOMEL 

And You'll Jump out of Bed in 
the Morning Rarin' to Go 

THE liver should pour out two pounds of 
liquid bile into your bowels daily. If this 
bile is not flowing freely, your food doesn't 
digest. It just decays in the bowels. Gas bloats 
up your stomach. You get constipated. Your 
whole system is poisoned and you feel sour, 
sunk and the world looks punk. 

A mere bowel movement doesn't get at the 
cause. It takes those good, old Carter's Little 
Liver Pills to get these two pounds of bile 
flowing freely and make you feel "up and up". 
Harmless, gentle, yet amazing in making bile 
flow freely. Ask for Carter's Little Liver Pills 
by name. Stubbornly refuse anything else. 
25c at all drug stores. © 031, c. m. co, 



FDRYDUR CLASS-5DCIETY-CLUB 

Send For Free 1936 Catalog 

PINS h wl ■ . mt 1-, illver plated, enameled 1 or 2 color., any 3or 

4 letter* and year. Dot Price $3.50. Sterling or Gold Plate 

Ooz. $5. RINGS, Sterling Silver, .imilarly low priced. 

ukeri for 40 year*. Over 300 designa. Write todayl 

BASTIAN BROS. CO. 



PHOTOS ENLARGED j a £ h 

Florentine Oil Colors fl,*l(? 
8x10 - 7x9 - 6^x8'/ 2 j* f «f r %x 

Amazing, Lifelike, in natural colore. Bust, 
full length, Etc. Made from any size Photo, 
Snapshot, or Film. ORIGINALS RE- 
TURNED WITH ORDER. SPECIAL: 
THREE DIFFERENT 8x10— $1.00. FOUR 
6x8 or 5x7— $1.00. 11x14 — 60c. TWO 
11x14— $1.00. GxS or 6x7— Framed, 80c. 
8x10 Completely Framed— $1.00. All painted 
in royal oil colore. Send no money unless you 
Pay Postman, Plus Postage. Catalog 5c. 



\%&A MONARCH STUDIOS, RG-3S, McAdoo, Pa. 



rt Comers 

The real thing for mounting Snapshots, Cards, 
Stamps, etc. No paste needed. Neat, - 
easy to use for mounting prints tight or 
loose. Sold at photo supply and album 
counters or send 10£ today for pkg. 
of 100 and free samples. 
Engel Art Corners Co., Chicago, 111., 
Address Dept GO Y.*471? North. Clark St 









LIGHTEN YOUR HAIR 
WITHOUT PEROXIDE 



... to ANY Shade you Desire 
. . ■ SAFELY in 5 to 15 minutes 

Careful, fastidious women avoid the use ot 

Ccroxide because peroxide makes hair brittle. 
echler's Instantaneous Hair Ughtener 

requires NO peroxide. Used as a paste it can- 
not streak. Eliminates straw ' look. Beneficial to perma- 
nent waves and bleached hair. Lightens blonde h.ur — _ 

grown dark. This is the only preparation that also Ughtens\4 
the eoalp. No more dark roots. Used over 20 years by famousV I 
beauties, stage and ecrosn stars and children. Harmless, Quae- I, 
anteed. Mailed complete with brush for application m 

CDjrc* 36-page booklet "The Art of Lightening Hair 

tKlLE. Without Peroxide" Free with your first order. 

ERWIN F. LECHLER, Hair Beauty Specialist 

565 W. 181st St., New York, N. Y. 



Old Faces Made Young! 

A famous French beauty specialist recently as- 
tonished New York society by demonstrating that 
wrinkles, scrawny neck, 
"crow's feet", double chin 
and other marks of age are 
easily banished by spending 
only 5 minutes a day in 
your own home by an easy 
method of facial rejuvena- 
tion that any one can do. 

No cosmetics, no massage, 
no beauty parlor aids. 

The method is fully ex- 
plained with photographs in 
a thrilling book sent free up- 
on request in plain wrapper by PAULINE PALMER 
1024 Armour Boulevard, Kansas City, Missouri. 
Write before supply is exhausted. 

Name 

City State 




RADIO MIRROR 



tin Freed, AI, Victor and a stranger, 
lounging on the bed, were present. 

"Who is that fellow?" Victor asked 
Freed. 

"Al's bookie," was the reply. 

Before Al gets to work he does two 
things; calls Ruby, no matter where he is 
— Europe, New York, or Tia Juana — and 
then gets into a huddle with his book- 
maker. He will bet on anything that 
moves, from race horses to Western 
Union messenger boys. Once they were 
all closeted in the room when the bell 
rang. Al sprang up. 

"Five bucks to one it's a telegram 
from Ruby," he shouted, going toward 
the door. It was a good thing there were 
no takers. Al was right. 

After these two morning rituals, Al gets 
to work. How that man sings! It doesn't 
matter whether the audience is one that 
would overflow Yale Bowl or just fits 
comfortably in his spacious suite. Jolson 
always gives a finished performance. His 
keen mind has stored away the lyrics of 
over five hundred songs. New ones he re- 
members after scanning the composition 
only once. Unlike a lot of radio stars, Al 
Jolson can read music. Clad only in his 
silk shorts and an expensive-looking robe 
and horn-rimmed spectacles, Al substan- 
tiates Walter B. Pitkin's theory that life 
really begins at forty — or fifty. 

Al sang a chorus of "Quarter to Nine." 
He looked around furtively. Did they 
like ft? Only one dissenting voice arose. 
It was the bookmaker's. 

I DON'T like it, Al," he chirped. The 
others glared at him. But the meek 
man who knows so much about parlays, 
nags, and paddocks and so little about 
rhythms stood by his guns. 

"Okay, palsy," laughed Jolson, "I'll do 
it the way you like it." And believe it or 
not, Jolson actually changed the style of 
the song. The bookie smiled triumph- 
antly. 

At one o'clock Al looked at his watch. 
It was time to quit. Victor tried to exit 
gracefully, knowing that if he lingered 
he would have to go to the ball game or 
racetrack with the singer. 

But Al nabbed him at the door. "Vic, 
change that 'Latin from Manhattan' num- 
ber to April Showers' will you?" he asked. 

"Oh, Al," Victor answered, "it means 
rewriting the whole arrangement. We 
haven't time." 

"I can't help it. In my heart I feel I 
must sing April Showers.' " 

Jolson turned on his heel, but Victor 
refused to give in to the star's latest 
whim. It had happened several times be- 
fore. It meant hours of extra work for 
Victor. 

Victor told him bluntly, determinedly, 
that such changes of plan were unfair. 
Jolson listened sympathetically. Then he 
spoke: 

"Okay, Vicsy, hereafter I won't change 
a tune after Wednesday." 

The plan was working! 

The next week Victor had just com- 
pleted the program's entire musical score 
when the telephone jingled. It was Al. 

"Hello, Vicsy," he spoke pleasantly. "I 
know it's too late but in my heart I know 
1 must sing 'Mammy's Coal Black Rose' 
and not 'Wonderbar.' Could you possibly 
change it?" 

Victor changed it gladly. But he had 
made Jolson realize the trouble it caused. 
When Jolson realizes he is doing some- 
thing unjust it hurts him terribly. But 
not enough people have had the nerve to 
argue with him. He's been spoiled like a 
baby. 

Jolson's energy is keyed to lightning 
gear. Quite often he rouses the sleepy 
Freed in the wee hours of the morning 



THERE'S A GIRL ID 
LIKE TO MEET! 



Yet 3 weeks ago they laughed at her skinny shape 




Posed by professional models 

NEW "7-POWER" ALE YEAST EASILY 

ADDS 5 to 15 LBS.- in few weeks 1 . 

NOW there's no need for thousands to be "skinny" and 
friendless, even if they never could gain before. 
Here's a new treatment for them that puts on pounds 
of solid, naturally attractive flesh — in just a few weeks! 

Doctors now know that the real reason why great numbers 
of people find it hard to gain weight, and suffer with indiges- 
tion, constipation and a blemished skin, is that they do not 
get enough Vitamin B and iron in their daily food. Now with 
this new discovery which combines these two vital elements in 

.little concentrated tablets, hosts of men and women have put 

Ion pounds of firm flesh — in a very short time. 

I Not only are thousands quickly gaining normal good-looking pounds, but 

'also naturally clear skin, freedom from indigestion and constipation, new pep. 

7 times more powerful 

This amazing new product, Ironized Yeast, is made from special ale yeast 
imported from Europe, the richest known source of Vitamin B. By a new 
process the yeast is concentrated 7 times — made 7 times more powerful. 

But that is not all! This special vitamin-rich yeast is then ironized with 3 
kinds of iron which strengthen the blood, add wonderful energy. 

If you. too, are one of the many who simply need Vitamin B and iron to 
build them up, get Ironized Yeast tablets from your druggist at once. Day 
after day, as you take them, watch flat chest develop and skinny limbs round 
out to normal attractiveness. Skin clears to natural beauty, digestive troublea 
from the same source vanish, new health comes — you're a new person. 

Results guaranteed 



Lfew 



No matter how skinny and rundown you may be from lack of enough Vitamin 
, B and iron, this marvelous new Ironized Yeast should build you up in a 
short weeks as it has thousands. If not delighted with the results of the 
very first package, your money instantly refunded. 

Only don't be deceived by the many cheaply prepared "Yeast and Iron" 
tablets sold in Imitation of Ironized Yeast. These cheap counterfeits usually 
contain only the lowest grade of ordinary yeast and iron, and cannot give 
the same results as the scientific Ironized Yeast formula. Be sure you get 
the genuine. Look for "IY" stamped on each tablet. 



Special FREE offer! 



I To start you building up your health right away, we make this absolutely 
I FREE offer. Purchase a package of Ironized Yeast tablets at once, cut 
I out the seal on the box and mail it to us with a clipping of this para- 
graph. We will send you a fascinating new book on health, "New Facts 
About Your Body." Bemember, results guaranteed with the very first 
package — or money refunded. At all druggists. Ironized Yeast Co.. Inc., 
I Dept. 2211, Atlanta. Go. 



79 



RADIO' MIRROR 




7?Z€£ 

DEMONSTRATES 

MARRIAGE HYGIENE 




Doctor's 

Prescription 

WINS PRAISE 

of MILLIONS 

. . Over 45 

Years of 

Supreme 

Satisfaction 

for Users I 



MARRIAGE HYGIENE"— how much de- 
pends on those two words. With so 
much health and happiness at stake, no woman 
can be too careful in selecting the method to 
use. Dainty Boro-Pheno-Forms offer the ideal 
solution proved by 45 years of unbroken suc- 
cess. Originated as a doctor's prescription, 
Boro-Pheno-Forms quickly swept to nation- 
wide popularity. Thousands have written of 
continuous satisfaction for 5, 12, 17, 20 years 
or more. 

Send now for FREE SAMPLE which so 
fully demonstrates Boro-Pheno-Forms superi- 
ority. Learn how convenient. No bulky ap- 
paratus. Can be used in perfect secrecy ; no 
tell-tale antiseptic odor. Doubly effective, too 
— IMMEDIATE effectiveness on application, 
CONTINUED effectiveness afterward. 

Send no money; mail the coupon for FREE 

SAMPLE and booklet, "The Answer," which 

sheds welcome new light on"MarriageHygiene." 

Dr. Pierre Chemical Co., Dept. R-20 

162 N. Franklin St., Chicago, Illinois. 

DR. PIERRE CHEMICAL CO.— Dep~.~lt" ~ ' 
162 N. Franklin St., Chicago. Illinois 

Rush me FREE SAMPLE of Boro-Pheno-Form and 
FREE BOOKLET of Marriage Hygiene Facts. 

Name 



City. 



oheX 



ATHOME 



Learn easy Koehne Method of color- 
ing photos and miniatures in oil. New! No 
/art training needed. Big demand. Send for 
free booklet. Make Money At Home. 

NATIONAL ART SCHOOL 

3601 Michigan Ave. Dept. 1388, Chicago 



NO DIET -NO MEDICINES 
• NO EXERCISES • 

AN AMAZING invention called Roll- 
l\ ette, developed i n Rochester. Min- 
nesota, makes i t possible for you to rid 
yourself of unsightly pounds of fat 
and have a beautiful, slenderform. 
This remarkable patented device 
takes off fat quickly from any part 
of your body without strenuous 
diets, dangerous drugs, exercise. 
Leaves the flesh firm and gives a 
natural healthy glow to the skin. 
Makes you feel years younger. 

A FEW MINUTES A DAY 
ROLLS FAT AWAY 

Take off many inches from the 
spots where you want to reduce 
most. ROLLETTE is an effective, 
scientific principle for reducing 
which is receiving the approval of 
physicians everywhere. Just send 
name and address for C^ICK? 
Trial Offer— Today F ETC 11 
Rollette Co., 3826 N. Ashland Av. 
Dept. 401. Chicago, Illinois 

80 




LOSES 23 Lbs 



"By usina 

Rolleuelhave 

lost 23 lbs. the 

first month." 

Anne Reilly, 

Milwaukee;. 
Wise. 



with the wail: "Wake up, Marty. I want 
to rehearse that number again. I've got 
a new idea." And the weary accompan- 
ist rises to pound the keyboards, half- 
asleep. 

To work with Jolson you must live 
with him. He actually fears loneliness. 
When he eats, three or four satellites 
must sit at his table. When he goes to 
the ball park he buys a flock of tickets. 
Martin Freed gets about $250 a week, 
but his working hours are manifold. He 
eats, sleeps, laughs and cries with his mas- 
ter. Only when Ruby comes to town are 
Martin's hours his own. 

On one of these Keeler excursions, Mar- 
tin returned to the hotel quite late, only 
to discover the entire suite lit up and 
Jolson pacing the floor nervously. He 
barked at the pianist: "You know 1 can't 
sleep until you come home!" 

One time the excitable singer threat- 
ened to walk off the show. It was Victor 
Young who held him back. 

Al had just unloosed a scathing attack 
on the heads of some supervisors. He 
came out of their sanctum breathing 
hard. Victor, who had been waiting out- 
side, caught up with him, and gave him a 
resounding slap on the back. 

"Al, hold on to yourself," Victor 
pleaded, tugging at the enraged man's 
coatsleeve. "Why let your blood pressure 
skyrocket over a radio program? Go 
home and forget it." 

The reminder of a rising blood pressure 
quieted Al. It is the one thing he Tears. 
After he left Al, Victor trailed Ruby in 
the midst of a shopping tour. 

"Ruby," Victor implored, "go home 
now and see that Al doesn't get near the 
phone. He might start a rumpus again." 

Al never forgot Victor's cooperation. 
Before Al Jolson and Victor Young 
found each other under all this veneer 
and rumors of cheap jealousy, Al would 
announce his musical director's name 
last on the program. Now, if you listen 
carefully, you will find it far ahead of all 
those glittering guest stars that appear on 
this impressive program. 

Al Jolson like most show people can 
probably count his true friends on his 
ten fingers. Victor Young is one of them. 
If Al gets nothing more out of the ether 
waves than a fabulous salary, he knows 
he has found a real friend. 

That's a radio story seldom printed. 



The Great Radio Murder 



Mystery 



{Continued from page 41) 

who would, and often did, resort to any 
subterfuge in order to secure a scoop. 

"And that is what the Gail Richard 
murder was— this reporter's greatest 
scoop. But with discovery hourly becom- 
ing more certain, he realized that he still 
had one more scoop — confession! There 
was no longer anything to live for — his 
health was failing and he had lost his 
job. 

"Listeners, 1 have given you a descrip- 
tion of both crimes. I have told you the 
motives. Now I name the murderer! He 
is — your own — Flash Hanlon!" 

The three in the lounge had remained 
frozen, unable to move. Now, with a 
frenzied roar, Thomas bounded to the 
stairs. 

"Don't let that man get away!" he bel- 
lowed as he flung his bulky figure toward 
the broadcast room. 

But there was no need to bother. As 
soon as Flash had finished his last broad- 



END 
CORN 
PAIN 



IN ONE 
MINUTE! 



Relieve Callouses and Bunions 

Dr. Scholl's Zino-pads — the safe, sure treat- 
ment of many uses — instantly relieve pain of 
these foot troubles; soothe and heal irritation; 
stop shoe friction and pressure; prevent sore 
toes and blisters. Quickly and safely remove 
corns or callouses. Try them! Two kinds — 
Standard White 25^; New DeLuxe flesh color 
3 5 (if. At all drug, shoe and department stores. 

DfScholls lino pads 






PSORIASIS, ECZEMA, ITCH, ACNE, RINGWORM. 

Distresses from these disorders now QUICKLY relieved with 
PSORACINE, a remarkable preparation used by thousands. 
Many wonderful reports from everywhere. FREE IN- 

FORMATION ON SKIN DISORDERS. WRITE 
ILLINOIS MEDICAL PRODUCTS, 208 N. Wells, D-61, Chicago. 



t m» umam 

LEARN AT HOME NEW EASY WAY. Pro- 
fessional Stage Method. Surprise and en- 

rtain your friends. Be popular, earn extra money, de- 
lop hidden talent. No music or experience needed. Be- 
nin dancing first day. Beginner's fundamentals and com- 
plete Professional Tap Dance included. Equal to $40 in- 
struction. Easy way to reduce or build up figure. For ladies 
or men. Send only $3.75 money order for Complete 17-Les- 
Ron Course. Or send no monev (if in U. S.) and pay postman 
$3.98 on delivery. No more to pay. Try 5 days. If not delight- 
ed, money refunded. Limbering exercises FREE if you 
enroll now. THORNTON DANCE STUOIOS 
827 Irving Fark Blvd., Suite 140, Chicago, III. 



No Joke To Be Deaf 

—Every deaE person knows that— 

Mr. Way made himself hear his watch tick after 

Joeing deaf for twenty-five years, with his Arti- 

'#SS& f ficial Ear Drums. He wore them day and night. 

™ f ? They stopped his head tfw-******. ^-^^ 

noises. Theyare invisible 

andcomfortabIe.no wires 

or batteries. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money back. 

Write for TRUE STORY.Also A - ,-- ,„,r.„n™« 

booklet on Deafness. Artificial Ear Drum 

THE WAY COMPANY 

719 Hofmann Bldg. Detroit, Michigai 

Now Only 

vox 

AFTER 

10 Day 
FREE Trial 

No Money Down 

Positively the greatest bargain over offered. A genuine full sized 
S100 office model Underwood No. 5 for only S39.90 (cash) or 
on easy terms. Has up-to-date improvements including stand- 
ard 4-row keyboard, backspacer, automatic ribbon reverse, 
shiftlock key, 2-coIor ribbon, etc. The perfect all purpose 
typewriter. Completely rebuilt and FULLY GUARANTEED. 
Lowest Terms — 10c a Day 





GUARANTEED 



Learn Touch Typewriting 

Complete (Home Study) 
Course of the Famous Van 
Sant Speed Typewriting 
System — fully illustrated, 
easily learned, given dur- 
ing this offer. 



Money-Back Guarantee 

Send coupon for 10-day Trial 
— if you decide to keep it pay 
only S3.00 a month until S44.90 
(term price) is paid. Limited 
offer — act at once. 



INTERNATIONAL TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

231 West Monroe St., Chicago, III., Dept. 1103 

Send Underwood No. 5 (F. O. B. Chicago) at once for 10-daya 
trial. If I am not perfectly satisfied I can return it express col- 
lect. If I keep it I will pay $3.00 a month until I have paid $44.90 
(term price) in full. 



Narr 



.Age. 



RADIO MIRROR 



cast, he had opened the box of tablets 
given to him by Dr. Germain. When 
Thomas burst into the room, Flash I lan- 
lon was dead. 

TIIH Baltimore and Ohio's crack ex- 
press rushed across the flatlands of the 
Mississippi Valley toward St. Louis. Un- 
til her gaze touched the dusky horizon, 
Sidney could see nothing but green rolling 
fields. Here were no skyscrapers to shut 
out the sun, no thundering subways to 
shatter the quiet of the land. Yet an in- 
definable longing suddenly assailed her. 
She turned to Lee, sitting beside her in 
their compartment. 

"It's funny, but I think I'm already a 
little homesick for New York." 

"We'll be back soon enough. You're on 
your honeymoon now. That's all you 
have to remember." 

"And to think," Sidney reflected, "that 
we really owe this all to Flash. What a 
funny mixture of ruthless self-importance 
and impulsive generosity he was." Her 
eyes returned to the horizon. Life for 
one was over, for two others, it was just 
beginning. 

The. End 



Cooking a La Madame 



Sylvia 



(Continued from page 48) 

is strawberries, cherries, raspberries, blue- 
berries and currants. 

"I use this fruit in many ways," Mad- 
ame Sylvia said. " As is,' for dessert 
served with cake, it is delicious. I also 
use the fruit, with the juice poured off, 
as filling for layer cake, saving this juice 
to serve as a cordial with coffee." 

As you will judge from the picture of 
her in her kitchen, Madame Sylvia is a 
vegetable enthusiast. "You should see us 
when we come home on Sunday nights, 
she said. "Every week-end we spend in 
the country, driving from town to town, 
sometimes stopping to fish, and we al- 
ways come back with our car loaded with 
vegetables we have bought along the road. 
Last time it took two boys to carry 
our stuff upstairs. 

"I am very particular about the way 
vegetables are cooked. I use very 
little water, just enough to keep them 
from burning, and only clear water — 
never salted. And I always save the 
water the vegetables are cooked in — it 
makes such a delicious consomme and I 
cannot understand why anyone throws 
it away. If we are having boiled celery 
for dinner, I pour off the cooking water, 
then keep it on the flame while I beat an 
egg yolk with celery salt and white 
pepper. (The proportion is half a beaten 
egg yolk to one cupful of consomme.) 
Into each consomme cup I put the egg, 
then pour the boiling celery water onto 
it, a little at a time, stirring — not beating 
— as I pour. This keeps the egg from 
curdling. If there is only a little water 
left after cooking vegetables I save it 
until I have more after cooking another 
vegetable, then combine the two. Water 
that carrots have been cooked in is rather 
sweet, and I add lemon juice to it." 

There is also a grand cabbage soup 
with meat balls for which Madame 
Sylvia is famous and I'll be glad to send 
you the recipe, if you will send me a 
stamped, self-addressed envelope. Ad- 
dress Mrs. Margaret Simpson, Radio 
Mirror, 1926 Broadway, New York N Y 




Millions use Medicated Cream 
to Promote Rapid Healing 

. . . to relieve irritation and reduce pores 



YOU CAN dress smartly— you can have 
lovely features— but if your skin is marred 
by Large Pores, Blackheads or Pimples, much 
of your charm is lost. 

Today, millions of women use a famous 
medicated cream as an aid to quick healing 
—to improve their complexion by eliminat- 
ing blackheads and reducing enlarged pores. 
That cream is Noxzema Skin Cream. 

Prescribed by Doctors 

Noxzema was first prescribed by doctors to 



Wonderful for 
Chapped Hands, too 




Relieve them overnight 
with this famous cream 

12,000,000 jars sold yearly 

Make this convincing overnight test. Apply 
Noxzema on one hand tonight. In the morning 
note how soothed it feels — how much soft- 
er, smoother, whitet that hand is! Noxzema 
relieves hands overnight. 



relieve itching Eczema, and for Burns, Scalds, 
Chafing and other skin irritations. Today 
over 12,000,000 jars are used throughout the 
United States, in Canada and other countries! 

If your skin is Rough and Chapped— if you 
have Large Pores or Blackheads— if you have 
Pimples resulting from dust, face powder 
or other external causes— then by all means 
get a small inexpensive jar of Noxzema. Use 
it and see how wonderful it is. 

Noxzema is not a salve— but a dainty, 
snow-white, medicated vanishing cream. It's 
so soothing, clean and easy to use. 

HOW TO USE: Apply Noxzema every 
night after all make-up has been removed. 
Wash off in the morning with warm water, 
followed by cold water or ice. Apply a little 
Noxzema again before 
you powder as a pro- 
tective powder base. 
Use Noxzema until 
skin condition is en- 
tirely relieved. 




SPECIAL TRIAL OFFER 

Noxzema is sold at almost all drug and 
department stores. If your dealer can't 
supply you, send only 15^ for a generous 
25)^ trial jar— enough to bring real comfort 
and a big improvement in your skin. Send 
name and address to Noxzema Chemical 
Company, Dept. 1011, Baltimore, Md. 



81 



RADIO MIRROR 




ZOMEMBRE Oi/T 



~tfme 



YOU'RE 

WITH n 

PI D 11 E E RS 111 RADIO 




parried . . . 

and 40! 



Do you need extra money? Is your husband 
out of work? Or are you forced to face the 
world alone, with children to support? 

Thousands of graduates and students of 
the Chicago School of Nursing are numbered 
among those approaching or past the 40 
mark. Many also are married, with home 
duties. They have learned at home and in 
their spare time the dignified, well-paid pro- 
fession of Nursing. Many earned a consid- 
erable sum every week while studying. 

Course endorsed by physicians. Est. 35 
years. One graduate has charge of a 10-bed 
hospital. Another saved $400 while learning. 
Equipment included. Men and women 18 to 
60. High school not required. Easy tuition 
payments. Write us now and learn how you 
can prepare yourself to earn $25 to $35 a 
week as a C. S. N. -trained practical nurse. 



CHICAGO SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Dept. 1811, 26 N. Ashland Boulevard, Chicago, III. 
Please send free booklet and 32 sample lesson 
pages. 






.Aoe~ 



Secrets of a Society 
Hostess 

{Continued from page 43) 

entertained at all knows what her draw- 
ing room looks like after a party. When 
we had said goodbye to the last guest I 
returned to that littered room and faced 
my husband. He swept the room with 
a magnificent gesture. "It's gone. Every- 
thing is gone." 

"Then there's nothing left for us to do 
but to start over again, is there?" I 
asked. And we began making our plans, 
seeing what we could save from the 
wreckage. 

That certainly was the most difficult 
"party" situation I've ever had to master. 

It has been my experience that musi- 
cians love a good time better than any 
one. When I had Toscanini to dinner I al- 
ways tried to include on the menu some 
Italian dish he loved. One of his favorite 
dishes was gnocchi alia potate, which, as 
near as I can describe it, is like a light 
cone-shaped dumpling and served with 
a wonderful sauce. Lasagne was another 
favorite. That is a paste rather like 
spaghetti which is stuffed with meat or 
green spinach. Then I often had polio 
alia Cacciatora, chicken with a special olive 
oil and tomato sauce. 

That is truly one of the real secrets of 
being a good hostess — having what your 
guest of honor likes most to eat. It flat- 
ters and pleases him and is a charming 
courtesy on your part. 

I'VE had many different types of par- 
ties, as I've explained — from the inti- 
mate conversational affairs to the most 
elaborate and enormous receptions. But 
certainly the most spectacular of all were 
the various circus balls. 

Each year the New York Times and 
the Herald-Tribune devoted a page of 
their rotogravure section to photographs 
of my guests and before these elaborate 
parties many social lights entertained 
with smaller dinners, inviting those who 
were coming to the "circus" later. 

One of the secrets of good entertaining 
is the impromptu spirit and the only rea- 
son I was able to manage several differ- 
ent homes, a career, a husband and a 
daughter was because I never fussed over 
parties. But certainly the circus balls 
were an exception, and in this connection 
I can pass on another party tip to you. 
When you've achieved the reputation for 
having cosy, intimate affairs which gather 
together interesting people who talk well 
and are able to do things, then it is great 
fun and boosts your reputation as a host- 
ess to suddenly cut loose with a stunning 
and spectacular affair. 

So with the feeling that by describing 
one of my famous circus balls I may give 
you a few ideas which you can use in a 
less elaborate way I am going to tell you 
about these parties. 

At the time, we were living in an enor- 
mous apartment on Madison Avenue. 
Leading into the ball room was a corridor 
about a hundred feet long. Bedrooms and 
sitting rooms opened out of this corridor 
and it was this very arrangement which 
gave me the idea of the circus party. 

For days I was on hand instructing 
workmen in the rearrangement of my 
home. The rooms leading off the corri- 
dor were transformed into side show 
booths. Every piece of furniture was 
taken out and the ball room was trans- 
formed into a circus tent with bleacher 
seats extending to the ceiling. Naturally 
my walls were not so high as a tent but 
to give the idea of space I had minia- 



Wife Wins Fight 

with 

Kidney 

Acids 




Sleeps Fine, Feels 10 
Years Younger — Uses 
Guaranteed Cystex Test 

Thousands of women and men sufferers from 
poorly functioning Kidneys and Bladder have 
discovered a simple, easy way to sleep fine 
and feel years younger by combating Getting 
Up Nights, Backache, Leg Pains, Nervousness, 
Stiffness, Neuralgia, Burning, Smarting and 
Acidity due to poor Kidney and Bladder func- 
tions, by using a Doctor's prescription called 
Cystex (Siss-tex). Works fast, safe, and sure. 
In 48 hours it must bring new vitality, and is 
guaranteed to do the work in one week or 
money back on return of empty package. 
Cystex costs only 3c a dose at druggists. 
The guarantee protects you. 

WHY DON'T YOU WRITE? 

Writing short stories, articles on business, hobbies, travels, 
sports, etc., will enable you to earn extra money. In your 
own home, on your own time, the New York Copy-Desk 
Method teaches you how to write — the way newspaper men 
learn, by writing. We have prepared a unique "Writing 
Aptitude Test" which tells whether you possess the funda- 
mental qualities essential to successful writing. You'll 
enjoy this test. Write for it, without cost or obligation. 

NEWSPAPER INSTITUTE OF AMERICA 

Suite 527, One Park Avenue New York, N. Y. 



the 



PURE VNITfED COPPER 



CHORE GIRL 

jTANTLY CLEANS P0TT«PCNS 
^ \ No More Kitch en Drudgery! 



~ ~ Patented parallel outer layers provide- 

' Double the Wear, where the Wear comet 



YDUR FflK CHAnGCD 



ina new beauty! Th«y can be yours. 
Dr. Stotter Cerad. of University of 
Vienna) reconstructs faces by fa- 
mous Vienna Polyclinic methods. 
Unshapely Noses, Protruding Ears, 
Large Lips, Wrinkles, Siena of Age, 
etc.. are all quickly corrected. Low 
cost. Writ* or coil for Free Booklet 
"Facial Reconstruction," (mailed in 
nlain wrapper.) 

Dr. Stotter, SO East 42nd St., 
Dent. 8-L. New York 




NEW INVENTION DRIVES 
AWAY BATHROOM ODORS 



Dispel Bathroom Odors *aey inexpensive way, Puro 
Bowl-Itizer overcomes odors and replaces them with 
flower-like fragrance. Hangs out of Bight inside toilet. 
Guaranteed as advertised in Good Housekeeping 
Magazine. 

AGENTS MAKE UP TO $B DAILY 
Every home needs Bowl-Itizer. One of 12 fust-selling 
home necessities. Write today for details and FULL- 
SIZE Free Sample. 

THE PURO CO., Inc. 3107 pine e st.\ st. Louis mo. 




V OI C E 



100% Improvement Guaranteed 

I We build, strengthen the vocal organs — 

I not with winging lesions — bnt by f undamentally 

eound and scientifically correct nilent exerciser.. 

and absolutely guarantee to improve any singing 

or speaking voice at leaet 100% . . . Write for 

wonderful voice book— sent free, bnt enclose 80 

for part postage. Learn WHY yon can now have 

I the voice yon want. No literature sent to any- 

I one under 17 unless signed by parent, 

PERFECT VOICE INSTITUTE, Studio 79-18 

64 E. Lake St., Chicago 



JMesrCRAY HAIR 

REMEDY IS MADE AT HONE 

VOU can now make at home a bet- 
ter gray hair remedy than you can 
buy, by following this simple recipe: 
To half pint of water add one ounce 
bay rum, a small box of Barbo Com- 
pound and one-fourth ounce of glyc- 
erine. Any druggist can put this up 
or you can mix it yourself at very 
little cost. Apply to the hair twice 
a week until the desired shade is ob- 
tained. Barbo imparts color to 
streaked, faded or gray hair, makes 
it soft and glossy and takes years off 
your looks. It will not color the scalp, is not 
sticky or greasy and does not rub off. Do not be 
handicapped by gray hair now when it is so econom- 
ical and easy to get rid of it in your own home. 




82 



RADIO MIRROR 



ture trapezes hung from the ceiling and 
dummy figures in acrobatic costumes 
swinging from them. 

The invitations were novel. I sent out 
hand bills in flaming colors and printed in 
bold type announcing that Bill and Co- 
bina Wright were presenting the greatest 
show on earth. I included regular circus 
tickets the stub of which was the "R. S. 
V. P." 

There were five hundred on my guest 
list and they all came. What's more they 
all came in circus costumes to which, I 
was pleased to see. they had given a great 
deal of thought. I shall never forget Bea- 
trice Lillie and Noel Coward dressed as 
acrobats with enormous waxed moustaches. 

At the rear of my bar I had an oyster 
bar where hundreds of the finest oysters 
were dispensed. I served hot dogs, pea- 
nuts, ice cream cones and soda pop (the 
soda pop was actually champagne with 
straws in the bottles) and enlisted the 
help of the guests — a task they loved — in 
dispensing them. Walter Damrosch was 
my peanut vendor. lie wore a chef's cap 
and a long black beard and was one of 
the sensations of the evening. 

1 had real ponies and trained dogs and 
clowns, funny mirrors that make one look 
fat and thin, gypsy fortune tellers, all 
sorts of freaks, and a real calliope. 

ON the programs I announced acts 
from various of my guests. I did this 
simply for a laugh. 1 wrote that there 
would be an "exhibition of equestrian 
equilibrism" by Beatrice Lillie, Dorothy 
Caruso, Michael Strange (at that time 
Mrs. John Barrymore) Alma Cluck, Anna 
Case, Jane Cowl, Ethel Barrymore, Gilda 
Grey, Nazimova and Laurette Taylor. It 
never occurred to me that these celebri- 
ties would put on the exhibition but they 
actually did in the middle of the ring. 

Who else was there? Who else was not 
there! To name but a very few^Prince 
and Princess Serge Obolensky, Count and 
Countess Jean de Segonzac, Prince and 
Princess Francesco Rospigliosi, Prince 
Dmitri, Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt, the 
Duchess of Roxburghe, Mrs. William 
Randolph Hearst, Elsie de Wolfe, the 
Count and Countess Villa, Mr. and Mrs. 
Goadby Loew, Mr. and Mrs. Jay Gould, 
Elsa Maxwell, Lillian Gish and others. 

There was dancing in the circus ring 
and seeing those ill assorted couples was 
a treat in itself. There was always a prize 
for the most beautiful costume, most 
comic costume and most original couple. 

Yes, I spent literally thousands of 
dollars on these entertainments, but a 
grand costume party can be given for 
ten dollars, or if you're on an extremely 
limited budget, a group can get together 
and give a party "dutch" with everyone 
contributing a certain amount The idea 
of good entertaining, you see, is not to 
see how much money you can spend but 
to have fun ! 

And speaking of fun reminds me of 
Jascha Heifetz, the greatest practical 
joker I have ever known. Once at my 
home in Palm Beach he asked if he might 
dress up and play the role of butler for a 
very smart dinner party 1 was giving. I 
thought that would be great fun. 

He wore the butler's uniform, put on a 
very fine moustache and combed his hair 
differently. Before we went in to dinner 
I seriously explained to my guests that I 
had a new butler and I hoped that if he 
made a mistake they would forgive him 
and me. 

// he made a mistake. Great heavens! 

What an exciting dinner party this 
will be! Read the laughable account of 
it and more of Cobina Wright's fascinat- 
ing revelations in the December RADIO 
MIRROR out October 25th. 



C H E R A M Y 

Abrli Sko 



W€r\s 



PERFUME OF YOUTH 




ON A BUDGET 



YOUTH shall not be denied loveliness, says April 
Showers . . . and forthwith presents the most ex- 
quisite toiletries that ever fitted a young budget! Face 
powder . . . a sheer veil of scented mist. Talc for a re- 
freshing body-bath. Eau de cologne for a glamorous 
rub-down. And a perfume created by one of the 
world's greatest perfumers to give you a fragrance 
that is young and gay and in supreme good taste. 

83 



PRICE LIST 

April Showers 

Eau de Cologne 28|!,55(!,$1 
Face Powder. . . 28<i and 55(i 

Talc 28f! and 55(i 

Perfume 

purse sizes 28(! and 50t 

Dusting Powder 

85(! and Sl-25 

Rouge, Lipstick, Skin Lotion, 
Bath Salts, etc., from 28i to 
85i. At stores everywhere. 



rnrr ^^^w^ 

rKLL^""""" ERN5 



* SEE OFFER BELOW 



EASY TO LAY 

OUT TOO... 

AND PUFFS 

UP LIKE NEW 

AFTER 

WASHING ! 




\ZuiueU Amazed In/ 
NEW KINDof BATTING 

Handles Like Cloth ...No Lint 

No Stretching . . . No Lumps! 

"Y^HY spend hours upon hours making a quilt only to 
*« have it get lumpy and old-looking after a few wash- 
ings? Mountain Mist Quilt Cotton actually improves with 
washing; puffs up — pads out every quilted detail. So easy 
to lay out, too; handles like cloth. One big sheet of amaz- 
ingly uniform thickness. 81 x 96 inches, no stretching, no 
tears or thin spots. Unique "Glazene" covering prevents 
sticking, picking, or lint, and makes fine, 
^^D close stitching easy. 

*/*£# QUIL 

The Quilt Pattern Book shows 
29 famous quilts each pic- 
tured full length on bed, with 
colors. Send 10c for pattern 
book. Then tell us your choice 
and we will send one complete 
gattem and instructions 
FREE I Thousands of women regularly pay 35c each for 
these patterns. Write The Stearns & Foster 
Co., Dept.R160,Lockland, Cincinnati, Ohio. 




MOUNT, 




Reg. U. S. Patent Office 



COTTON 



LITTLE BLUE BOOKS 



Send postcard for our free catalogue. Thou- 
sands of bargains. Address: LITTLE BLUE 
BOOK CO., Catalogue Dept., Desk 467, 
Girard, Kansas. 



WHAT? 

only 1 per week to 
OWN A CORONA? 

Yes — it's a fact! Our new Finance 
Plan makes it just that easy. Brand- 
new up-to-date portables, including 
carrying case. 



Do this. First send cou- 
pon for descriptive book- 
let. Then go to a dealer's 
and see which one of the 
five CORONA models you 
like best. Try it . . . free. 
Then buy it, on these 
amazingly liberal terms. 
Here's the coupon. 




CORONA 
STANDARD 



MAIL COUPON TODAY 

L C Smith & Corona Typewriters, Desk 11 
181 Almond St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Please send Corona booklet, also tell me where I can 
arrange free trial. 



Name . 
Street. 
City... 



RADIO M IRROR 

Beauty Is in Your Hands 

{Continued from page 40) 

For that filing of the nails which comes 
first in any good manicure, Niela prefers 
an emery board, rather than a metal file — 
a procedure which is also approved by the 
experts. It's important to remember that 
filing should always be done from the 
outer edge of the nail to the tip; this 
helps prevent the nail from cracking and 
hangnails from forming, and also pro- 
duces a finer point or oval. Use the 
coarse side of your emery board for ob- 
taining the shape you want, and the fine 
side to smooth the edges perfectly. 

To your usual manicure accessories, 
add a soft nail brush and a bowl slightly 
larger than a bouillon cup. Fill this with 
warm, soapy water before you start your 
manicure, letting the nail brush soak 
while you file your nails. Now dip your 
fingertips in the bowl and let them soak, 
too, for a little while. Then scrub around 
your nails, gently but firmly, with the 
soapy brush and dry your hands (with- 
out rinsing) on a soft linen towel. 

You've all heard by now that you 
mustn't, under any circumstances, cut 
your cuticule, so I won't warn you again! 
Use cuticle remover and either an orange 
stick wrapped in cotton or one of the 
special manicure sticks with a tiny brush 
in the tip. If you use an ordinary orange 
stick, dip it into the liquid before wrap- 
ping the tip with cotton and the cotton 
will adhere more firmly. Apply the cu- 
ticle remover to the base of the nail and 
push back the cuticle as much as possi- 
ble, to reveal the delicate half-moon be- 
neath. Do this ever so gently, because it's 
pressing too hard on this delicate section 
which often produces those ugly white 
specks in your, nails. Just before you fin- 
ish, run the orange stick under the nail 
tip for extra cleanliness and dry the nails 
with clean cotton. 

"MJOW'S the time to rinse your fingers in 
^-^ clear water and remove your old nail 
polish with the polish remover designed 
for use with your favorite polish; the oily 
removers are being recommended these 
days by nearly every company. Finish 
off with another good, soapy scrub. If 
you want to stimulate the circulation, 
buff your nails, but do it only in one di- 
rection, otherwise the friction produces 
too much heat. 

At last we've come to that all-important 
subject of polish, and there are certainly 
enough beautiful shades to satisfy any 
taste today. It's particularly smart nowa- 
days to have your nail polish match your 
lipstick, and one company has even put 
out these two cosmetics in matching 
shades. Just as you have two or three 
lipsticks for day and evening wear and 
two or three nail polishes to go with your 
varicolored costumes, you'll want to have 
two or three sets of matching polish and 
lip rouge to be in perfect harmony with 
your wardrobe. This isn't just putting on 
swank — it's common sense, if you want an 
artistic ensemble. 

For special occasions or exotic gowns, 
there are some unusual shades in metal 
and jewel tones. You can achieve indi- 
viduality with these if you use them in 
combination, a rich colorful coat with a 
pearly or metallic one. I'll be glad to send 
you charts so that you can work out com- 
binations for your particular need. 

In any event, you will always want to 
use two coats of polish for greater dura- 
bility and lustre. Apply them carefully, 
outlining the half-moon with the brush 
and removing the polish from the white 
tip with a bit of cleansing tissue (unless 
you want to enamel your nail solidly from 



She Got MOP 

for a Half Dollar 



\p will pay CAS H /ert 

UjU) COINS. BIUS WsIAM PSI 

I POST YOURSELF! It pays!/ 

I paid $400.00 to Mrs. Dowty (= 
of Texas, forone Half Dollar; \ 
I J.D.Martin of Virginia $200.00. 
for a single Copper Cent. Mr. ' 
Manning of New York, $2,600.00 for / 
one Silver Dollar. Mrs. G. F. Adams, Ohio, \ 
received $740. 00 for a few old coins. I will pay big prices 
forallkindsof oldcoins, medals, bills and stamps. 
I WILL PAY $100.00 FOR A DIME! 

1S94 S. Mint; $60.00 tor 1913 Liberty Head Nickel toot Buffalo) r 
and hundreds of other amazing prices ror coins. Send 4c forV 
Large Illustrated Coin Folder and further particulars. It may 
mean much profit to you . Write today to j^ „ 

8 MAX MEHL, 356 Mehl Bldg., FORT WORTH, TEXAS 

(Largest Rare Coin Establishment in U. S.) 



UTTER YOUR 5ULE5 



NEW $o-lp PLASTIC RUBBER ! 

Dries tough over-night! Out-wears lent h 

Waterproof! Flexible! Non-skid '. Guaranteed! Fix ai 
top, cuts in tires, etc. Take this ad to any Hardware 
Or 10c Store. ASH FOR SO-LO PLASTIC RUBBER. J 

*ES™S HAWAIIAN GUITAR 




the Hawaiian way. Surprise and enter- 
tain your friends. Amazing new sim- 
ple method makes learning to play from 
REGULAR PIANO MUSIC as fas- 
cinating as a game. Shows you in pictures 
how to do it. Previous musical training and 
talent unnecessary. Earn while learning by new 
plan. You pav for the lessons juet as they are 
received. Write today for free information. A 
postcard will do. (Fine guitars supplied $5 up.) 

25c ACADEMY OF HAWAIIAN MUSIC 

PEH Dept. 19-A 

lesson 6th Fl„ Lyon & Healy Bid;., Chicago 



WRITE FOR MONEY 





FREE MAGAZINE 

Every year thousands of men and women 

who never dreamed of writing, break into 

print sb money-making authors of etories, articles. 

books, poetry, etc. The market for good material, 

is unlimited. Send to-day for your FREE COPY 

of "Writer's Review" — the magazine published 

to help you learn to write for profit, and help 

you Bell what you write at best prices. Act now. 

U/DITTDQ DFUIFW 1202 Jackson 
fTKIItlfO KtViXYV Cincinnati, Ohio, 



Follow This Man 

Secret Service Operator No. 88 is on 
the job I Running down Counterfeit 
Gang. Tell-Ule fingerprints in mur- 
dered girl's room. Thrill, Mystery. 
__ The Confidential Report* 

|?rAA of Operator No. $8 made 
JT 1 CC ^ hi* chief. Write for it. 
Earn a Regular Monthly Salary 
YOU can become aFinrer Print Ex- 

?ert at home, in spare fcimt. Write 
or details if 17 or over. 

Institute of Applied Science 

1920 Sunnyside Ave. 

Dept. 79-18 Chicago, 111: 



ASTHMATIC 

SUFFERERS— For QUICK RELIEF smoke 
Dr. J. H. Guild's Green Mountain Asthmatic 
Compound. Its pleasant smoke vapor quickly 
soothes and relieves paroxysms of Asthma. 
Send today for FREE TRIAL package of 6 
cigarettes, the popular form of this compound. 
Smoke and inhale just as you would ordinary 
cigarettes. Standard remedy at all druggists. 
Cigarettes, 50c for 24. Powder form, 25 cents 
and $1.00. The J. H. Guild Co., Dept. EK17 
Rupert, Vt. 

nD Pllll Il'O GREEN MOUNTAIN 
Ull. UUILU ASTHMATIC COMPOUND 

IMPORTANT 

RADIO CHANGE! 

TRUE STORY 

COURT OF HUMAN 
RELATIONS 

IS NOW ON 

B. C. RED 

NETWORK 

EVERY 
FRIDAY NIGHT 

SEE LOCAL PAPER FOR 
NEAREST STATION AND TIME 



N. 



84 



RADIO MIRROR 



half-moon to tip, in the latest Hollywood 
style, as Ethel Merman does). If you ac- 
cidentally brush a little polish on the skin, 
remove it with" the point of an orange 
stick before it hardens. And be sure the 
first coat is dry before starting the 
second. 

What's that? I've forgotten the cuticle 
oil or cream? No, this is the time to use 
it, after everything else is finished. If you 
use it before applying your polish, the 
enamel is more likely to chip. On the 
other hand, if you use it afterwards, you 
get extra benefit from it because the oil 
or cream is left on the skin longer and 
gets a better chance to penetrate. When 
your nails get too dry or brittle (Niela 
has to watch this because of her piano 
playing, and those of us who use the type- 
writer should, too), massage a little cu- 
ticle cream or oil into them every night. 
There are even little rubber tips which 
can be placed on your fingers to retain 
the oil and keep the fingers silky and 
tapering (I'll write you more about this, 
if you're interested). 

You can finish up with the massage 
Niela mentions, making the hands smooth 
and supple. One hand cream in particu- 
lar, which I should like to tell you about, 
if you will write me, refines the pores 
beautifully and leaves the skin so satiny. 

There are so many types of nail white 
that I shall leave you to choose your own; 
full directions for use accompany each 
type. But have you tried carrying one of 
the nail-white sticks in your purse? It 
freshens up your manicure delightfully 
when you haven't time to go home be- 
tween your work at the office and your 
dinner date. It's particularly helpful if you 
handle carbon paper or similar smudgy 
materials. 

THOSE outdoor days I spoke of aren't 
hard on the hands alone. They dry and 
roughen the skin generally, but Niela has 
a remedy for that, too. It was entirely 
new to me and so simple that I wondered 
why no one had thought of it before! 
She learned of it while she was singing 
at the Hollywood Dinner Club in Galves- 
ton — a new way' to combat the influences 
of the Texas sun, and vacation suns gen- 
erally. But I've more than used up my 
space this month, so I'll have to send it 
to you by mail. Just drop me a stamped, 
self-addressed envelope with your query 
and I'll tell you of Niela Goodelle's treat- 
ment for dry skin, as well as the simple 
diet she occasionally uses to clear her 
skin. 

Also, I'll be glad to tell you more about 
the manicure preparations mentioned in 
this article — the hand cream, manicure 
stick, rubber caps for the fingers, as well 
as the polishes and removers. Would you 
like a chart to show you what matching 
lipsticks and polishes you should wear 
with different colors? Or a chart to show 
you how to combine such fascinating tints 
as platinum and bronze for an unusually 
effective polish? Just write Joyce Ander- 
son, Radio Mirror, 1926 Broadway, New 
York City. Don't forget your stamped, 
self-addressed envelope! 



NOTICE! 

THE LUCKY WINNER 

of the Irene Rich Dress, will be an- 
nounced in next month's issue of 
Radio Mirror — on sale October 
25th 



Get Relief From 
These Troubles^/I^w 







Thousands get 
Amazing Results with Yeast Foam Tablets — a Dry 
Yeast — the Kind Science finds so Abundant in 
Health-Building Vitamin B 



IF YOU suffer from any of the common 
troubles listed above, let Yeast Foam 
Tablets help you correct the condition 
now. These pleasant, pasteurized yeast 
tablets have done wonders for thousands 
of men and women. 

Doctors all over the world recommend 
yeast for combating skin troubles and 
faulty elimination. In these easy-to-eat 
tablets you get this corrective food in the 
form science now knows is so rich as a 
source of Vitamin B. 

Tests reveal that from dry yeast the 
system quickly absorbs the precious 
element that gives tone to the digestive 
system, stimulates intestinal action and 
helps to free the body of poisons. 
No wonder users report such amazing re- 
sults ! 

At a well known clinic, 83% of the 
patients with constipation, who were given 
Yeast Foam Tablets, reported marked 
improvement within two weeks. Before 
starting to eat this dry yeast, some of 
these patients had used laxatives almost 
continuously. 



Start now to eat Yeast Foam Tablets 
regularly. See how fast this dry yeast helps 
you to look better and feel better. Within 
a short time your whole digestive system 
should return to healthy function. You 
should no longer need to take harsh cathar- 
tics. You should have more strength and 
energy. Ugly pimples and other skin blem- 
ishes caused by a sluggish system should 
disappear. 

Ask your druggist for Yeast Foam 
Tablets today. The 10-day bottle costs 
only 50c. Refuse all substitutes. 



FREE ! This beautiful tilted mirror. Gives 
perfect close-up. Leaves 
both hands free to put on 
make-up. Amazingly con- 
venient. Sent free for an 
empty Yeast Foam Tablet 
carton. Use the coupon. 

EG-ll-35 

NORTHWESTERN YEAST CO. | 

1750 N. Ashland Ave., Chicago, 111. | 

I enclose empty Yeast Foam Tablet carton. I 

Please send me the handy tilted make-up mirror. I 




Name 

Address . 
City 



State. 



. I 
I 

- I 
I 



RADIO MI RROR 




"What's the use of denying it, every 
young man wants to get married! The 
thing that usually holds him back is 
— money. I played the hunch that 
more training meant more money. I 
was right! That coupon I mailed to 
the International Correspondence 
Schools at Scranton really opened the 
world of •romance to me. I recom- 
mend it to any other young man who 
(wants his dream to come true." 



INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS 



Box 2282-C, Scranton, Penna. 

Without cost or obligation, please send me a copy of 
your booklet, "Who Wins and Why," and full particulars 
about the subject before which- I have marked X: 
TECHNICAL AND INDUSTRIAL COURSES 

D Architect 

D Architectural Draftsman 

D Building ^Estimating 

□ Contractor and Builder 
D Structural Draftsman 
D Structural Engineer 
D Electrical Engineer 
D Electric Lighting 
D Telegraph Engineer 
D Telephone Work □ Radio 

□ How to Invent and Patent 
D Mechanical Engineer 
D Mechanical Draftsman 

□ Patternmaker □ Machinist 

□ Reading Shop Blueprints 

□ Heat Treatment of Metals 
D Sheet Metal Worker 
D Welding, Electric and Gas 

□ Civil Engineer □ Toolmaker Q Cotton Manufacturing 

□ Highway Engineer □ Woolen Manufacturing 

□ Surveying and Mapping fj Fruit Growing 

□ Sanitary Engineer □ Poultry Farming 
D Steam Engineer ■ D Agriculture 

_, BUSINESS TRAIN] NG COURSES 

□ Business Management 

□ Industrial Management 

□ Traffic Management 
D Cost Accountant 
D Accountancy and 

C.P.A. Coaching 
D Bookkeeping 

□ Secretarial Work 
D Spanish Q French 

□ Salesmanship 
D Wallpaper Decorating 

Salesmanship 



□ Marine Engineer 

□ Bridge Engineer 
D Bridge & Building Foreman 
Q Gas Engines 

D Diesel Engines 

D Aviation Enginea 

D Automobile Work 

D Plumbing □ Steam Fitting 

□ Heating D Ventilation 

□ Air Conditioning 
D Refrigeration 

D R. R. Locomotives 

□ R. R. Section Foreman 

□ R. R. Signalmen 
D Air Brakes 

□ Chemistry D Pharmacy 

□ Coal Mining 
D Navigation 



□ Advertising 

□ Business Correspondence 

□ Lettering Show Cards 

□ English D Signs 

□ Stenography and Typing 

□ Civil Service 

□ Railway Mail Clerk 

□ Mail Carrier 

□ Grade School Subjects 
D High School Subjects 
D College Preparatory 
D FirBt Year College 

□ Service Station Salesmanship D Illustrating Q Cartooning 

Name Age 



Address 

City State 

Present Position 

// you reside in Canada, send this coupon to the 

International Correspondence Schools Canadian, Limited, 

Montreal. Canada. 




You can earn a 
good steady income in 
spare or full time mak- 
ing delicious, greaeeiess 
do-nuts, with Ringer Electri 
Do-Nut Baker. Delicious! Healthful! Start in 
your own kitchen. No canvassing. Stores, lunch 
rooms, buy all you make. Cash daily. Big profits, 

FREE PLAN \ 

leaf, than 360. Send 



how 



edcd." $25 starts yo 
poet-card today for 



No 



in vent men I 
full information. No 

RINGER DO-NUT CO.. 107 Main St., N.E. Minneapolis, Minn. 



What Do You Want to Say? 

(Continued from page 45) 

main part in a sketch. 

It may cost a good bit of money to 
put on a program even for fifteen min- 
utes, but I think some company would 
be able to put on a program especially for 
the girls that listen to the radio. 

_ Miss Anne Chisum, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

$1.00 PRIZE 

Let's do some of our brass band tootin' 
for those radio artists who emulate 
babies crying, dogs barking, trains puf- 
fing and grinding, birds squawking, eggs 
frying and all those other human sound 
effects. Seems to me that it's more of a 
gift to imitate, successfully, than it is to 
moan a blues song, for instance, and so 
much of the success of radio programs 
depends upon the correct atmosphere, the 
perfection of the back-stage crew. 

Samela Kay Parkhurst, Seattle, Wash. 

$1.00 PRIZE 

I wonder just how many persons realize 
that another chain of stations has come 
into being. For years we've depended on 
those two nation-wide radio organizations, 
National and Columbia, for much of our 
better entertainment. Now we can see 
another group swiftly approaching these 
older chains in its quality of programs — 
the Mutual Broadcasting System. 

From it we hear. such A No. 1 programs 
as Painted Dreams, The Lone Doctor 
and The Lone Ranger. 

A bouquet of flowers and a truck load 
of luck to this new provider of good en- 
tertainment. 

Richard Bessey, Nutley, N. J. 

$1.00 PRIZE 

I am a corresponding fan of radio 
artists. After I listen to a program, if 
it strikes me as being good, I write to 
the artist. 

In very few cases have I received a 
reply. Through investigation I have 
found that very little of such mail is 
ever received by the artists. This mail 
becomes the property of the sponsor and, 
by making it so, the artist in many in- 
stances loses a great many followers. 

I vote that all mail addressed to ar- 
tists should be given to them after in- 
ventory is made. In this way the lis- 
tener and the artist will both get perfect 
satisfaction. 

John C. Berry, Northvale, N. J. 

HONORABLE MENTION 

"What this country needs is fresh, new 
talent. Thanks to radio, we're getting it!" 
— Frank R. Moore, Detroit, Mich. 

"Broadcasters must certainly realize 
that the majority of us are not 'horror 
minded' . . . that occasionally we do 
like to twist the dials without getting 
fiendish laughter, shots, and screams." — 
John W. Dunn, Norman, Okla. 

"Let me say that I am writing in the 
defense of those 'belittled and ridiculed 
creatures' of the air against whom so 
much is said yet whose absence would be 
greatly regretted and noticed: THE AN- 
NOUNCERS!"— James J. GlSMONDI, 
Uniontown, Pa. 

"Down with Daylight Saving Time! 
When the hateful device is in effect we 
fans in the Southwest are deprived of the 
best programs, which usually are on the 
air around 8 p. m. Eastern time." — 
Marrene Britton, El Paso, Texas. 




Newly perfected, 
rapid, direct-to-fat 
elicer with outfit at 
no extra charge. 



NEW "HOME 

FACTORY" 

MAKES 

PERFECT POTATO CHIPS— 

DONUTS— SALTED NUTS 

Stop looking for something difficult. 
Turn potatoes into cash. I show you 
just how with my newly perfected 
outfit. Start anywhere. Very little 
cash needed. Exclusive location. 
Profits pour in. No experience 
needed. I furnish the plans. Begin 
anywhere — village, small town, city 
or suburb. A big opportunity is 
waiting. Business permanent. 

MAKE UP TO 300% PROFIT 
ON RAW MATERIALS 

Raw materials are plentiful and cheap. 
Highly perfected outfit and confidential 
plans make operation simple, with 
startling profits certain. 

WE HELP FINANCE YOU 

and locate you. Send no money, just name, lor book of 
facts and free opportunity. 

LONG-EAKINS COMPANY 

1185-5 High St. Springfield, Ohio 



Cash in on Big Demand 

Starchless collar shirts — never wilt, shrink, curl or 
wrinkle. Also hose, ties, underwear, work shirts, suede 
shirts. Liberal cash commissions, bonuses. New line 
FREE. Write for It NOW. 
Dept. L7, Public Service Mills, West New York, N. J. 

CATARRH and SINUS 

CHART- FREE 

Guaranteed Relief or No Pay. Stop hawking— 
stuffed-up nose — bad breath — Sinus irritation — 
phlegm -filled throat. Send Post Card or letter 
for New Treatment Chart and Money-Back Offer. 
40,000 Druggists sell Hall's Catarrh Medicine. 

63rd year in business. . . Write today! 
F.J.CHENEY & CO. Oept.2311 TOLEDO.O. 



KEEP YOUR HANDS 
FREE OF "CMP 



Use Hess Witch Hazel Cream — a 
few drops at a time — a few times 
every day, and your hands will 
stay free of chap. Hess is never 
sticky — is completely absorbed by 
the skin. Keeps your skin soft as 
velvet. Sold in all 10c stores. 
THE E. E. HESS CO., Brook, 




You Can-DANCE IN 

THREE HOURS— Now 

Just three hours practice, at home without music or part- 
ner. It's a new and simplified course in ballroom dancing, 
written by C. F. Appelbaum, dance instructor at the St. 
Louis Y for 4- years. It's a full course 24 lessons for $1.00. 
Send stamps, cash or money order. Money refunded if not 
entirely satisfied. 

LEARN TO DANCE IN THREE HOURS 
CARL F. APPELBAUM, 1120 So. Cheyenne, Tulsa, Okla. 

SHARE HOLLYWOOD'S MOST 

GUARDED BEAUTY SECRET 

Is your neck and contour losing its youthful 
line? Francess Kable's Hollywood Contour 

Band, used and endorsed by famous stage and 
screen stars — 

1. Rebuildsrelaxedneck and contour muscles. 

2. Corrects under-chin heaviness. 

3. Builds up receding chin. 

4. Creates and protects the perfect contour. 

FREE— IF YOU ORDER NOW Introductory offer 
consisting of: Original $2.00 Hollywood Contour Band, 
Jar of Neck and Contour Cream, and complete instruc- 
tions for home treatment— Just send a dollar bill to 

FRANCESS KABLE. INC. 
400 N. Michigan Ave., Dept. lot, Chicago, 111. 





DARK-EYES' 



"3u,imorCry~ NEVER FADES OR RUNS 

PERMANENT DARKENER for Eyebrows and Eyelashes 
Absolutely Safe, , , Not a Mascara , , . One Application lasts 4 
to 5 weeks. Trial size, 25c, Reg. size, 12 Applications, $1. 

S^Came - 

Address 

"DARK-EYES" LAB.,D P I.19-M,412 Orleans St,. Chicago.IU, 



86 



RADIO MIRROR 



The Critic on the Hearth 

(Continued from page 3) 

NBC daily except Saturday and Sun- 
day. 7:30 P. M., 15 min. 

SATURDAY MUSICALE answers the 
demand of the discriminating for more 
high quality music. Outstanding soloists 
sing masterpieces of the world's greatest 
composers. The program is arranged by 
the Women's National Radio Committee. 

CBS Saturdays, 2 P. M., 30 min. 

RHYTHM OCTETTE presents Gould 
and Shefter duets, the Three X Sisters 
and the Three Scamps, in individual and 
ensemble interpretations of popular re- 
frains. This is a big assemblage of talent 
for a too-brief program. 

NBC Fridays, 7:30 P. M., 15 min. 



CLYDE BARR1E, baritone, sings Ne- 
gro melodies with the gripping sincerity 
characteristic of his race and the finished 
technique of a master vocalist. His 
French classics are as delightful to sophis- 
ticates as his folk songs are to those who 
love the plaintive melodies of the planta- 
tions. 

CBS Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:30 
A. M., 15 min. 

SPOTLIGHT RFVUE is an enchanting 
matinee half-hour of musical varieties in- 
cluding choice bits from light opera and 
musical comedies. A vocal ensemble is 
accompanied by a concert orchestra. 

NBC Wednesdays, 3:30 P. M., 30 min. 

MARTHA AND HAL is a program of 
music and dialogue unusual chiefly for its 
humorless jokes. A chaming Dixie drawl 
in feminine tones helps to redeem a pro- 
gram which still fails to postpone many 
luncheon dates. 

NBC Fridays, 12 noon, 15 min. 

JOHN CHARLES THOMAS sustains 
his wide circle of radio friends through a 
slight change in name of program and a 
shift to Frank Tour's orchestra. Formerly 
"Our Home on the Range" the name is 
now "John Charles Thomas and His 
Neighbors." A noted concert baritone, 
Mr. Thomas has added to his select fol- 
lowing a vast group of dial fans who love 
the rural philosophy of his radio theme. 

NBC Wednesdays, 9 P. M., 45 min. 

AL PEARCE'S GANG shifts from af- 
ternoon to a well-deserved evening spot. 
This comedy program is lively and melo- 
dious and should start off any week-end 
party with the kind of "bang" that trans- 
forms strangers into pals. 

NBC Fridays, 10:30 P. M., 30 min. 

ROY CAMPBELL'S ROYALISTS are a 
group of excellent vocalists with a swing- 
ing, sometimes haunting tempo. Their 
songs can dispel the gloom of that occa- 
sional "blue Monday." 

NBC Mondays, 3 P. M., 15 min. 

WOR SINFONIETTA, conducted by 
Alfred Wallenstein, Philharmonic's first 
'cellist, strikes the high note of the mid- 
week classical offerings. It is my favorite 
background for soft lights, a friendly pipe 
and quiet meditation. 

MBS Wednesdays, 9:30 P. M., 30 min. 



new wi 



M 



> /. 



k ••< 




o AND QUICK FONDANT 



9 

T? aE le Brand 
^ CU |wl t ened Con- 
densed Milk 
V 2 teaspoon vanilla 



3 QVJIV-^ ■ j 

uaWy int °, S using fork. Add va- 

h— .— ssSgSsssg 



FREE! New Cook Book of Wonders! 

New !New! NEW! Just off the press! "Magic Recipes" is a thrilling new 
successor to "Amazing Short-cuts."Gives you brand-new recipes — unbelievably 
quick and easy — for pies, cookies, candies, frostings ! Sure-fire custards I Easy- 
to-make refrigerator cakes ! Quicker ways to delicious salad dressings, sauces, 
beverages, ice creams (freezer and automatic). Address: The Borden Sales Co., 
Inc., Dept.MG-1 15, 350 Madison Ave., New York NX 




Name. 
Street 
City- 



State- 



(Frint name and address plainly) 
This coupon may be pasted on a penny postcard. 



Oua/itu 




KIN 

Way/ 



T^HE new Larkin 

*■ Catalog is ready. 
Spend a cent for a postcard 
and ask us to send you your 
free copy, but don't spend a 
cent for your wardrobe until 
you see our lovely new Edna 
May dresses. So stylish, so 
serviceable and so inexpensive! 
The one pictured costs you 
only $1.98. 

See, too, all the new valuable 
Larkin Premiums and read 
about the Larkin Cozy-Home 
Club. Your free Larkin Cata- 
og also tells about the liberal 
rewards paid Larkin Secreta- 
ries. Mail us a postcard. 



L&rJfcin Cxxa 



'ac, 



666 Seneca St., 
BUFFALO. N. Y. 




BURNING 
AND TIRED? 



Dust — wind — sun glare — reading — 
tire your eyes. For relief, cleanse them 
daily with Murine. Soothing. Refresh- 
ing. Used safely for nearly 40 years. 



87 



RADIO M I RROR 



from the singer, is now receiving alimony 
to the amount of $137.50 weekly by direc- 
tion of the Court. 

Phil Regan, the singing ex-gendarme, 
who has been doing so well on the movie 
lots is altar-bound with Josephine 
Dwyer, according to my Hollywood 
scout. Miss Dwyer is a fellow Brooklyn- 
ite whom Phil met when he was on the 
police force . . . Deems Taylor, recently 
divorced from Mary Kennedy, is reported 
engaged to Colette d'Arville. 

And attention, Mr. Census Taker: Boys 
to Walter Winchell, Craig McDonald and 
Ward Wilson . . . Girls to Dick Leibert 
and Jan Peerce . . . And Martha Mears 
was preparing to welcome a little 
stranger as this was tapped out on the 
typewriter. Her husband is Sid Brokaw, 
of Ozzie Nelson's band. 

TRICK VOCAL CORDS 

George Jessel, piqued at not being able 
to get started in radio, once observed that 
to succeed as a broadcaster "you must 
be able to make funny noises." Animus 
may have prompted Jessel's caustic com- 
ment but the remark is not without its 
elements of truth. For there is a large 
group of radio artists who owe their suc- 
cess on the air to their ability to capital- 
ize the antics of their vocal cords. 

For instance, there is Poley McClintock, 
the frog-voiced singer with Fred War- 
ing's Pennsylvanians. Poley — right name, 
Roland — started as drummer (and still 
is) with the band and when with the Glee 
Club sings first tenor, that being his nat- 
ural voice. Since a lad in knickerbockers 
McClintock has been able to effect sub- 
bass tones and Waring, upon discovering 
that faculty, tried him out with special ar- 
rangements of comedy songs. The result 
was so satisfactory with listeners that 
Poley, anonymous as a drummer and 



What's New on Radio Row 

(Continued from page 11) 

first tenor, became an identity as the 
frog-throated singer. 

What makes "One Man's Family," 
"The House of Glass," "The O'Neills" 
and similar sketches of American life 
so popular? The fact that we are a 
nation of eavesdroppers with our ears 
ever alert to hear what our next-door 
neighbors are saying. At least that's the 
theory of a radio expert who has given 
the matter much thought and study, and 
it sounds logical at that. 

RADIO REFORMS 

Fred Allen, it seems, has been viewing 
with alarm conditions in broadcasting. 
He withdrew himself to his study and 
emerged from that cloister with a whole 
sheaf of suggestions for the reform of 
radio, among them the following: 

All early birds who hope you are 
doing the morning exercises with them 
should be hustled back to bed for an- 
other hour. 

All cooking experts who skip a line of 
a recipe in their scripts should be forced 
to go from house to house and collect the 
burnt offerings reposing in housewives' 
ovens. 

All bridge experts who explain intri- 
cate plays on the air should be dummy 
for the duration of the program. 

All band leaders who feature their brass 
sections should have their heads buried 
in French horns as far as the Adam's 
apple while their horn players render 
"Wagon Wheels" fortissimo. 

All comedians should be prohibited by 
law from laughing at their own jokes, 
thus insuring a one hundred per cent lull. 

All studio audiences should be equipped 
with woolen mittens. Their applause 
would then be seen and not heard and 
those who listen at home would not be 
disturbed. 



All announcers who spell out one syl- 
lable words should have their tongues 
tied to the top buttons of their vests. 

POSTSCRIPTS 

Leigh Lovell, popular with listeners for 
five years as the Dr. Watson of the Sher- 
lock Holmes broadcasts, died of heart 
disease at his home in Hampshire, En- 
gland. He was 63 years old . . . Elsie 
Janis, injured with her husband in an auto 
accident, underwent an operation by a 
plastic surgeon to avoid a facial scar . . . 
Budd Hulick, of Colonel Stoopnagle and 
Budd, early in life was a soda-jerker and 
still gets a kick of mixing his own malted 
milks. 

As we went to press the Pepsodent 
people were plotting a Sunday night 
variety entertainment on which Amos 'n' 
Andy would appear in addition to their 
regular five-nights a week program . . . 
You'll be surprised to learn the identity 
of the critic of his radio performances 
whose word is law with Dick Powell. It 
is his cook . . . Ray Perkins is the son of 
a clergyman. 

Jack Fulton was originally a trombone 
player with George Olsen and Paul 
Whiteman and invented the magamute 
for that instrument. His room-mate, 
none other than Bing Crosby, persuaded 
Paul to give Jack his first chance to 
sing a solo . . . Victor Lombardo, young- 
est of the four Lombardo brothers, used 
to be called "Useless" by them. But when 
he joined the band five years ago as bari- 
tone saxophonist that term was dropped. 

David Broekman, conductor of the 
California Melodies program, has scored 
nearly two hundred pictures. Among the 
notable films for which he arranged the 
music are "All Quiet on the Western 
Front," "King of Jazz," "Back Street," 
"Phantom of the Opera" and "Strictly 
Dishonorable." 



Ripley's House of Strange Treasures 



is smaller than a baseball, as you see. In 
the South American Republics, the taking 
and shrinking of human heads was an 
ancient rite, and it continues in modern 
times, though all the countries have 
passed laws against it. The bootlegging 
of human heads is very profitable to the 
natives. The method of reducing and 
shrinking the heads remained a secret for 
many years. It is comparatively recently 
that there have been actual witnesses to 
the process. 

"Friends of mine in Quito told me of a 
German scientist who ventured into the 
unexplored Pongo de Seriche, the land of 
the Jivaros, in hope of learning their se- 
cret. Six months later a shrunken and 
mummified head with a red beard and 
light hair was offered for sale in the city." 

He will tell us sometime of the process, 
he says. It has to do with slitting the 
scalp downward to the nape of the neck 
and dropping hot stones inside the skull. 
We are glad when Ripley returns the 
grisly head to its resting place on the 
glass case. 

Next, he draws our attention to a huge 
tusk which belonged to a mammoth pre- 
historic animal. It was found in Siberia 
and weighs about eight hundred pounds. 

"Imagine the size of an animal 5,000 
years ago, whose head could carry two 
tu'ks as heavy as this," he points out. 

It isn't easy to do, but Ripley raises the 



(Continued from page 47) 

tusk and holds it upright. To see his 
strength, recalls the fact that he is a 
notable athlete, who has for a number of 
years held the handball championship of 
the New York Athletic Club. 

Later before a window with exquisite 
Italian wood-carved figures, our host seats 
himself for a moment and lights a cigar- 
ette from the Candle that Burns- at Both 
Ends. It is a small wax taper with both 
ends caught fast between a pair of an- 
cient scissors. It was invented by the 
famous Presbyterian churchman, John 
Knox, who was a great friend of Mary 
Queen of Scots. 

"And, taking a friend's privilege, he 
used to scold Mary for wearing lace on 
her clothes," Ripley laughed. "He thought 
that was frivolous. He was very austere 
in his habits and beliefs, and wanted 
everyone else to be that way." 

The clergyman's ingenuous candle is one 
of Ripley's favorite possessions. A copy 
of the original is in a museum in Edin- 
burgh, Scotland. 

In the center of the Blue Room is a big 
Japanese temple gong. When struck, it 
will resound for ten minutes without stop- 
ping, and it is a marvelous musical note 
that will thrill you for ten minutes. When 
Ripley was in Japan — where he is greatly 
beloved, by the way, and where he is 
never allowed to buy a railroad ticket or 
pay a hotel bill — he was so enchanted 



with the temple gongs that he commis- 
sioned a Japanese friend to buy one for 
him, at any cost. After much difficulty, 
an available one was located. It belonged 
to a temple that had burned down in the 
shadow of Fujiyama. 

These are but a few of the priceless 
Ripley treasures. The room is filled with 
objects. 

"What is there left for you to see? 
Where could you possibly go now that 
you haven't been?" we ask this amazing 
adventurer. 

"Oh, there are a lot of places left that 
I want to see," "Rip" says, with that glint 
in his eye that means wanderlust. "Next, 
I want to go to the West Coast of Africa, 
where there are no harbors, and boats 
have to be swung on cranes to land people. 

"I want to go to Central America. And, 
of all places I've seen, China calls me back 
the most. I want to see it again. It is so 
utterly unlike anything else in the world. 
It's unreal." 

And, before he comes to the NBC mi- 
crophone in October the sands of Abys- 
sinia will most likely have spilled through 
those white sandals of his, he admits. 
Wherever there's anything unusual going 
on in the world, you'll find Ripley. But 
always he returns to that magnificent 
home in Westchester— that unique House 
of Stranae Treasures. 




ONLY 

RADIO COVERING 

4h TO 2,400 MtTtRJ 



30 Dags {ME Trial ! 




PUSH-BUTTON TUNING 
(Noises Suppressed) 

Now, Push Button Silent Tuning is offered 
for first time! Simply pushing Silencer 
Button hushes set between stations . . . sup- 
presses noises. Pressing Station Finder But' 
ton automatically indicates proper dial posi- 
tion for bringing in extremely weak stations. 

Acousti-Tone V-Spread Design 

(Patent Pending) 

. . . Establishes new radio style overnight! 
The V'Front Dispersing Vanes were devel- 
oped by Midwest engineers as a result of 
a study of directional effect of the Midwest 
Full Scope High Fidelity Speaker. These 
Vanes spread the beautiful lacework of the 
"highs" throughout the entire room in a 
scientific manner . . . directing the High 
Fidelity waves uniformly to the ear. Send 
for new FREE 40-page catalog. It pic- 
tures the complete line of beautiful 1936 
Acousti-Tone V-Spread consoles 
. . . and chassis ... in four colors. 

FULL SCOPE HIGH FIDELITY 
Brilliant 
Concert Tone 

Now, get complete 
range of audible 
frequencies from 
30 to 16,000 
cycles, being 
transm itted by 
four new High Fi- 
delity Broadcasting 
stations— WlXBS, 
W9XBY, W2XR 
and W6XAL. 
Glorious new 
Acousti-tone is 
achieved 

assuring life-like, 
crystal -clear 
"concert" realism. 




V-FRONT 



EVERYWHERE radio enthusiasts are say- 
ing: "Have you seen the new 18-tube, 
6 tuning ranges, Acousti-Tone V-Spread Midwest?" 
It's an improvement over Midwest's 16-tube set, 
so popular last season. This amazingly beautiful, 
bigger, better, more powerful, super selective, 
18-tube radio . . is not obtainable in retail stores 
. . . but is sold direct to you from Midwest Labo- 
ratories at a positive saving of 30% to 50%. 
(This statement has been verified by a Certified 
Public Accountant!) Out-performs $250.00 sets. 
Approved by over 120,000 customers. Before you 
buy any radio, write for FREE 40-page 
catalog. Never before so much radio for so 
little money. Why pay more? You are triple- 
protected with: One- Year Guarantee, Foreign 
Reception Guarantee and Money-Back Guarantee. 

80 ADVANCED 1936 FEATURES 

Scores of marvelous features, many exclusive, explain 
Midwest super performance and world-wide reception 
enable Midwest to bring in weak distant 
foreign stations, with full loud speaker volume, on 
channels adjacent to locals. They prove why many orchestra 
leaders use Midwest radios to study types of harmony and 
rhythmic beats followed by leading American and foreign 
orchestras. Only Midwest tunes as low as 4Vi meters . . . 
only Midwest offers push button tuning and Acousti-Tone 
V-spread design. See pages 12 to 20 in FREE catalog. 
Read about advantages of 6 tuning ranges — offered for 
first time: — E, A, L, M, H and U . . . that make this 
super de luxe 18-tube set the equivalent of six 
different radios . . . offer tuning ranges not 
obtainable in other radios at any price. 

DEAL DIRECT WITH 
LABORATORIES 

No middlemen's prof- 
its to pay — you buy UP 
at wholesale price di- "JO, 
rect from laboratories 

. . . saving 30% to 50%. Increasing costs''^ 
are sure to result in higher radio prices soon. Buy 
before the big advance . . . NOW . . . while 

you can take advantage of Midwest's sensational values. 
You can order your 1936 Full Scope High Fidelity 
Acousti-Tone radio from the 40-page catalog with as 
much certainty of satisfaction as if you were to come 
yourself to our great radio laboratories. You save 30% to 
50% . . . you get 30 days FREE trial ... as little as 
$5.00 puts a Midwest radio in your home. Satisfaction 
guaranteed or money back. Write today, for FREE catalog. 



world's 

GRCAT«T RADIO VALUt 



with New 
GIANT 
TH£ATR£ 
SONIC 



TtR,HSASLOW A sfl| 



op 

DOWN 



Thrill to new explorations in sections of radio 
spectrum that are strangers to you. Every type 
of broadcast from North and South America, 
Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia is now 
yours. Send today for money-saving facts. 



Two Strikes on Other Radios! 

Chicago, 111. — It's as big a thrill as 
smacking one over the fence to bring 
in distant foreign stations like locals. 
Midwest radios are the best obtainable 
and have two strikes on any other make. 
'Gabby" Hartnett 
(Chicago Cubs) 



*<5L*-c, ^LlLiM: 







England, Spain, Italy, 
Most Every Night 

Washington, D. C. — We are more 

pleased with our Midwest every day. 
We tune in GSB, London — EAQ, Spain 
— DJC, Germany— 12RO, Rome, etc., 
most every evening with local volume. 

Robert H. Gerhardt. L. 




ShMl 



METAL TUBES 

This Midwest is furnished with the new glass- 
metal counterpart tubes. Set sockets are 
designed to accept glass-metal or METAL 
tubes, without change. Write for FREE facts. 



MAIL COUPON TODAY' 



FOB 

FREE 30-DAY TRIAL OFFER and 40- 
PAGE FOUR-COLOR FREE CATALOG 



m IP WEST RADIO CORP. 



: MIDWEST RADIO CORP., 

: Dept. 5 1 -E. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

i Without obligation on my part, send me 

\ your new FREE catalog, complete de- 

I tails of your liberal 30-day FUEE trial 

I offer, and FREE Miniature Rotating 

: lS-tube Dial. This is NOT an order. 

: Name , 



User-Agents ; 
M ake Easy: 
Extra Money- 

Check Here : 
for pi: 

Details I — I : 



DEPT. 51 -E CINCINNATI, OHIO U.S.A. 



Established I920 Cable Address MIRACO All Codes 



\z C Check here, If interested in a Midwest Auto Radio. 

IIIIIIIIIIIIMUIIIIMMItlllllllllltlll IllllllllllinilllllllllllUI 



\m 



NO THANKS! 

YD RATHER HAVE 

A LUCKY. 

They're easy on 
my throat 



■ 



ITS THE TOBACCO TiHAT COUNTS 



There are . no finer tobaccos than those used in 







GLADYS 
SWARTHOUT 



JfcOJl 



DECEMBER 



SCOOP! 

Mrs. LANNY ROSS 

answers all your 

QUESTIONS! 



WILL WAR GUNS 
SILENCE RADIO? 
A thrilling expose 
. of secret plans . 









World's Greatest Authors 

Now Available in Gorgeous 

Single Volume Editions 




ECONOMY 

EDUCATIONAL 

LEAGUE 



THESE authors and their works need no 
recommendation— the books themselves 
need only to be seen to be desired. Bound in 
beautiful red-brown Florentine (limp) leather 
richly hand decorated and with 14 karat gold 
stamping, thin strongly fabricated paper, clear 
cut, easily readable type, rounded corners and 
color toned edges, with nearly one thousand 
pages to each volume, aside from their sterling 
literary worth, these books give an added 
touch of exotic luxury to any home no matter 
how modest or how affluent. Wherever possi- 
ble they contain the author's complete works. 
Where his works are too voluminous his se- 
lected finest works are included. As gifts they 
are ideal. To be appreciated they must be 
seen. Send for one or more today at our risk. 
We will refund your money cheerfully if for 
any reason they prove unsatisfactory. $2.29 
each— any three for $6.50. Circle the numbers 
of the books you want. Use the coupon. 



102, Balzac; 103, Anton Chekhov; 104, Boccaccio; 105, 
Alphonse Daudet; 106, Conan Doyle; 107, Droll Stories; 
108, Alexander Dumas; 109, Ralph Waldo Emerson; 110, 
Gustave Flaubert; 111, H. Rider Haggard; 112, Nathaniel 
Hawthorne; 113, Victor Hugo; 114, Henrik Ibsen; 115, Kip- 
ling; 116, de Maupassant; 117, Edgar Allen Poe; 118, 
Shakespeare (complete with thumb index); 119, Robert 
Louis Stevenson; 120, Tolstoi; 121, Voltaire; 122, Oscar 
Wilde; 123, Benvenuto Cellini; 124, Theophile Gautier; 
125, Jean Jacques Rousseau; 126, Emile Zola. 



$2.29 EACH • ANY THREE FOR $6.50 



Economy Educational League WG-12 

1926 Broadway, New York. 

I enclose $ for which please send postpaid the leather 

bound volumes indicated below. My money to be refunded on any 
unsatisfactory purchase. 



102 
103 
104 
105 
106 

Name. 

Street. 



107 
108 
109 
110 
111 



112 
113 
114 
115 
116 



117 
118 
119 
120 
121 



122 
123 
124 
125 
126 



1926 BR O ADWAY 



N EW YORK CITY 



Town State . 




"PINK TO 

AMAN'S first swift dingy 

look sometimes 
says . . . "You're a charming woman." 

And a woman's eyes may answer . . . 
"You're a likeable person." 

And then she smiles. Lucky for both 
of them if it's a lovely, quick flash of 
white teeth, in healthy gums. 

For a glimpse of dingy teeth and ten- 
der gums can blast a budding romance in 
a split second! 

WHY IS "PINK TOOTH BRUSH" 
SO COMMON? 

It's very simple. The soft foods that we 
all eat nowadays — almost exclusively— 



OTH BRUSH" makes her avoid a 
teeth and tender gums destroy her 

cannot possibly give teeth and gums 
enough work to do to keep them healthy. 
They grow lazy. Deprived of the natural 
stimulation of hard, coarse foods, they 
become sensitive, tender. And then, pres- 
ently, "pink tooth brush" warns you 
that your gums are unhealthy — suscep- 
tible to infection. 

Modern dental practice suggests Ipana 
plus massage for several good reasons. If 
you will put a little extra Ipana on 
brush or fingertip and massage your 
gums every time pu brush your teeth, 
you will understand. Rub it in thor- 




II close-ups — 

charm oughly. Massage it vig- 

orously . Do it regularly. 
And your mouth will feel cleaner. There 
will be a new and livelier tingle in your 
gums — new circulation, new firmness, 
new health. 

Make Ipana plus massage a regular 
part of your routine. It is the dentist's 
ablest assistant in the home care of the 
teeth and gums. For with healthy gums, 
you've ceased to invite "pink tooth 
brush." You are not likely to get gingi- 
vitis, pyorrhea and Vincent's disease. 
And you'll bring the clear and brilliant 
beauty of a lovely smile into any and 
every close-up. 

7Z-+ «" d •"* 



DECEMBER - 1935 




VOL 5 - NO. 2 



Mi/MM@M 



BELLE LANDESMAN, ASSISTANT EDITOR . 



ERNEST V. HEYN. 
EDITOR 



The Mad, Mad March of Time Fred Rutledge 

Talent and Jitters Curtis^ Mitchell 

The famous writer and editor lets us in on some inside stuff 

Untold Chapters in Grace Moore's Life. . . Caroline Somers Hoyt 
Why she turned her back on love and fortune three times 

Will War Guns Silence Radio? Jean Pelletier 

A thrilling expose of secret plans 

Meet Michael Bartlett Dan Warren 

He's the exciting new tenor on Jack Benny's program 

Mary 
until— 



10 
12 



Dangerous Paradise had a wedding all planned 



19 
20 
25 
26 



Kicked Upstairs! Ruth Geri 

The amazing discouragements Boake Carter overcame 

How Martha Mears Is Facing Motherhood Jane Cooper 

$500.00 in Cash Prizes 27 

The "Broadway Melody of 1936" — Radio Mirror Contest 
Facing the Music John Skinner 28 

All you want to know about songs, singers, and bands 
No More "Corporations" Ethel Carey 30 

Read this engrossing James Melton diet story 
The Adventures of Penelope Fictionized by Norton Russell 32 

Here's the dramatized story of Helen Hayes' new program 

All You Want to Know About Roses and Drums George Kent 35 

Amateurs at Life Fred Sammis 42 

Another fast-moving installment of this fascinating love story 

Secrets of a Society Hostess Cobina Wright 45 

Radio Mirror's Directory 48 

More vital statistics on NBC stars 



. WALLACE H. CAMPBELL, ART EDITOR 



In the January RADIO MIRROR 
On Sale November 26 




Coming next month: A revealing story of 
the unusual sacrifices Nino Martini has 
made for his career ... an absorbing 
behind-the-scenes feature on One Man's 
Family . . . an exciting open letter to Bing 
Crosby on the eve of his new broadcast 
series . . . many more just as interesting! 



What Do You Want to Say? 4 

Cash prizes for your opinions! 

What's New on Radio Row Jay Peters 6 

Reflections in the Radio Mirror 9 

A glimpse into the lives of Mr. and Mrs. Lanny Ross 

Pageant of the Airwaves 21 

Radio's colorful caravan in words and pictures 

Beauty a la Jessica Dragonette Joyce Anderson 41 

Coast-to-Coast Highlights 

Chicago Chase Giles 46 

Pacific Dr. Ralph L. Power 47 

Cooking for the Sisters of the Skillet. . . Mrs. Margaret Simpson 51 

We Have With Us 52 

The ideal program guide 

What Do You Want to Know? The Oracle 58 



ndcUd ntfoactunk 

The Critic on the Hearth 7 

A review of the new programs 

Gallery of Radio Romeos 

Leslie Howard 37 

Lawrence Tibbett 38 

Johny Green 39 

Tito Guizar 40 

A Radio Star Weighing Hundreds of 

Tonsl 64 

Winner of the Irene Rich Dress 89 



Coo&\ 



—PORTRAIT OF GLADYS SWARTHOUT 
BY TCHETCHET 



KADIO MIRROR (Copyright 1935) is fully protected by copyright, and the contents of this magazine may not be reprinted either wholly or in part 
without permission. Published monthly by Macfadden Publications, Inc., Washington and South Avenues, Dunellen, New Jersey. Executive and editorial 
office, 1926 Broadway, New York, N. Y. Bernarr Macfadden, President; Wesley E. Pape, Secretary; Irene T. Kennedy, Treasurer; Walter Hanlon, Adver. 
tising Director. Entered as second class matter September 14, 1933, at the Post Office at Dunellen, New Jersey, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Price 
in United States $1.00 a year; 10c a copy. In U. S. Possessions, Canada Newfoundland, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, 
Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras (Republic), Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, El Salvador, Spain and colonies 
(Balearic Islands, Canary Islands, and Spanish possessions on north coast of Africa), Uruguay, Venezuela. $1.50 a year; all other countries $2.50 a year. 
While Manuscripts, Photographs and Drawings are submitted at the owners' risk, every effort will be made to return those found unavailable if accompanied 
by 1st class postage. But we will not be responsible for any losses of such matter contributed. Contributors are especially advised to be sure to retain copies 
of their contributions; otherwise they are taking an unnecessary risk. Printed in the U. S. A. by Art Color Printing Company, Dunellen, N. J. 




18c a day at the FACTORY PRICE! 



Mail Coupon now 

l for NEW FREE CATALOG 

Your name and address on the coupon brings 
FREE to you the greatest Kalamazoo Stove, 
Range and Furnace catalog of all time. 
It displays over 200 styles and sizes — many 
in full color — more bargains than in 20 big 
stores — new stoves — new ideas — new color 
combinations — new features. It quotes rock- 
bottom, direct-to-you FACTORY PRICES. 



Now the Stove of Your Dreams for 
As Little As 18c a Day 

Easy credit — Easy terms. Kalamazoo qual- 
ity— FACTORY PRICES. 200 styles and 
sizes to choose from. Learn how more than 
950,000 satisfied customers have saved 
money by dealing with "A Kalamazoo 
Direct to You." Find out why Kalamazoo, 
established over 35 years, is now doing the 
biggest business in its history. Learn why 
Kalamazoo can give you better quality at a 
lower price. Mail coupon for new FREE 
Catalog! 

"Oven That Floats in Flame" 

This new catalog tells you about the great 
Kalamazoo plants, occupying 26 acres, em- 
ploying an army of men, making nothing 
but our own stoves and furnaces that are 
sold direct to you. It shows the scientific 



Testing Laboratory that insures the high- 
est standard of quality for every Kala- 
mazoo. It describes the numerous Kala- 
mazoo features; such as the prize-winning 
"Oven That Floats in Flame," "Ripple Oven 
Bottom," Copper Reservoirs, Non-Scorch 
Lids, Enameled Ovens, etc. 

Porcelain Enamel Stoves 

In this finely illustrated catalog you will 
thrjU at the new-style Porcelain Enamel 
Combination Gas, Coal and Wood Ranges, 
and Coal and Wood Ranges, so beautiful 
and colorful that you won't be content until 
you have one for your very own — Porcelain 
Enamel Circulating Heaters, including the 
famous Franklin and the new, ultra-modern 
Century, the handsomest, sturdiest ever 
seen — Furnaces — both pipe and pipeless. 
(Send rough sketch of your rooms for FREE 
plans.) Mail coupon today! 



Buy 



the 



Your Stoves Direct from 
Men Who Make Them 

Kalamazoo Improvements and Designs are 
modern, but Kalamazoo Quality is still 
the good, old-fashioned kind. We still build 
into every Kalamazoo the same high grade 
materials, the same fine workmanship that 
over 950,000 customers have known -for % 



of a century. We are specialists, building 
nothing but stoves and furnaces. When you 
deal with Kalamazoo, you deal direct with 
the Factory — direct with the men who 
actually make your stoves and furnaces. 
Don't pay more than the FACTORY 
PRICE — mail coupon today for the na- 
tion's greatest stove and furnace guide- 
book! 

What This Catalog Offers You 

1. Cash or Easy Terms — Year to Pay — as 

little as 18c a day. 

2. 30 Days FREE TRIAL— 360 Days Ap- 

proval Test. 

3. 24 Hour Shipment — Safe Delivery Guar- 

anteed. 

4. $100,000 Bank Bond Guarantee of Satis- 
faction. 

5. 5 Year Parts Guarantee. 

6. FREE Furnace Plans. 

Address all mail to Factory at Kalamazoo. 
THE KALAMAZOO STOVE CO., Mfrs. 

469 Rochester Avenue, Kalamazoo, Michigan 

Ware/louses.' Utica, N. Y.; Akron, Ohio; 

Harrisburg, Pa.; Springfield, Mass. 



"A Kalamazoo, 



Direct to You" 





$ Sort $ S*** $ $<"* $ S*"i $ **** $ $*** $ Sa^e $ 

KALAMAZOO STOVE CO., Mfrs. 

469 Rochester Avenue. Kalamazoo, Michigan 

Dear Sirs: Please send me your Free Catalog. 
Check articles in which you are interested 

Coal and Wood Range D 
Comb. Gas, Coal and Wood Range □ 
Heater □ Oil Stove Q Furnace Q 

Name . 



(.Please Print Name Plainly) 
Address . . . . , 



City State 

nlv 1c to mail M,'» coupon. Parte or coj>p it on tht bark of a Gott. Pat Card) 



WHAT DO YOU WANT TO 




OW that the new and old fall programs are in lull 
swing and you're bursting with criticism for and 
against, why not relieve your mind and let the radio 
program makers know how their shows are taking effect? 
Prizes for best letters, of course— $20.00 for the best, $10.00 
for the second best and $1.00 each for the next five selected. 
Address your criticism to the Editor, Radio Mirror, 1926 
Broadway. New York City, and mail it by November 22. 

$20.00 PRIZE 

In common with other radio fans I am beginning to fear 
that some of our brightest stars are lost in the wilds of 
Hollywood. They "go for a few weeks to make a picture," 
but the weeks become months and they are still absent. 
If contracts require them to stay indefinitely why shouldn't 
all of them be aired from the Coast as a few now are? 
Radio popularity is often a very ephemeral thing, and new 
talent is crowding the airways. We welcome the new- 
comers, but do not want them to supplant our favorites. 

There is another risk for the radio star who goes into 
pictures. Will his work on the screen enhance or diminish 
his popularity on the air? I recall one feature film which 
certainly added nothing to the appeal of the star as actor 
or singer. 

Lydia King, Drexel Hill. Pa. 

$10.00 PRIZE 

It seems to me that radio is becoming more and more 
like a record playing the same thing over and over again. 
One radio star starts an amateur contest and in a month's 
time no matter when you turn on your radio, an amateur's 
voice gives you the earache. Even on Sunday there are 
two nation-wide amateur hours closely following one an- 
other. Then too, take the comedians, there is hardly any 
difference between Joe Cook and Joe Penner or Block and 
Sully and Burns and Allen. Is there? I think that when 
one program starts a certain type of entertainment no 
other person should be allowed to imitate it. 

Conrad F. Davif.s, Baltimore. Md. 

4 



SAY? 



This is your page, readers! Here's a chance to get 
your opinions in printl Write your letter today, 
have your say, and maybe you'll win the big prize! 



This is Columbia's newest singing attraction, Lois 
Ravel. The blue-eyed, auburn-haired gal was born 
in Baltimore, Maryland. She's been choir singer, 
night club entertainer and musical comedy star. 



$1.00 PRIZE 

My favorite of daytime programs is the "Breakfast Club 
of the Air" for it does "stick" with you all day. 

Its toastmaster, Don McNeil, offers cheerful chatter 
that is just as crisp and crunchy as toast itself. 

The good "coffee-like" refreshing and sparkling music of 
Walter Blaufuss and his boys is very stimulating: 

For sugar and cream we have Edna Odell and Jack 
Owens, both grand singers of songs! 

And for variety, the "Merry Macs," the Morin Sisters 
and the Three Flats lend their pleasing voices, all of which 
comprise a musical menu that should tickle the most fas- 
tidious palate. 

Agnes A. Allan, Lakewood, Ohio. 

$1.00 PRIZE 

Golden Rules for radio listeners — and aren't we all! 

PERMIT others to have their own notions of radio en- 
tertainment; don't spoil what may be fine amusement for 
someone else by your personal criticism. 

SUBMIT to advertising talks even though you may 
dislike them — if it weren't for the advertisers you might as 
well disconnect your radio (they're the guys that make the 
finest programs possible). Also use their products when- 
ever you legitimately can. 

TRANSMIT your special enjoyment of a program by 
mentioning it to your friends, and finally: 

REMIT a note of thanks occasionally to sponsors of 
artists who have given you particular pleasure — the inspira- 
tion of artists, the incentive to sponsors to continue a pro- 
gram, comes from expressed public appreciation as well as 
sales. 

Catherine Mervick, Providence, R. I. 

$1.00 PRIZE 

We are very much isolated from the rest of the world 
up here in the Tusayan pines. No movies, no good music, 
and no shopping facilities. Nothing but our radio for en- 
tertainment and from it we have our pleasure, education, 
religion and news. 

Every evening our radio takes us to the theaters to en- 
joy the latest dramas and brings to us messages from the 
important and interesting personalities in the limelight 



I 



of the day. We listen to rhe latest music 
and enjoy the old airs of yesterday played 
by the best orchestras in the country. 

We enjoy our window shopping through 
the advertisements. 

We eagerly wait for the news broadcasts 
bringing us the daily events of the world 
Mrs. J. V. Galindo, 
Tusayan, Arizona. 

$1.00 PRIZE 

1 think that the greatest star on the 
radio today is Rudy Vallee. I cannot at- 
tend many movies or plays, but he brings 
the leading actors into my home each 
week. He presents some of the best 
comedians of the screen, radio and stage. 
His novelty acts such as the talking par- 
rot, which he presented a few months ago, 
Robert L. Ripley. Tom Terris, the ad- 
venturer, etc., are of the best. His sing- 
ing is very good and the orchestra is one 
of the best on the air. The atmosphere of 
his program is that of a theater and when 
1 listen to it I feel that I am in a real 
theater. That's why I say "orchids to 
Rudy Vallee." 

Joseph W. Curtis, 
Dorchester. Mass. 

$1.00 PRIZE 

For the funniest, snappiest, dizziest, daf- 
fiest piece of entertainment on the air, I'll 
take George Burns and Gracie Allen with 
their whimsical, nonsensical foolishness. 
Without a doubt, they thoroughly deserve 
the title of "radio's brightest dimwits." 

You need not be dubious about letting 
the kiddies hear George and Gracie, either, 
because their chatter is full of good, 
clean fun. When you're feeling down in 
the dumps some Wednesday evening, just 
give them a trial and 1 think you will 
agree with me when I say that they are 
the best medicine for chasing the blues. 
Elizabeth Van Geuder, 
Washington, D. C. 

HONORABLE MENTION 

"If 1 were Czar of radio I would en- 
gage the incomparable Jessica Dragonette 
as prima donna of light operas and re- 
quest that she take the speaking as well as 
the singing role, for her speaking voice 
is equally as lovely as her singing." — 
Geraldine Cleaver, Anita, Iowa. 

"I want to give three big cheers to the 
unknown sound-effects men." — Jack Dorf- 
man, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

"There is no need for anyone not to 
be informed on any subject these days 
with men like Edwin C. Hill, Boake Car- 
ter, Lowell Thomas, etc., giving us the 
■best they have." — Mrs. Minnie B. Marx. 
Chicago. 111. 

"We must remember that we are get- 
ting, absolutely free, a billion dollars 
worth of amusement for the mere trouble 
of twisting a dial." — Joseph Fischer, San 
Antonio, Texas. 

"My pet peeve is the droll announcer 
who puts the soft pedal on my favorite 
tune in transcripts, in favor of advertis- 
ing." — George A. Kremer. Granite City, 
111. 

"My husband always says that if the 
house caught on fire I would tuck the 
baby under one arm and the radio under 
the other." — Mrs. A. Stoppel, Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

"It burns me up to have a program 
like "Mary Marlin," called "sugary." — 
Catherine Fuelling, Canton, Ohio. 




3 have . . . 

REDUCED MY HIPS 

9 INCHES wilk Ike 
PERFOLASTIC GIRDLE" 

. . . wrlies Jpi'u, Jean utealij 



"I read an 'ad' of the 
Perfolastic Company 
...and tent for FREE 

rOfOci 



"They allowed me to 
wear their Perforated 
Girdle for 10 day* 

on trial". 



REDUCE 

YOUR WAIST AND HIPS 

J INCHES ^|A DAYS 

9 IN IW OR 

...it won't cost you one penny! 

WE WANT YOU to try the 
Perfolastic Girdle and Uplift 
Brassiere. Test them for yourself 
for 10 days absolutely TREE. Then 
if without diet, drugs or exercise, 
you have not reduced at least 3 
inches around waist and hips, they 
will cost you nothing! 

Reduce Quickly, Easily, and Safely! 

• The massage-li ke action of this 
famous Perfolastic Reducing Gir- 
dle and Brassiere takes the place of 
months of tiring exercises. You do 
nothing, take no drugs, eat all you 
wish, yet, with every move the 
marvelous massage-like action 
gently reduces surplus fat, stimu- 
lating the body once more into 
energetic health. 

Ventilated . . . to Permit the 
Skin to Breathe! 

• And it is so comfortable! The venti- 
lating perforations allow the skin pores to 
breathe normally. The inner surface of 
the Perfolastic is a delightfully soft, satin- 
ized fabric, especially designed to wear 
next to the body. It does away with all 
irritation, chafing and discomfort, keep- 
ing your body cool and fresh at all times. 
There is no sticky, unpleasant feeling. A 
special adjustable back allows for perfect 
fit as inches disappear. 

Don't Wait Any Longer. . . ActToday! 

• You can prove to yourself quickly and 
definitely whether or not this very effi- 
cient girdle and brassiere will reduce you. 
You do not need to risk one penny . . . try 
fhem for 10 days ... at our expense! 



"The manage-like 
action did- it .. .the 
(at seemed to nave 
melted away". 



"In a very short time 
I had reduced my hips 
9 INCHES and my 
20 



•TEST ...the 

PERFOLASTIC GIRDLE 
FOR 10 DAYS 

. . . st our expense I 




SEND FOR TEN DAY FREE TRIAL OFFER' 



PERFOLASTIC, Inc. 

Dept. 2812, 41 EAST 42nd ST~ New York, N. Y 
Please send me FREE BOOKLET describing 
and illustrating the new Perfolastic Girdle and 
Brassiere, also sample of perforated rubber and 
particulars of your 10-DAY FREE TRIAL OFFER. 

Name_ 



Address. 
City_ 



.State. 



Use Coupon or Send Name and Address on Penny Post Card 



WHAT'S NEW ON RADIO ROW 



By JAY PETERS 



JEALOUSY among professional 
folk is no secret. It has been 
the theme of many an engag- 
ing novel, play and picture, and the 
whole world knows how the green- 
eyed monster rules the lives of ar- 
tists. But to learn that the Sherlock 
Holmeses of one detective department 
in Washington are jealous of the pub- 
licity given the super-sleuths of an- 
other government division — well, that 
IS NEWS! . 

It all comes to the surface, this al- 
leged craving for the spotlight by ri- 
val departments of criminal-catchers, 
through the fading from the kilo- 
cycles of Phillips Lord's "G-Men" 
series. The lowdown, as Radio Row 
hears it, is that the Secret Service 
Bureau of ' the United States Treas- 
ury, resenting the exploitation of the 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation of 
the United States Department of Jus- 
tice, brought so much pressure to bear, 
directly and indirectly, that the spon- 
sor found it discreet to drop the 
program. 

Whether or not this is the fact — 
and the truth, probabiy, never will be 
known — it is true that the "G-men" 
stories were the source of much irrita- 
tion and the cause of many headaches 
in the NBC studios from the very 
beginning. Lord had to exercise ex- 
traordinary care in the preparation of 
the scripts and observe so many 
"don'ts" imposed by the Department 
of Justice that he almost despaired 
of ever fulfilling his end of the con- 
tract. The continuity had to be 
okayed by Washington and then, to 
make sure there had been no devia- 
tion from the script, the complete pro- 
gram was piped from Radio City to 
Washington for final approval before 
the actual broadcast. At the start J. 
F.dgar Hoover, brilliant head of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, ap- 
peared as one of the characters, the 
part being played by Matt Crowley. 
After a few episodes orders came to 
cut Hoover from the proceedings and 
Radio Row understood those orders 
originated with United States Attor- 
ney General Cummings, Hoover's 
boss. 

And now you know why you are 
no longer hearing "G-Men" exploited 
on the air. They can exterminate Dil- 
lingers and Baby Face Nelsons and 
capture or kill desperate kidnapping 
gangs after machine-gun duels, but 
you will have to become acquainted 
with these heroic doings via the news- 



papers and magazines. Unless, of 
course, the Secret Service, which runs 
to justice less glamorous characters, 
like counterfeiters and smugglers, can 
find some way of preventing the jour- 
nals from functioning. Which is ex- 
tremely doubtful, for the press isn't 
so susceptible to official Washington 
as the radio. 

J^AN you imagine Shirley Temple 
^^ and Kate Smith co-starred in a 
movie? Well, that is just what's in 
the offing. However, there are several 
matters which will have to be ad- 
justed before this picture partnership 
can occur. Kate must get permission 
from her sponsor to transfer the 
broadcasts to Hollywood, so she can 
be handy to the lots, and a satisfac- 
tory script must be provided. Her 
cinema experiences have been un- 
happy and Kate won't take another 
chance unless the story gives her the 
opportunities she thinks she deserves. 

r B 1 HE death of Janet Lee, one of 
the most promising of the younger 
radio actresses, on the eve of her 
greatest triumph, climaxed a series of 
sinister events that has be-deviled 
the Court of Human Relations cast. 
In the memory of your correspondent 
there is no story of mishaps to com- 
pare with this one. Here are the high- 
lights of this eerie tale, all the evils 
befalling the performers in a period 
of seven weeks: 

First. Florence Baker, the leading 
lady, broke (Continued on page 46) 



Jimmy Wellington sails to join Can- 
tor on the Coast. His mother and 
some friends bid him adieu. Jimmy's 
the one with the mustache and 
Mother Wallington is on his right. 

Grace Line 



The return of Father Coughlin to the 
airwaves will mark a radical change 
in the Fighting Priest's attitude — 
from critic to staunch supporter of 
the Roosevelt Administration. Oys- 
ters "R" in season, and Maestro Paul 
Whiteman (below) knows when and 
where to get them on the half shell. 



H'.Wo World 




THE CRITIC ON THE 
HEARTH 

By Weldon Meliclc 

Brief Reviews of the New Programs 

WORLD PEACEWAYS. Orchids, 
palms (brought together rapidly) and 
huzzas to a program devoted to engender- 
ing the thought and wish for world peace 
in public consciousness. And showers of 
praise because this difficult type of pro- 
gram has been so well-balanced that it is 
prime entertainment throughout. It in- 
cludes eminent speakers whose words 
mean something, Howard Barlow's orches- 
tra and chorus, guest soloists of the first 
caliber, dramatic sketches in keeping with 
(he theme, and my favorite master of 
ceremonies, Deems Taylor. 

CBS Thurs.. 9:30 P. M.. 30 min. 

RICHARD LEIBERT. He winds the 
Radio City Music Hall pipe organ around 
his nimble fingers in a manner that would 
shame a piccolo player. What I'm trying 
to say is that this program is the nuts, 
no foolin'. 

NBC Mon. through Fri., 7:00 P.M., 
15 min. 

MUSIC IS MY HOBBY. One of the 

brighter ideas of the month. "Amateur'' 
musicians among famous people who have 
made their mark in other fields, air their 
melodious talents. -Not a gong in a car- 
load. 
NBC Thurs., 7:30 P. M„ 15 min. 

HARV AND ESTHER. The product 
is ballyhooed in this comedy (?) musical 
program as being "sweet as a nut," which 
perhaps refers to its star comedian, Teddy 
Bergman. Teddy is sweet in the script, 
but not as nutty as we have every right 
to expect after those side-splitting com- 
mentaries he does in the newsreels. His 
puns are the weakest heard this season. 
The singing voices, Audrey Marsh, Jack 
Arthur, and the Rhythm Girls, and Vic 
Arden's orchestra, are pleasing, but it will 
take a better program than this to com- 
pete with Vallee's Varieties, at the same 
hour. 

CBS Thurs., 8:00 P. M., 30 min. 

ATWATER KENT, however will give 
Rudy plenty to worry about. Looks as if 
the Battle of the Guest Stars will be 
fought out on this front if it takes all 
winter. CBS will flaunt the best musical 
talent available to draw that Thursday 
night audience. The Yeasters will in- 
wardly rage, and procure even better 
guest stars, if possible. And will we have 
tun ! 

CBS Thurs., 8:30 P. M., 30 min. 

PAUL WHITEMAN'S MUSIC HALL. 

Four more guest stars every week! The 
sure fire success formula for a radio pro- 
gram has at last been discovered. AH you 
have to do is put Lindbergh, Einstein, the 
Dionne Quintet, Greta Garbo, the Chica- 
go Symphony Orchestra, the Metropoli- 
tan Opera, and six comedians on the same 
program. Personally, I like the idea. 
We're getting several times a week the 
kind of shows we used to get a couple of 
times a year at monster benefit shows. 
NBC Thursdays 10:00 P. M., 60 min. 

SISTERS OF THE SKILLET. Eddie 
and Ralph are now in the bodyguard 
business — corsets to you. Too bad tele- 
vision isn't here. They'd be a scream 
giving demonstrations. 

CBS Sundays 1:45 P. M., 15 min. 





NEMO 






■d** 



f^ 



'Your corsets — since you wear 
them next to your skin — need fre- 
quent washings," declares Nemo. 
"Not only to preserve their looks 
and fit, but because perspiration 
when allowed to remain in fine 
corsets actually rots away the 
strength of the fabric!" 

A DANGER. Your corsets are 
made of "live" fabric— need gen- 
tle treatment. Don't make the 
mistake of washing them with hot 
water or a strong soap! Any soap 
less pure than Ivory is apt to 
make the elastic flabby. Use chif- 
fon-thin Ivory Flakes, made of 
pure Ivory Soap — "safe even for 
a baby's skin." 

A PRECAUTION. "If you give 
your corsets Ivory Flakes care you 
can keep them looking as they did 
in the fitting room," promises 
Nemo. "Ivory Flakes are an ab- 
solutely pure soap — they preserve 
the elasticity and fit, prolong the 
life of fine corsets!" 



DO's and DON'Ts in Corset-washing 

DO use lukewarm water and pure Ivory Flakes. 

DON/T use a less-pure soap — it weakens fabrics. 
DO squeeze suds through, using a soft brush on soiled 
spots — Rinse in lukewarm water. 

DON'T rub, wring or twist — it may distort the 

garment 
DO roll in towel and knead to remove excess moisture. 

DON'T allow to remain rolled up. 
DO dry garment away from heat — Press fabric parts 
on wrong side with a moderately warm iron. 

DONT use hot iron — Don't iron elastic. 



FLAKES 






IVORY FLAKES ***•/. ™« 






PROOF BY EVERYDAY PEOPLE HOW 

LISTERINE 
FIGHTS GOLDS 

and 

SORE THROAT 





«Sk ''J^Wr/SK^* .^ e bud" 

f^ * - A mV Co\d ltV , ev identiy 



ONE-HALF AS MANY 

COLDS FOR LISTERINE 

USERS, TESTS SHOW 

Listerine's amazing results against the 

common cold, proved in 1931, 1932 

and 1934 

Are you subject to frequent colds, or trou- 
bled with sore throat? Try gargling with 
Listerine every morning and every night 
for a while. You may find, as scores of 
others have, that this delightful treatment 
is a wonderful aid in warding off these 
troubles. 

People have been telling us that for 
years. Their experience is corroborated by 
careful tests made during the winters of 
1931, 1932 and 1934. Conducted under 
medical supervision, these tests revealed 
this astonishing fact : 

That those who gargled with Listerine twice 
a day or oftener caught cold approximately 
only one-half as often as those who did not 
gargle with it. Moreover, when they did 
catch cold, the colds were mild in comparison 
with those contracted by non-users of Listerine. 

The explanation of Listerine's success 
lies in the fact that when used as a gargle, 
it kills, on mouth and throat surfaces, 
millions of the germs associated with colds 
and ordinary sore throat. 

Get in the habit of using undiluted Lis- 
terine regularly, morning and night. And 
at the first sign of a cold, increase the gargle 
to once every three hours. Lambert 
Pharmacal Company, St. Louis,, Mo. 






\no\eteW keai bad y 

c otnP lc thT oat so lhe 

„ .time I H«<* "eSV, 5 ? &£«* 3 
Almost cor^ otmaC , N» 



10 



All pictures posed by professional models. 

8 



c 



j0, 



Try this now, flner^ 

COUGH DROP 

ends threat tickle 

relieves irritation 

checks coughs 




MRS. LANNY ROSS 



ANSWERS ALL OF 



YOUR QUESTIONS 



REFLECTIONS IN 
THE RADIO MIRROR 



Mrs. Lcmny Ross still calls 
herself Olive White and is 
continuing her career. 



WRITE ME YOUR OPINIONS. PRIZES FOR BEST 



LETTERS ARE ON PAGE FOUR 



EAR FRIENDS: 

Olive White, who still calls herself that even 
though she's Mrs. Lanny Ross, is one of the most 
attractive, energetic and charming women in the radio 
world. And she is certainly the most harassed! 

Where was she born? What sort of 
life has she led? How did her career 
bring her into the life and career of 
Lanny Ross? How do she and her hus- 
band adjust their mutual business and 
personal life? Where do they live? 
What sort of life do they lead now? 
What are their social contacts, their 
recreations, their plans for the future? 
Olive White Ross is being deluged with 
ihese and many other questions. Which 
is understandable. 

AlthQugh they don't intend to have 
gushy, romantic stories written about 
their private life — and rightly so — and 
although at the moment they are mainly 
concerned with the great new plans for 
"Lanny Ross and the Maxwell House 
Show Boat," and the signing up of a 
new "girl" for Lanny Ross (Louise Mas- 
sey) here, first and 
for the last time, 
those questions are 
to be answered! So 
for this brief mo- 
ment let's look be- 
hind the scenes — 
and after that the 
meteoric career of 
Lanny Ross must 
curtain their private 
lives. 

In that little town of Baraboo, Wisconsin, also the birth 
place of the famous Ringling Brothers, a little girl dreamed 
of the exciting career she knew lay before her. Her sister 
and brother, so much older than she, and her widowed 
mother encouraged her successful forays into amateur 
theatricals. But it was not until she stood on the threshold 
of life, on the eve of her graduation from the University of 
Wisconsin, that Olive White made up her mind that she 
was going to become a famous singer! Her mother had 
died that year and, in that sobering tragedy, Olive found 
herself closer than ever to reality. So on her own initiative 
she took the daring step — and went to Paris to study with 
M. Bertram the intricacies of vocal technique. She con- 
tinued her studies in- Chicago and then set out for New 
York to try her luck in the theater. 

A woman friend, aware of the pitfalls of a theatrical 
career, told her: "Give yourself a time limit — and if at the 
end of it you haven't succeeded in what you set out to do. 
change your line!" That's what Olive White did! At the 
end of two years, despite an occasional engagement, she had 
not accomplished what she'd dreamed of — and so she 
changed her line. She went to Chicago, got a job on a 
newspaper, and in a few short months found herself firmly 
entrenched in the maelstrom of theatrical publicity. She 
was managing people like Marion Harris. Phil Baker, and 
the whole troupe of a Shubert musical ! 

She wrote a novel about her work. "Woven Threads." 




which was looked upon with interest by several big pub- 
lishers. But she says it wasn't published because it wasn't 
written well enough! Be that as it may, she had come 
to New York and now devoted herself to the furthering of 
other people's careers, rather than her own. She repre- 
sented a textile designer and an indus- 
trial designer and a young singer who 
was not meeting with any great success 
in his chosen career. His name was 
Launcelot Ross, late of Yale and the 
Columbia Law School! 

In Lanny Ross, Olive White saw the 
same handicaps she had faced. To the 
run-of-the-mill Broadway agent this 
Ross boy seemed too conservative, t<x> 
modest and shy, to fight the Broadway 
battle. And, good Lord, he has a college 
education yet! These "handicaps" Olive 
White turned into advantages. It is 
Lanny's very conservatism, modesty and 
shyness which have made him so be- 
loved today by fans and confreres. And 
the college education — well, when he was 
called upon to learn ninety sides of dia- 
logue for a little theater engagement in 
"Petticoat Fever" 
Lanny's well-trained 
mind enabled him 
to memorize the 
part in two days 
and give a finished, 
intelligent perform- 
ance ten days after 
he'd picked up the 
script. Handicap? 
Not on your life! 
You know what 
happened after that. Olive puts it this way: "Lanny Ross 
and I have worked together for three years and as a natural 
result, much of our leisure time has also been spent to- 
gether — so what happened? Harry Leon Wilson made it 
famous a number of years ago — I became Lanny's best 
friend and severest critic' The only possible conclusion 
was that we were married on Monday, July _29th. by a 
minister in Milbrook, New York." 

During those three years they have worked together, solv- 
ing the intricate problems which a young radio star faces, 
battling the complicated Hollywood set-up, removing 
Lanny from the battle, unscathed, when they saw that he 
wasn't getting the proper vehicles in pictures. And today, 
because of that battle, Lanny can write his own ticket for 
radio, movies or personal appearances! 

What kind of life do they lead? Well, at the moment 
Olive still has her apartment and Lanny has his. But in 
a few weeks they will be settled in a duplex apartment 
overlooking the East River, the apartment with the two- 
story studio room, and the peaceful, quiet atmosphere 
which Olive knows is so important for both of them. For 
you must remember that their business life isn't over at 
five in the afternoon. It continues from the moment they 
arise to the moment they retire. Frequently there are 
business conferences at night, made charming by the gra- 
cious hostessing of Olive and the friendly good fellowship 
of Lanny. And if you wonder how (Continued on page 82) 

9 





From 

8:30 in the morn- 
ing to 10:45 at night, . 
"Time Marches On." That's 
how long it takes to prepare and 
broadcast this sensational program. In 
the scenes enfolded in the arc across these 
pages, from left to right: Bill Geer, chief news editor 
at his desk, sorting the day's events with the aid of his 
able "lieutenants; script rehearsal without the orchestra; Arthur 
Pryor, Jr., the program director; next we see the final assembling 
of the finished scripts one and a half hours before the broadcast goes 
on the air. Finally, dress rehearsal- — a half hour before the broad- 
cast. That's Howard Barlow with the baton. Left, Ted di Corsia is 
the radio voice of Mussolini and opposite page, lower left, Haile 
Selassie, Ethiopia's ruler, with his radio impersonator, Edwin Jerome. 



Photographs made especially for Radio Mirror by Wide World 



EVERY twenty-four hours, as the world turns once 
in its orbit, earth's farthest flung outposts of 
civilization become the 'birth places of one of 
America's most exciting radio programs. A news event, 
springing into being in Addis Ababa, Tokyo, or Moscow, 
speeds along, full born, across cables fathoms deep under 
the Atlantic ocean, under the pavements of New York City, 
into fifteenth-floor rooms of the Columbia Broadcasting 
System building. 

While the city desks of metropolitan newspapers are still 
reading over the latest war bulletins from Ethiopia, the 
newest demand of Mussolini, these life dramas of tumul- 
tuous, nations are being transformed into radio scripts that 
will reach listeners five, three, or even one hour later. 

That is why five-time-a-week March of Time comes 
through your loudspeaker with all the punch, suspense, and 
excitement of an early morning extra; why, listening to 
it, you sit attentively in anticipation. 

This show, unrehearsed in comparison with other, more 
elaborate programs, uses in its battle against the fleeting 
minutes the most modern system of communication any 
GHQ headquarters could devise — one of the world's largest 
syndicate news services, cablegrams from private reporters, 
private wires to a research library, inter-connecting phone 
systems with the radio studio, the program's advertising 
agency, the studio's control room. 

In order to paint the vivid picture of the conception and 
10 



delivery of a March of Time, it is necessary to step into 
those rooms on the fifteenth floor of the CBS building. The 
time is 8:30 in the morning. 

Since last night's program ended at a quarter to eleven, 
news reports have been ticking in on a teletypewriter, a 
heavy, glass-enclosed machine that automatically types out 
on long sheets of paper stories that are being cabled in 
from every important capital in the world. 

Five lieutenants, their general, and his secretary gather 
about the machine, pick up the sheets, and adjourn to the 
general's private office. On his desk are piled the morning 
editions of New York's many newspapers. The general is 
Bill Geer, tall, blond, a writer since 1929 for the magazine 
that sponsors the program. The lieutenants are experienced 
script men hired exclusively for the show. 

For an hour the news is sorted. Then the general — by 
now in shirt sleeves — issues his orders. The five best 
stories have been selected. Each script man gets his assign- 
ment, goes out into the outer room, uncovers his typewriter, 
and begins the job of turning the story into a dramatic skit 
suitable for radio presentation. 

For the rest of the morning general Geer is in constant 
telephonic communication with the research library of his 
magazine, checking the names, dates, and background of 
the stories he hopes will be used on the night's program. As 
each new fact is uncovered, his secretary rushes it to the 
five lieutenants who incorporate (Continued on page 8i) 



BEHIND THE SCENES OF ONE OF AMERICA'S MOST EXCITING RADIO 
PROGRAMS, THE FIVE-TIME-A-WEEK NEWS EVENTS WHICH 



COME TO YOU LIKE AN EARLY MORNING EXTRA! 



By FRED 
RUTLEDGE 



For the March of 
Time, sponsored 
by Time Maga- 
zine and Rem- 
ington Rand, 
see page 53 — 
70 o'clock col. 











*z> 



v_ 



.*>. 



' 



rn 



J s 



f 



RADIO MIRROR 

Proudly Presents 

CURTIS 
MITCHELL 

Well known writer, editor 
and friend of radio per- 
sonalities, in a fascinating 
series of articles beginning 
with — 





ALEUT 



ATVD 




OFF-HAND, I'd say the average radio star is made 
up of two parts sheer talent, three parts grit, four 
parts peacock, and five parts jitters. They vary 
according to their stamping grounds, of course, running to 
higher proportions of peacock especially in New York and 
Hollywood. Wherever you find them, though, there are two 
things you can't get away from — talent and jitters. 

It's funny, but a surprising number of my friendships 
with people who make their living broadcasting came about 
as a result of those jitters, as a result of my happening 
along with a blow-torch just when their nerves had turned 
theif bodies into sticks of dynamite. 

The first one who blew up — all over me, by the way — 
was the Singing Lady. The second was a red-eyed threat 
to my life and limb named Rudy Vallee. The third was a 
blonde with curls clear down to here who was facing some- 
thing of a crisis when I butted in. That's how I came to 
know Jessica Dragonette. 

The Singing Lady thing was a mistake, pure and simple. 
But how was Ireene Wicker to know that way out in Chi- 
cago? You see, I was the bright boy de- 
tective who had discovered who the 
Singing Lady actually was. It was a 
great mystery in those days. The men- 
tion of her name brought "sush-sushings" 
down around my ears in every studio I 
visited until the day one undisciplined 



Don't you 
dare,' I ad- 
vised. Next 
day Jessica 
Dragonette 
cut her hair." 



THOSE HIDDEN MOMENTS IN THE LIVES OF THE STARS 



"% %. ** 1* j 



"Rudy Vallee 
didn't like the 
story. He didn't 
like me. . . . Later, 
I watched him 
while he struggled 
with the decision 
that put his whole 
future in perill" 



employee inadvertently told me the Singing Lady's real 
name. I rushed it into print, scooping the opposition, 
scooping the world. I even scooped the Singing Lady her- 
self. 

I wrote, "The Singing Lady's real name is Edna Kellogg." 
Remember Edna? A grand singer, but certainly and posi- 
tively not the Singing Lady. 

The first intimation of disaster came through the mail, 
a letter from the company that employed the young lady 
in question. Then a shower of cards from folk who knew 
better, who had listened to Miss Wicker for months. Then 
a gentleman with an evil eye who announced himself as 
the Singing Lady's lawyer, and asked just what I was going 
to do about repairing the damage I had done his client's 
reputation. Finally, 1 met the Singing Lady herself. 

It was at a big party that Ben Bernie gave. Amos 'n' 
Andy were there. So was Sophie Tucker. Little Jackie 
Heller had just finished singing his heart out when Ben 
called a slim, quick-moving girl to the piano. He intro- 
duced her as Ireene Wicker, the Singing Lady. Later, as 
she passed my table, a mutual friend stopped her. 

"Ireene," he said, eyeing me. "This is the guy who . . ." 

I rose, ready to duck. I'd heard she was fit to be tied. 
She'd sent a lawyer my way, remember. 

She held out her hand and smiled, "Let's let bygones be 
bygones," she said. You could have knocked me over with 
a powder puff. 

You get to know people when you scrap with them. We 
didn't scrap after that but the start I'd got helped me to 
know Ireene Wicker, and the more I knew her the more I 
understood why she was able to tell ten million kids what 
to eat and make 'em eat it. 

One night I saw her go upstairs at six o'clock with two 
little girls, age four and seven. My little girls, to be exact. 
And she stayed upstairs for three solid hours telling such 
tales as those youngsters had never heard before and 
probaby will never hear again. While the rest of us played 
bridge, she was talking two kids into slumberland, and 
having more fun doing it than anyone else in the house. 
No wonder children love her. 

Just recently, I rode in the new car that is the apple of 
her eye. It is a big car, the finest made in America. She 




"You get to 
know people 
when you 
scrap with 
them." That's 
how Curtis 
Mitchell got 
to know Ireene 
Wicker and 
her husbandl 



and her husband, the same Walter Wicker who produces and 
acts in Today's Children, had saved their money scrupu- 
lously for months on end. They promised each other they 
were going to buy a paid-up life insurance policy, until they 
saw the car and bought it; the longest, blackest, shiniest car 
in Chicago. 

Just a week later they were driving home from a week- 
end in Wisconsin. The day was foggy. In the middle of 
a narrow bridge a joy-riding vacationist roared down on 
them, swerved, and ripped off two brand new fenders and 
a running board. The Singing Lady's voice wasn't quite 
so steady when she told her stories that night. 

Even then the lightning that never or almost never 
strikes twice hadn't finished with her. She was parked at 
the curb, the car all newly repaired and painted. A moon- 
mad driver careened out of the road and plowed straight 
through her new car's fear bumper and trunk. He was vejy 
apologetic and the car was insured, fortunately, but even 
now when you remind her of that night a certain ominous 
light rises in her eyes that bodes no good for the next Sun- 
day driver who practices on her automobile. 

Rudy Vallee's jitters are usually kept under the com- 
plete control of his iron-like will. (Continued on page 66) 



REVEALED BY THE ONLY MAN WHO KNOWS ABOUT THEM! 



13 



-£fe 



.# 



IF 






"Hi 








. —~ a Kin 



lOT U^L^HAVETH _ ^ 

ocfM TOtD. v/ ^ 
THIS GLAMOROUS STAR rthA|(AAW D--AMD VET- 









IniBk 






By CAROLINE SOMERS HOYT 



THIS is the amazing story of a girl who could have 
jumped overnight from an obscure cafe where she 
sang for her dinners into the lap of blue blooded 
society and, instead, decided in favor of a career that held 
only the slightest glimmer of promise. 

Three times Grace Moore was asked to accept in marriage 
rich, handsome men whose position commanded servants, 
diamonds, yachts — and each time she said no to pin her 
hopes on her young, untrained voice. 

But when, not long ago, royal equerries left a crested in- 
vitation to tea with Queen Mary of England, this same 
girl who had refused wealth and luxury through a hus- 
band's name stood in the hallway of social fame, 
accepted and applauded by the same people 
who would have scorned her short years 
ago. 
. These untold chapters which have 
hidden the tremendous courage 
and belief in herself that helped 
Grace Moore prefer musical 
comedy to overwhelmingly rich 
young bachelors, began to un- 
fold in New York's garish 
Greenwich Village. 

Grace had come to New 
York to seek her fortune 
with nothing more substan- 
tial than a $25 a month al- 
lowance, all her army officer 
father could afford to send. 
Together with another equally 
poor and aspiring girl, she was 
living in a tiny one-room walk-up 
apartment. To make sure that she 
would eat every night, Grace sang in 
the Black Cat restaurant, a typical Village 
meeting place. 

That is how it happened that one night Thomas 
Markoe Robertson heard Grace Moore, sat at a 
table in the dimly lit Black Cat and drank in the 
slim figure outlined on the floor by the flickering 
lights, took in the enchanting beauty of her face. 
Grace never dreamed while singing to her audience 
that listening, engrossed, was one of Park Avenue's 
most sought after men. 

She didn't know it until Robertson spoke a brief 



For Grace Moore's program, sponsored by the Vick 
Chemical Company, see page 56 — 9 o'clock column. 



word to the proprietor and an introduction was arranged. 
Young, eager, hopeful, she accepted his friendship with a 
thrill she couldn't quite hide. From that night on, Robert- 
son forsook his uptown clubs and his socialite kinsmen to 
drive down to the narrow side street off lower Seventh 
Avenue which boasted the Black Cat. 

Grace, going home after work at night to crawl into the 
hard, narrow bed in the cramped apartment, dreamed over 
the things Robertson had promised her. He had spoken of 
Europe, of a honeymoon trip around the world, of his 
country estate on Long Island. (Continued on page 74) 

When Queen Mary of England invited Grace to "tea for 
two," society gasped. George Biddle, wealthy socialite, 
below, urged an elopement, but Grace preferred a career. 
Prince San Faustino, lower left, offered Grace one of 
the oldest Italian titles. Lower right, Thomas Markoe 
Robertson, whose wealth and position Grace also refused. 



Acme photos 




WILL WAR GUMS 



1^0 statement made in these articles on the amazing part 
radio will play in the events of war, European or 
otherwise, is intended to reflect upon the courage or honor 
of any nation, broadcasting organisation or individual. 
Much of this hitherto unrevealed information is based on 
statements made privately by officials on the inside of gov- 
ernmental and military affairs, who were endeavoring to 
cooperate with the author in creating as complete a picture 
as possible. The names of nations are used only to make 
this picture clearer to the reader, not to suggest that they 
would necessarily undertake actions ascribed to them here. 
— Editor. 

IF WAR comes. . . . 
Your radio set may crackle and roar with the brawl- 
ings of battle as tense, gray-faced announcers of the 
front line rap out reports of combats. 

The most innocent-sounding programs may conceal 
coded messages of hostile spies. 

Your loudspeaker may suddenly turn into a demoniacal 
chanter of enemy propaganda. 

And if that happens, your favorite stations may be dom- 



inated by stern censors, may even suddenly become silent, 
as grimly silent as the death which is hovering over the 
battlefields. 

In a desperate extremity, even your receiving set might 
be seized by determined troops. 

Even as this is being written. National Broadcasting 
Company executives are gravely disturbed over reports 
that the rebroadcasts from Addis Ababa have been deliber- 
ately interfered with by an unfriendly nation. A respon- 
sible spokesman unofficially denied that it occurred in these 
particular cases, but he did admit that it was regarded as a 
factor to contend with in future broadcasts. That is one 
more indication of the turmoil which war guns could create 
in the radio world. 

Every one of these things can happen. Don't think for 
a moment that they can't. How many of them will happen 
depends upon how deeply war thrusts at us. You hope that 
we can stay out of it. But war dogs are growling overseas, 
and whether we remain sturdy neutrals or go in fighting 
with everything we have, armed conflict stands to make al- 
most unbelievable changes in the radio we know today. 

Suppose a fierce battle is taking place on the Italo- 



li 






vv* 




■ 



i 










j"2\ >;. */!?& 




■ 4> ^m ' 
■ ^^^» ^L.^ «^^fc 




^Pl 


fe&*_~?*S^^^ 


■tr 




<9& 









SILENCE 
RADIO? 



THIS STARTLING EXPOSE OF SECRET 
GOVERNMENT AND MILITARY PLANS 
FOR RADIO IN WAR-TIME IS OF VAST 
SIGNIFICANCE TO EVERY AMERICAN ! 



F-thiopian front. You hate the horror and futility of war. 
yet you are eager for news, you must know how the tide is 
turning. You go to your radio and snap it on. 

Bickerings of spiteful machine guns, bellowings of heavy 
artillery leap at you from your loudspeaker. Through the 
mad hurly-burly of battle noises whips the strained voice 
of a front line radio announcer. 

*'.... Italians swinging into a general advance all along 
this sector. The main body of Ethiopian troops have been 
routed here and only scattered handfuls of hurrying 
snipers are remaining in position of vantage. . . . Wait! 
Over on the hill about a half mile to my left, the black 
troops are reforming for a counter maneuver. ... Just a 
moment. . . . Hear that? Well-directed machine gun fire 
has broken up the reorganization even as it began and 
the Ethiopians are retreating hastily. . . ." 

If broadcasts are to be made from the Italian front lines, 
that's the sort of thing you might expect to hear. Naturally. 
Italian commanders would not permit news of their own 
defeats or setbacks to be sent out. And no suggestion of 

the horror of war would be 
allowed to creep in. 

Thus in the safety of 
your own country, in the 
comfort of your own home, 
you may be able to hear 




fascinating reports of the thrilling side of war — after the 
disagreeable part has been removed. 

But what about the radio war correspondent over there? 
He faces probably more dangers than the average infan- 
tryman. Why? 

Let's get into the front line with one of these announ- 
cers and share these thrills and dangers with him. 

A thin first line of Italian soldiers, lying in shallow, 
hastily-dug trenches, is a scant hundred feet in front of us 
Like many of them, we are taking shelter, inadequate at 
best, behind the jagged boulders of the hilly sandy terrain 
After the first hundred or so bullets have ricocheted from 
the other side of the rock and gone whining away, we see 
the uselessness of ducking, but we're still uncomfortably 
aware of our peril. 

Crouching beside us is the announcer, the engineer obser- 
ver, and an Italian army officer. The last named is with us 
to see that we don't broadcast any information which 
would aid the enemy in planning surprise attacks. We hope 
it is true that the Ethiopians are ill-equipped with radio 
direction finders and artillery. It wouldn't take long for a 
direction finder to locate our broadcasting position and 
less time than that for the enemy to train guns on us. 
Since the information being broadcast is necessarily favor- 
able to the Italian cause, the enemy will gleefully welcome 
any opportunity to wipe us out. 



BY JEAN 
PELLETIER 



Crouched in the first line 
trench are the announcer, 
carrying pack transmitter 
and wearing a gas-mask 
microphone, and the en- 
gineer-observer, field 
glasses in hand, with re- 
ceiving apparatus. 



ILLUSTRATED 



B y 



CARL 



LINK 

17 



_;. 



WILL WAR GUNS 



N c 



TO statement made in these articles on the amartng part 
radio will play in the events of war, European or 
otherwise, is intended to reflect upon the courage or honor 
oj any nation, broadcasting organiiation or individual. 
Much of this hitherto unrevealed information is based on 
statements made privately by officials on the inside of gov- 
ernmental and military affairs, who were endeavoring to 
cooperate with the author in creating as complete a picture 
as possible. The names of nations are used only to make 
this picture clearer to the reader, not to suggest that they 
would necessarily undertake actions ascribed to them here. 
Editor. 

IF WAR comes. . . . 
Your radio set may crackle and roar with the brawl- 
ing Of battle as tense, gray-faced announcers of the 
front line rap out reports of combats. 

I he most innocent-sounding programs may conceal 
coded messages ol hostile spies. 

Your loudspeaker may suddenly lurn into a demoniacal 
chanter of enemy propaganda. 

\nd if thai happens, vour favorite stations may be dom- 



inated by stern censors, may even suddenly become silent, 
as grimly silent as the death which is hovering over the 
battlefields. 

In a desperate extremity, even your receiving set might 
be seized bv determined troops. 

Even as this is being written. National Broadcasting 
Company executives are gravely disturbed over reports 
that the rebroadcasts from Addis Ababa have been deliber- 
ately interfered with by an unfriendly nation. A respon- 
sible spokesman unofficially denied that it occurred in these 
particular cases, but he did admit that it was regarded as a 
factor to contend with in future broadcasts. That is one 
more indication of the turmoil which war guns could create 
in the radio world. 

Every one of these things can happen. Don't think for 
a moment that they can't, flow many of them will happen 
depends upon how deeply war thrusts at us. You hope that 
we can stay out of it. But war dogs are growling overseas, 
and whether we remain sturdy neutrals or go in fighting 
with everything we have, armed conflict stands to make al- 
most unbelievable changes in the radio we know today. 
Suppose a fierce battle is taking place on the Italo- 



Q¥¥ plVIPP ™ IS STAR TLING EXPOSE OF SECRET 

RADIO? 



Ethiopian front. You hate the horror and futility of war. 
yet you are eager for news, you must know how the tide is 
turning. You go to your radio and snap it on. 

Bickerings of spiteful machine guns, bellowings of heavy 
artillery leap at you from your loudspeaker. Through the 
mad hurly-burly of battle noises whips the strained voice 
of a front line radio announcer. 

"... Italians swinging into a general advance all along' 
this sector. The main body of Ethiopian troops have b^en 
routed here and only scattered handfuls of hurrying 
snipers are remaining in position of vantage. . . Wait' 
Over on the hill about a half mile to my left, the black 
troops are reforming for a counter maneuver. ... Just a 
moment. . . . Hear that? Well-directed machine gun fire 
has broken up the reorganization even as it began and 
the Ethiopians are retreating hastily. . . ." 

If broadcasts are to be made from the Italian front lines, 
that's the sort of thing you might expect to hear. Naturally' 
Italian commanders would not permit news of their own 
defeats or setbacks to be sent out. And no suggestion of 
the horror of war would be 
allowed to creep in. 

Thus in the safety of 
your own country, in the 
comfort of your own home, 
you may be able to hear 




GOVERNMENT AND MILITARY PLANS 
FOR RADIO IN WAR-TIME IS OF VAST 
SIGNIFICANCE TO EVERY AMERICAN! 

dSSLTTt^K* 1 " thrilling side of war - after ^ 

disagreeable part has been removed 

He fal h nrnh ^ "* "*? War corres P°ndent over there? 

cerflnd 86 !; ^V 1 * ^, " ne with one of these announ- 
cers and share these thrills and dangers with him 

hasrilv h" /' 'I"' ° f ,talia " S0ldiers ' 'ying in sl ««°w, 
hastily-dug trenches, is a scant hundred feet in front of us 

k , ^t"^ °[ them ' We are takin 8 belter, inadequate at 
best, behind the jagged boulders of the hilly sandy terrain 
After the first hundred or so bullets have ricocheted from 
the other side of the rock and gone whining away we see 
the uselessness of ducking, but we're still uncomfortably 
aware of our peril. 

Crouching beside us is the announcer, the engineer obser- 
ver, and an Italian army officer. The last named is with us 
to see that we don't broadcast any information which 
would aid the enemy in planning surprise attacks. We hope 
it is true that the Ethiopians are ill-equipped with radio 
direction finders and artillery. It wouldn't take long for a 
direction finder to locate our broadcasting position and 
less time than that for the enemy to train guns on us. 
Since the information being broadcast is necessarily favor- 
able to the Italian cause, the enemy will gleefully welcome 
any opportunity to wipe us out. 



BY JEAN 
PELLETIER 



Crouched in the first line 
trench are the announcer, 
carrying pack transmitter 
and wearing a gas-mask 
microphone, and the en- 
gineer-observer, field 
glasses in hand, with re- 
ceiving apparatus. 



E D 



b y 



CARL 



LINK 

17 



A dispatch runner, ducking and dodging from boulder to 
boulder, comes alongside us and, dropping out of the line 
of fire, breathlessly informs the Italian officer that an en- 
emy shrapnel-throwing battery has been spotted. It's ready 
to go into action. We're ordered to keep that information 
off the air, not to give any hint that we know of its exis- 
tence. 

None the less, the bat- 
tery opens up almost im- 
mediately from behind 
the brow of a hill. Hot 
fragments of steel start 
raining all around as the 
Italian infantry rises out 
of the ground and moves 
forward, seeking shelter 
where it can. The enemy 
battery seems to be way 
off range. The Italians 
are dropping only here 
and there, though the 
storm of deathly shrapnel 
about us is still heavy. 

Suddenly the liaison of- 
ficer screams above the 
din. "They're shelling us. 
Trying to wipe us . . ." 

A sudden blast, so close that it 
seems to turn blood into molten steel. 
Particles of sand lash our faces. The 
cloud of dust and smoke drifts away. 
The officer is lying face down, mo- 
tionless. Clasping his side, the an- 
nouncer slowly folds up like a slide 
rule and is still. 

Horror-stricken, we gaze at the 
bodies for a long moment, then the 
observer snatches up the blood- 
stained gas-mask microphone. Carry 
on. 

A figment of imagination? Not at 
all. That's a big, solid chunk of pre- 
determined probability, based on the 
experience of National Broadcasting 
Company announcers, engineers and 
observers in their broadcasts under 
simulated war conditions at the re- 
cent great Army maneuvers at Pine 
Camp, New York, and upon the opin- 
ions of the military experts who pri- 
vately confided their views to me. 

In these Pine Camp maneuvers, one 
radio observer was "killed" nine 
times, five during an actual broad- 
cast. In another position, George 
Hicks, announcer; an engineer, and an 
observer, all concealed with a ma- 
chine gun squad, were "wiped out," 
as was Dan Russel, announcer, and 
two engineers with a mobile trans- 
mitter unit. The military umpires 
ruled also that Nelson Case, another 
announcer, and two engineers, were 
"wounded and injured." 

All this happened on a front of a 
few miles during but two broadcasts. 
Think what might happen to these 
men in actual engagements. Yet it is 
not improbable that such broadcasts 
will be made from the front. John 
Royal, vice-president of the Nationa 
Broadcasting Company, returning 
Irom a tour of Europe recently, ad- 

18 



mitted that he was considering covering the war in Ethiopia 
by radio. And war stimulates inventiveness to such an ex- 
tent that a solution may be found for broadcasting from 
the front with less danger to the participants. 

But whether or not such broadcasts, with possible sacri- 
fice of life, are worthwhile is not the important question. 

It's the matter of how 
♦ they might imperil our 
peace and security and 
through that our privi- 
leges as listeners, which 
we're worried about. By 
showing you how such 
broadcasts can be accom- 
plished, I can reveal to 
you the part that unfair 
censorship and vicious 
propaganda could play — 
things which would affect 
us directly as citizens and 
listeners. 

But first, there's an- 
other use to which radio 
might be put in time of 
war,' about which you 
should know. You should 
know because it's a dan- 
gerous, insidious use, close 
to home, difficult to de- 
tect. 

It concerns the secret 
use of our broadcasting 
stations by spies, by un- 
friendly agents of foreign 
nations at war. And I 
should, say right now, that 
if this were a pipe dream, 
our Army Intelligence 
service wouldn't have con- 
ceived plans for dealing 
with such activities. 

Most of us would prob- 
ably never know such spy 
activities were ever going 
on. But let's assume 
you're a consistent, intelli- 
gent listener who doesn't 
mind trying his hand at a 
little amateur detecting 
for the United States 
Government. 

Now you know we're 
neutral, but you're not so 
foolish as to think there 
aren't certain sly men and 
(Continued on page 86) 




Left, the NBC page dis- 
plays a transmitter of the 
type which will be in use 
for front-line broadcast- 
ing in the event of war. 
Above, George Hicks, 
NBC announcer, and his 
engineer-observer were 
wiped out during a sham 
attack which was part of 
the Army maneuvers held 
at Pine Camp, New York. 






..«*!>*.■ 




DO YOU KNOW 
JACK BENNY'S NEW 
TENOR COMEDI- 
AN? YOU SHOULD 
BECAUSE HE'S HOL- 
LyWOOD'S AND 
RADIO'S LATEST 
SINGING FIND! 



MICHEL 




jf Michael can well smile after 

M astonishing the world with his 

grand performance in pictures, 

and now he's on the Jello hour, 

see page 56—7 o'clock column. 

WUHT 



By 

DAN WARREN 






YOU should know Michael Bartlett. 
Because he's the new tenor-comedian on the Jack 
Benny Sunday night radio programs. 

Because he's Hollywood's newest, most exciting discovery 
who sang opposite Grace Moore in "Love Me Forever," 
who takes a prominent part in Claudette Colbert's "She 
Married Her Boss," and who is scheduled as Miss Moore's 
leading man in her next picture. 

By rights Michael Bartlett today should be living in 
Massachusetts, a staid officer in a staid manufacturing com- 
pany. His background of prominent New England an- 
cestry called for that, but Michael had different ideas. 

It all started his freshman year at Princeton, when he 
became one of the distinguished few to join the Triangle 
Club which has made itself famous lately by producing 
two songs: "Love and a Dime" and "East of the Sun and 
West of the Moon." 

"That," Bartlett explained, "was my first taste of the 
stage and I vowed that it wouldn't be the last. The thrill 
of going on the road with the production sold me on the 
theater as a career. All day on the train we'd sit around 
in pajamas playing bridge and get dressed just in time to 



Columbia Pieties 



get off the pullman and around to the theater before the 
curtain went up." 

He also learned that year how much freshmen can be 
imposed upon by seniors. He was the tenor of a trio and 
every night when the three walked out into the spotlight, 
it was his job to hold up his two companions. People might 
otherwise have thought they'd all been indulging. 

For awhile it looked just as easy as that — he'd decided 
on the theater as his career, so the theater it would be. 
Then complications arose. First his father objected and 
tried, by cutting his allowance, to dissuade his son. Michael 
overcame that by hiring himself out as a choir singer in a 
church on 114th street in Manhattan. Salary, $80 a month. 
After that, his father admitted defeat and sent him abroad 
to continue his studies. 

He's stubborn, this six-foot young man who looks like 
a new Englander softened by contact with the more vola- 
tile, sunny disposition of the Latin races. His family was 
the first to find this out. Broadway producers were the 
second. 

After a few years in Italy as a student and later as a full 
fledged opera singer under the name of Eduardo Bartelli, 
Michael returned home. "To be best man at a friend's 
wedding." And he's stayed here ever since. He talks now 
with a gesture of hand and (Continued on page 63) 

19 











%y 



/ 






Ray Lee Jackson 



PUBLIC 

THE BANNS' 



By MARY JACOBS 



For Dangerous Para- 
dise, sponsored by 
Woodbury's, see page 
56 —7 o'clock column. 



how you and you and you DE- 



INCE 1933 you have been listening 
to the Dangerous Paradise sketches. 
You have followed the romance of 
Gail Brewster (Elsie Hitz), the young 
newspaper writer, and Dan Gentry (Nick 
Dawson). Through thick and thin these 
two have clung together, and awhile ago 
they decided to get married. Yes, even 
with Dan out of work. 

They were in Europe, ready to take the 
leap. 

Love had triumphed and every one was 
satisfied. That is, every one but their ar- 
dent fans. Letters, telegrams, phone calls 
poured into the NBC studios from thou- 
sands of fans. All contained the same 
plea: Don't have Gail and Dan marry. 
Please let their romance continue. 

Plans for the radio wedding had pro- 
gressed to such a point that the bride had 
purchased her wedding gown: a lovely, 
clingy white crepe, such as you and 1 
dream of. The bridegroom was all set, 
too. 

Jimmie Melton agreed to act as best 
man for the make-believe radio wedding. 
And lovely Bernice Claire went out shop- 
ping for her bridesmaid's dress. 

Dan and Gail had their wedding picture 
taken, several of them, in fact, to send to 
you and me. 

But because of you and you and you, 
Gail and Dan haven't married — and 
won't, at least for a long time. So fervent 
were your pleas that the men behind the 
scenes changed the script completely. 
They had Dan become ill of amnesia. So 
the wedding had to be called off, indefi- 
nitely. 
You and you and you forbade the banns, prevented a 
wedding's taking place! 

If you are ever tempted to think, "Oh, my opinion 
doesn't count. Those radio stars pay no attention to what 
I want or write," just remember: It was you who stopped 
this wedding. It was you who dictated what was to happen 
in the lives of that charming, adventuresome couple, Gail 
Brewster and Dan Gentry. 



CREED THAT THE MARRIAGE OF DAN TO GAIL 
. OF "DANGEROUS PARADISE" WAS NOT TO BE! 

20 



See, it's a shamel What a lovely 
bride Gail Brewster would have 
made — and, look at Dan, he was all 
set tor the wedding march, too! 




Left, by winning a WBBM 
unknown singer contest last 
spring, Vivian della Chiesa 
became a successful profes- 
sional overnight. This fall, 
at the ripe age of nineteen, 
she has her own program on 
Sundays, over CBS, at 12:30, 
and she's sponsored, too. 



HOLLYWOOD 

HOTELS 

GORIN 



Above, the man you probably referred to last winter for news 
about the Hauptmann trial. Until this fall he was a Mutual Net- 
work commentator. Now NBC has him, sponsored, Saturdays 
and Sundays at 5:45. Gabriel Heatter is a native New Yorker, 
veteran newspaperman, editor of a steel magazine, and author 
of several books . . . Above, right, the newest Hollywood Hotel 
baritone, Igor Gorin, who is also M-G-M's newest foreign impor- 
tation. Igor was born in Odessa, which is in Ukrania, was raised 
in Vienna, educated himself musically by earning money teaching 
languages. Was a star in Czech opera at twenty-two. Is still 
single and spends his spare time working on musical compositions. 
He's tall, has dark brown hair, gray eyes . . . Right, this is the gal 
you hear Monday nights over NBC in Evening-n'n Paris. Odette 
Myrtil is really French, lives on Long Island with her husband, has 
risen to fame on her abilities as an orchestra leader, violin and 
vocal soloist. Radio corralled her from the stage, where she 
scored in "The Countess Maritza" and "The Cat and the Fiddle." 




/ 




COLLEGE PROM SYNCOPATORS 






THE 

LULLABY 

LADY 




Above, Russell Crowell, George Bacon, and Jack Wilcher, respectively, 
the Red Nichols trio. All are natives of Kansas City, Mo. Russ was 
an auditor, George an oil field worker, Jack a railroad man, until Red 
discovered them. They all wear same color suits, all hate bridge and 
love swimming, all are married .-. . Margaret Gent (left), of the Carna- 
tion Contented Hour, was born in Worthington, Minnesota, studied 
music in Minneapolis and at Northwestern University. She's married 
and has a ten-year-old son, Andrew. Boasts a swell game of golf . . . 
Left below, the comic heard with Harv and Esther on Thurs- 
day nights at 8:00. Teddy Bergman has been a confirmed 
pessimist since his grammar school days, when, as "Shylock," 
he caught his beard in a stage door. 28 years old, he has 
been in stock, manufactured candy, taught Roxy the game 
of handball, and now is celebrating radio stardom . . . 
Below, Samuel Curtis, the New Englander who brings to an 
interested radio audience every Monday afternoon at 4:45, 
over WEEI, technical discussions of various radio problems. 
He's been doing this on the air since 1926 and was the first 
Chief Operator of first radio station (WNAC) in Boston. 



m 



HARVESTERS TEDDY BERGMAN 




THE 



RADIOS VETERANS— MYRT AND MARGE 



Above, Myrt and Marge returning from Hawaii, ready to resume 
their radio work this fall after their annual summer vacation. 
You can expect to hear hula music and the swish of grass 
skirts before long . . . Right, a young gal from the deep South, 
starring vocalist over Nashville's powerful local station, WSM. 
She has her own show and sings on another with a trio every 
week . . . Below right, Agnes Moorehead, who has done such 
excellent work with the Andy Gump program. Agnes, born in 
Boston, was brought up in St. Louis, Mo. She holds diplomas 
from Muskingum College, the University of Wisconsin, and the 
American Academy of Dramatic Arts. A minister's daughter, 
she first studied music, made her debut with the Municipal Opera 
in St. Louis, and has been on the Broadway stage . . . Below, 
Harry Kogen, who is responsible for the music on Monday night's 
Greater Sinclair Minstrels. He was born in Chicago and has 
stayed right there ever since, except for a brief army career 
and two years of study in New York. Has rounded out over six 
years' service with NBC, is married, has two sons for whom he's 
planning musical careers, and is a popular composer to boot. 





DIRECTOR HARRY KOGEN 



AGNES MOOREHEAD— THE MIN OF "OH MINT 



>$ E 4^ 



?*Wfc$ 




SHE'S tall, slim, golden 
haired and blue eyed, and 
you hear her every Tues- 
day and Thursday night on 
the Camel Caravan. (See Page 53, 
9 o'clock column). She didn't even 
finish high school, she's never taken 
a single singing lesson, and no one 
else in her family was ever on the 
stage. 

Proving that for young dreamers of star- 
dom radio is still the wonderful fairyland of 
dreams come true, no matter how ambitious the dream. 

Deane Janis began acting as soon as she could talk and 
walk. She learned to play the piano so she could under- 
stand the songs she hummed all day long. In school she 
wangled her way into every dramatic presentation her class 
produced. 

Aside from such slight labors, success has been easy for 
Walter O'Keefe's young singer of the blues, so easy in 
fact that when this interviewer called on her late in Sep- 
tember she was saluting the world with her fingers crossed! 

This is how easy it's been: a little more than three years 
ago she made her first trip from her home in Omaha to the 
big city — Chicago — to visit her aunt. Someone suggested 
she audition for radio. She did, sang once on a small sub- 
urban station, and was signed by the Music Corporation of 
America to sing in the Blackhawk Cafe with Hal Kemp. 

The date was October 1st. Two years later, after six- 
24 



SHE'S THE NEW 



SINGING LASS 



ON THE WALTER 



O'KEEFE SHOW 



teen continuous months of per- 
forming in the famous night club 
and a few months of recuperation in 
California, she made her New York de- 
but, still with Kemp. The date — October 1st. 
This fall, after twelve more months, she began her 
first sponsored radio program. Date? The same. 

Deane had no family objections, either, to overcome when 
she started out. Though she was in Chicago for the first 
time, though her schooling wasn't over, her mother only 
wrote her to go ahead and make good. "She always had a 
secret passion herself for the stage. The least she could do 
was to take it out through me." 

Now Deane is on the road to radio stardom after win- 
ning a series of competitive auditions — and even those were 
made easy for her. Eighty girls had entered in competition 
for the Camel show. The sponsors decided on a strenuous 
elimination contest, with about eighteen judges casting bal- 
lots on each singer. Each day fifteen less would be called 
back. And Deane didn't know it was an elimination con- 
test until it was all over and she'd been declared the winner. 
Now she's afraid her luck may break. Someone may talk 
her into taking lessons and spoil it all! 






KICKED UPSTAIRS/ 




By RUTH GERI 



IF you'd been kicked out of four schools for backward- 
ness, spent three years as the butt of all the crude 
practical jokes the reportorial staff of a tabloid news- 
paper could devise and then, in a desperate effort to achieve 
that goal of all newspaper men — "to get out of the game" 
— had landed a radio job only to be kicked out of that, too, 
wouldn't you be so punch-drunk, figuratively, that you'd 
be pretty nearly willing to settle back into a life of un- 
obtrusive mediocrity? 

All those reverses only brought out the racial charac- 
teristic of bull-dog pertinacity in Boake Carter, the Colum- 
bia Broadcasting System's news editorialist who, unknown 
to the nationwide audience three years ago, has experienced 
one of the swiftest rises to radio prominence of any star in 
his field. 

Carter's radio debut was reminiscent of that surprising 
fellow in the advertisements who sat down to play the 
piano. They laughed when he got up before the microphone. 
Carter's fellow newshawks on the Philadelphia tabloid 
newspaper, where he worked as a re-write man, made him 
a never-failing source of amusement as a target for some- 
what broad humor. It all began when he first went to 
work and one of the bright young men told him that the 
Germans had painted jokes on the sides of their battle- 
ships during the late war. Carter looked nonplussed. "So 
the British couldn't see 'em," the bright young man ex- 
plained. Carter, with typical British phlegm, regarded the 
"ribber" with unchanging, somewhat puzzled expression. 
'But the Germans didn't paint jokes on the sides of their 
battleships," he countered finally, and the roar of laughter 






For Boake Carter, 
the voice of Philco 
Radio, see page 53 
— 7 o'clock column. 



that ensued was his unofficial but none the less unanimous 
nomination as the office end man. 

That is why they laughed when they heard that Harold 
(his name is Harold T. H. Carter; the "Boake" was adopted 
for broadcasting purposes) had written a radio comedy 
script, and would put it on over a local Philadelphia sta- 
tion. 

"Sir Percival Postlethwaite at the Ball Game" was the 
name of that first script, Editorialist Carter's debut on the 
air, and those who heard it agree that when the airwaves 
gained a forceful editorialist, they lost a laugh-provoking 
comedian. In theatrical parlance. "Sir Percival Postle- 
thwaite at the Ball Game" literally "wowed 'em." So popu- 
lar did it prove with the audience {Continued on page 88) 

25 




Husband Sidney 
Brokaw, Ozzie 
Nelson's first vio- 
linist, is in per- 
fect accord with 
Martha's ideas. 



HOW 

MART 
IS MING 










MOTHtRHOOU 



WITH bitter memories of her own lonely child- 
hood without either father or mother still fresh 
in her mind, Martha Mears has been facing a 
universal problem that has implications for every young 
mother in the world. A son, Edward Allen, was born to 
the petite blonde singing star of Kitchen House Party the 
last week of August and it was up to Martha to decide 
whether she would continue her career. 

"Perhaps most mothers would think that having children 
is a full-time job in itself. But 1 disagree. I'm going to 
keep on working. I sang right up to the day my child was 
born, on August 30th, and I'm going back on the air again 
the last of September." 

If it hadn't been for the tragic years of her own youth, 
Martha probably wouldn't be so determined to continue 
in radio. Paradoxical as that may sound, there is good 
reason for her choice. 

Martha's parents both died before she was three, leav- 
ing her to be farmed out for a few months at a time with 
various relatives.. It was not until she was ten that she 
had a permanent home with an uncle and aunt, in Colum- 
bus, Ohio. By that time Martha was a shy, silent girl who 

26 



By JANE COOPER 



REMEMBERING THE TRAGIC YEARS 



OF HER YOUTH SHE HAS TAKEN 



A STEP FEW WOMEN DARE TAKE! 



was nearly incapable of any emotion or affection at all. 

"It took my aunt a long, long time to erase the memory 
of those forlorn years when I was continually being moved 
from one town to another, from one family to another. I 
still remember how I felt the first time she brought home 
a big talking-and-walking doll and a bicycle for me." 

There was born in Martha as a result of this unnatural 
bringing up a burning determination to have three things: 
a home, a family, and a career. With Martha the career 
always came above everything else. ((Continued on page 67) 




Write or paste caption hare: 




Writs or paste caption hare: 




NOW FINISH THIS DIALOGUE 




Bert: You know when a columnist is sure 
he's a success? 
Snoop: No, when? 

Bert: 

(Write your original line here) 



$50000 



IN CASH PRIZES 



HERE ARE THE LAST THREE SCENES 
IN THE "BROADWAY MELODY OF 
1936" — RADIO MIRROR CONTEST 

FIRST PRIZE $200.00 

SECOND PRIZE 100.00 

FIVE PRIZES. Each $10.00 50.00 

TEN PRIZES. Each $5.00 50.00 

FIFTY PRIZES. Each $2.00 100.00 

I" AST month you selected sentences from among the 
seven given you with which to caption the first five 
scenes of this series. Here are two more scenes to fit with 
captions from the official list, and the final scene for which 
you are to supply a line of your own. If the space under 
the bottom picture is not large enough for your line you 
can use the margin below. Do not try to reproduce a line 
from the show in this last scene. Write something original 
with you. Keep your entry simple, avoid elaboration. Re- 
member the closing date, December 10th. 1935. 

THE CAPTION SENTENCES 

1. Keeler, I want a retraction of that cheap attack you 
made against a friend of mine. 

2. I came out to stick him for dinner — but I got stuck with 
sinkers. 

3. What are you doing back in New York, and in such 
bad company? 

4. Say, why doesn't he get that French dame? 

5. Good evening, you little scandal lovers. 

6. Snoop — remind me to ask for a raise tomorrow. 

7. You go back to your hotel, don't see or talk to anyone. 

THE RULES 

<j In November and December, RADIO MIRROR will publish a 
total of eight scenes from M-G-M's new Jack Benny picture, 
"Broadway Melody of 1936." 

O To compete, clip or trace each of the first seven scenes and 
caption each with one of the seven sentences supplied from the 
dialogue of the show. 

O Clip or trace the eighth scene and finish the caption, which 
will be a question from the show's dialogue, with a reply of 
your own composition. 

A For the set of seven scenes most appropriately captioned from 
among the supplied sentences accompanied by the best original 
reply to the question under the eighth scene a First Prize of $200.00 
will be awarded. For the next best entry $100.00 will be paid. Five 
$10.00 Prizes, Ten $5.00 Prizes, and Fifty Prizes of $2.00 each will 
also be paid. In case of ties, duplicate awards will be paid. 

C Wait until your set of eight scenes is complete before sending 
an entry. All entries must be received on or before Tuesday, 
December 10, 1935, the closing date of this contest. 

6 Submit all entries to Broadway Melody of 1936 Contest, 
RADIO MIRROR, P. O. Box 556, Grand Central Station, New 
York. N. Y. 

7 Anyone may compete except employees of Macfadden Publi- 
cations, Inc.. and M-G-M, and members of their families. 

27 






FACING 



THE 

Ml S I C 



THISA AND DATA AND GRAND 

INTIMATE NEWS AND GOSSIP 

ABOUT YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC- 
I MAKERS ON THE AIRWAVES 



W'J 



WITH JOHN SKINNER 



RADIO insiders present two rea- 
sons for Paul Whiteman's quit- 
ting his present sponsor, with 
the November 25th broadcast, after two 
and one half years on the air for him. 
First, it costs Paul the bulky sum of 
$7,000 a week to maintain such indi- 
vidual stars as Ramona and Helen Jep- 
N(>n, and there isn't enough money left 
to cover other expenses properly. Sec- 
ond, Whiteman wants to resume the mu- 
sical activities for which he first became famous, the design 
and advancement of modern music. As long as he must 
present a variety show, that is a practical impossibility. 

It is said, however, that if he does continue his present 
program policy on a new series, Whiteman is expecting 
the sponsor to meet his terms. 



MBING CROSBY, supported by Jimmy Dorsey's Orches- 
^^ tra, will pick up where Whiteman leaves off. In the 
Thursday night hour shows which start on December 5th, 
Ring will present many of his famous Hollywood friends. 
I he broadcasts, originating on the Pacific Coast, will have 

no outside visitors. 

* * * 

INSTRUMENTALISTS of another program which has 
moved to Hollywood are being paid top prices. Lennie 
Hayton has established new salary highs for four of his 
ace musicians. Charles Margulis, trumpet, receives |550 
weekly; Frank Signarelli, piano, Jack Jenny, trombone, 
and Flar/y Bluestone, violin, are receiving upwards of $250 
weekly each. Transportation for themselves and their wives 
was paid from New York to Hollywood, and will be paid 
on the trip back in December. 

It is reported, by the way, that Fred Astaire has been re- 
ceiving 88,000 a week on the Hayton show, which is just 
about the peak for any individual performer on a series. 

* * * 

% S long as we're going to start day-dreaming about the 
^* money the other fellow's making, we might as well 
look further into the matter. 

Ray Noble's salary on the program which he starts for 
a new sponsor on November 6th, is said to be $3,750 a 
broadcast. 

Every year for nine years, the Lombardo orchestra has 
played an engagement in Carrolton, Pa. The first year, they 
received $300. This fall, it was $3,000. But just the same 
ihe return engagements there are really more a matter of 
eritiment with them. 
23 



Grade's new maestro, left, Ferde 
Grofe; below, left, Allen Leafer, heard 
with his dance band over the Colum- 
bia Broadcasting System; below, right, 
Glen Gray is again conducting the 
Camel Caravan Tuesday nights with 
his popular Casa Loma orchestra. 




RED Nichols would like to point out to you, however, 
that a conductor's income isn't always what it seems. 

An orchestra leader in good standing is usually glad to 
make a contract for $2,500 a broadcast. But, of that price, 
some $1,500 goes for musician and manager salaries. Per- 
haps ten per cent of the rest is paid in commissions. Of 
the residue, much is needed for arrangements and orchestra- 
tions. The conductor's office; the cost of answering fan 
mail; photograph and publicity services; entertaining; 
union dues and fees; program recordings, and income taxes 
snap another chunk out of the $2,500. 

"If the average radio orchestra leader can keep twenty 
to twenty-five per cent of his salary," Red asserts, "he is 

doing quite well." 

* * * 

■^VER hear of the Kated Corporation? Four years old, 
•^ it has paid quarterly dividends regularly. It's head 
is Kate Smith and.it was formed to handle the business of 
Kate and her manager, Ted Collins. There are over fifty 
employees, every one a stockholder. 

Another intelligent financial move is that made by the 
Mills Brothers. They've been putting their money away in 

trust, and permit themselves only nominal salaries. 

* * * 

WNCOME prospects for Don Bestor look rather dark for 
* the time being. A local branch of the Musicians Union 
has expelled him. which means that he can't have a radio 



orchestra for you this season. It is charged that Don 
didn't pay the proper scale to his men while on the air 
with Benny from the Pacific Coast. An appeal is being 
made to the national headquarters of the musicians' or- 
ganization 

* * * 

SHORT SHORT SHORT STORIES 

If you happen to see that talkie short in which Ted Hu-.- 
ing introduces show world celebrities in such a friendly 
manner, you might recall, when Lennie Hayton appears on 
the screen, that the orchestra leader married the girl who 
was once Mrs. Husing . . . We did say that we were going 
to stop trying to keep pace with the Dorsey Brothers, who 
are all the time making up and breaking up, but since we 
told you earlier in this issue that Jimmy Dorsey's Orches- 
tra had been planned for the new Crosby broadcasts, we 
might let you know now that it looks as though the musical 
brothers have really split with finality. Tommy Dorsey is 
planning a band of his own . . . And though there are five 
Messner Brothers in Dick Messner's Orchestra, there is no 
Dick. Oh, no, there isn't. Dick is only a pseudonym, used 
by each of the brothers as he steps out to conduct. 

Grace Moore rather likes her few puffs from a long- 
stemmed clay pipe after dinner . . . Paul Sabin has been 
in California visiting Virginia Paxton. former New York 
show girl who is now in pictures . . . Hal Kemp is busy 
brushing up on tennis now. He just took a home in Forest 




Hills, L. I., a short distance from the 
famous tennis stadium . . . Sylvia Clark of 
NBCs Nickelodian program is looking for 
tear-jerker songs like "Only a Bird In a 
Gilded Cage" . . . Says she can't find 
enough of them ... If you know where to 
find any, send the information to us and 
we will forward it. 

Irma Glen, NBC organist, has moved to 
a new seven room home in Lake Bluff, Illi- 
nois, and has installed an electric organ for 
practicing . . . But look at Sigmund Rom- 
berg. He now has two studios in his home, 
what with all the programs and operettas 
he's working on . . . And in them he has 
three grand pianos as well as an electric 

organ. 

* * * 

ORCHESTRAL ANATOMY 

]%flOST fascinating among all radio or- 
* chestras, is the instrumental and vo- 
cal makeup of Andre Kostelanetz' great 
musical organization which you hear Wed- 
nesday and Saturday nights on the Colum- 
bia network. Whether you listen to popular 
music or symphonic music, or to both, you 
cannot help but be interested, for Kostel- 



anet/. ingeniously welds these two lorms most gratifying!) 
Thirteen of the sixteen violinists in the forty-five pieci 
orchestra have been concertmasters in world famous or- 
chestras. Besides these- sixteen violins, there are three 
violas, three celli, two bassev three trumpets, three trom- 
bones, three flutes, four saxophones, three oboes, harp, two 
pianos, percussion and guitar. Much of the orchestra- 
versatility is obtained through doubling in brass and wood- 
wind. Mutes and saxophones, for instance, can be changed 
into five flutes or six saxophones as needed 

As further background for Lily Pons and Nino Martini 
is a remarkable choral group of eighteen voices. It con- 
tains ten men and eight women. The voices are high and 
low. There are no contraltos. Sopranos are as high as pos- 
sible, basses as low. 

* * * 

THEME SONG SECTION 
r W^O save you trouble in writing us as so many have had 
to write Sigmund Romberg concerning the theme son^ 
he uses on his Tuesday night programs, we'll tell you about 
it now. It has no title. It has no words. It is written in 
three rhythms — waltz, foxtrot and one-step. This arrange- 
ment of rhythms may be what makes so many people wan; 
copies of it. But it has not been published. It all doc- 
seem a bit mysterious, but that's the way Mr. Romberg 
wants it to be. Someday, he says, when he's writing one 
of his operettas and the tune happens to fit some particular 
situation, then the words will be written and the music 
will be published. 

The theme song used by Charley Boulanger and his or- 
chestra is "Meet Me Tonight In My Dreams," an original 
composition by the conductor himself. (For Thomas Han- 
sen. St. Louis, Mo.) 

* *• * 

COMPOSE YOURSELF 

^■^O all you who have written concerning the best way 
* to tackle songwriting, we must repeat that we cannot 
be too encouraging about the (Continued on pane 70) 



Extreme left, Joe Venuti conducts 
some late dance music via the 
NBC airwaves; next comes Mark 
Warnow, whose music you often 
hear on the Columbia air; left, 
Dick Messner, also on CBS; and 
below, ork pilot Frank Dailey. 




WHAT THIS GRAND NEW 
DEPARTMENT GIVES YOU 

All the latest news and go: 
about popular music and musicians 




2. The exact size and 
famous orchestras. 



personnel of 



3. Inside facts about signature songs 
and theme songs. 

Where your favorite radio orches- 
tras are playing each month. 

A chance to get your own ques- 
tions about popular songs and 
bands answered. 




INIO MORE 



// 




CORPORATIONS 



WHEN A RADIO STAR TAKES TIME OFF TO WIN YOUR 
APPROVAL IN MOVIES HE MUST GUARD AGAINST 



THAT "BAY WINDOW/' HERE'S HOW JIMMY DID IT ! 



By ETHEL 
CAREY 



for Palmolive Beauty Box 
with James Melton, see 
page 56 — 9 o'clock column. 



SO you wish that husband of yours would lose his 
corpo — his triple-padded chin. And you, Mr. 
Much-Too-Fat, sigh at the remembrance of the 
good old days of your youth, when you had a figure 
worth looking at, not a jellied promontory. Maybe the 
girls would like you again, if you got into trim. And 
maybe Friend Wife wouldn't pant in admiration and 
moon over Clark Gable and Gary Cooper, if your out- 
line looked a little more like theirs. 

You don't know how it can be done? You always 
thought that keeping slim was only a problem for the 
ladies? Well, then, get wise to yourself, Brother. Take 
a tip from someone who's bounced off thirty-three 
pounds of superfluous fat in six months. A real he-man, 
too. None other than handsome, romantic Jimmy Mel- 
lon, whom you hear every week on the air, and whom 
you'll be seeing soon in the motion picture "Thin Air." 

In fact, that picture is the main reason Jimmy reduced. 
That and the fact that he believes body and voice are so 
closely knit, that the voice can't be at its best unless the 
body is in shipshape condition. 

"Ever since I was a child," Jimmy told me. "I've been 
bothered by the tendency to get stout. I was always the 
tat one in the family. The kids on the block always called 
me 'Chubby.' When I grew older, it didn't bother me so 
much. Between playing football and working in bands 
while going to college, and picking up all sorts of odd jobs 
lo make both ends meet, the fat didn't stand a chance. I 
didn't rest long enough. 

Somebody's said that you can always tell prosperity by 
the amount of padding. I found that just as soon as I was 
ill set on the air and things were going smoothly. 01' Deb- 
bil Fat began creeping up on me again. Last spring, I 
weighed 217 pounds, or thirty-three more than I do today." 
|immv is six feet two inches tall and IK4 pounds is just 




right for his height and he's going to stay that way. 

Now, it happens that Jimmy has a wife. The cutest, 
prettiest little girl. And tiny, Dresden-doll-like Marjofie 
Melton is a perfect size fourteen. So goodness knows there's 
no call for her to reduce. But thereon hangs the story be- 
hind the story of how Jimmy lost weight. 

Little Marjorie Melton didn't like her handsome, jolly, 
strapping Jimmy's excess avoirdupois. She first tried to 
remedy matters herself. Jimmy, you know, was raised 
down South, and just loves fried chicken, hot breads, rice. 
sweet potatoes and gravy, and of course Marjorie had 
learned to cook them, all with plenty of fresh butter. 

Discreetly and gradually, she began to cut these from 
the Melton menu, substituting lean meats, chops and green 
vegetables. Stewed fruits for dessert. Citrus drinks to 
quench thirst and cut down appetite. But while Jimmy 



didn't gain any more weight he lost but very little. 

[hen it was that Warner Brothers proved to be her best, 
though quite unconscious allies. They offered Jimmy a 
picture contract, provided his motion picture test proved 
satisfactory. That was in l°34, not l°3S, mind you. 

Well, the camera is a pretty stern taskmaster. In fact, 
when it comes to weight, it's a downright liar. It adds fit- 
teen pounds to weight. Don't ask me why, but it's so. 
Figure it out for yourself. With Jimmy weighing 217 
pounds, plus an extra fifteen given by the camera for good 
measure, what kind of figure do you think he'd have cut? 

Then it was that Jimmy began to diet in earnest. "You 
know how it is when you're on the air," he told me. "You 
haven't time for much exercise. Each day you rehearse; 
then you chase around trying to pick out songs, and make 
arrangements; then you've got to take pictures, answer 
correspondence, buy new clothes, receive the press and do 
a million and one other things. 

"All of them tire you out, just as typing eight hours a 
day does a stenographer, or (C.ontmued <m page "0) 




James Melton's Reducing Diet 

MONDAy— TOTAL CALORIES— 1530 
Breakfast Calories 

Orange juice 100 

2 Boiled eggs 1 50 

1 Slice toast (very little 

butter) 1 00 

Coffee (tsp. sugar and 

skimmed milk) 50 



400 



Lunch Calories 

Salad mixed greens (let- 
tuce, cucumber, grated 
raw carrots, celery — 
with mineral oil 
dressing) 75 

3 Soda crackers 75 

Apple sauce 1 50 

Tea (1 tsp. sugar, lemon) 50 

350 



Dinner 


Calories 


Tomato soup (1 cup) 


100 


Broiled chicken 


250 


String beans (no butter) 


50 


Corn (no butter) 


100 


Sliced tomatoes 


30 


Stewed peaches (2) 


100 


■ 1 Glass milk (regular) 


150 




780 



TUESDAY— TOTAL CALORIES— 1550 



Breakfast Calories 

Stewed prunes (4) 200 

Dry cereal with skimmed 

milk 100 

Coffee 50 



Lunch Calories 

Kraut juice cocktail 50 

Crab flake salad (min- 
eral oil dressing) 250 
Slice wheat toast (little 
butter) 1 00 
50 



450 



350 


Iced tea 




Dinner 




Calories 


Half grapefruit 




100 


Medium portion steak 




400 


Carrots and peas 




' 50 


Asparagus 




50 


1 Glass milk 




150 



750 
For the rest of the diet turn to page 60 



Another of James 
Melton's tips to 
you who have 
avoirdupois 
trouble, is rope- 
jumping. Below, as 
the handsome 
singer appears in 
Warner's "Stars 
Over Broadway." 



All his life, the Irish 
tenor has been trying 
to live down his weight. 
With the advice of 
Marjorie, his wife, 
Jimmy has reduced 
some thirty-odd 
pounds. Upper left 
corner, getting in trim 
with the punching bag. 
Above, the Palmolive 
Beauty Box star is en- 
joying a game of deck 
tennis with Manorie. 





wards. 



FTER clue consideration, this court has decided to 
grant the petition of Penelope Trumble Edwards 
which sues for divorce from the person of John Ed- 



Penelope turned her back to the one daring shaft of 
mellow September sun that slid under the shade of the high 
west window and penetrated the gloom of the courtroom. 

While Judge Van Brunt's voice droned on, two tears 
gathered at the corners of her eyes and hung glistening on 
the lower fringes of her lashes. She felt the reassuring 
pressure of Steve's hand on her elbow. Nothing had changed 
— outside the calm surface of the river still flowed majesti- 
cally downstream, the tall elms that lined Riverdale's dusty 
main street still whispered mysteriously to themselves — yet 
everything was different. 

With each word that the judge spoke she was losing John, 
losing her husband. After nine years they had come to the 
end of the road together. 

The judge's voice broke off, went on more hurriedly. 
"This decree of divorce to be considered final in three 
months from this day and date." 

Penelope stood up, her tiny figure erect and dignified in 
its blue linen suit. "Is — is that all?" 

"Yes, Penelope." The judge hesitated. "I don't know 
what to say, except I'm sorry." 

If it had been sympathy Penelope wanted, everything 
would have been easy. But it was John she wanted, John 
admitting that his infatuation over this girl, Sonia, was 
something finished. Yet it was the very hopelessness of her 
wanting that had driven her to divorce. In two weeks John 
was leaving, sailing for Paris. Two more weeks, then 
dragging months of listlessness until her damaged pride was 
restored a little. 

Steve put his arm around her shoulder. 

"Let's get going," he said. "I'll drive you home." 

Dear Steve. He was always like this, standing by, wait- 
ing until she needed him, never speaking of his love unless 
she wanted to hear it. Steve, the storybook hero who asked 
nothing more than understanding, a chance to help and 
comfort. 

He didn't speak again until they were seated in his car. 
As he turned the ignition key and shifted the car to low 
gear, he said : 

"Penelope, are you still in love with John, after this 
Sonia business and everything?" 

"You know," she replied, "I fell in love with him when 
I was in grade school. I still like chocolate ice cream, I 
still wish on the new moon, and I'm still fond of John 
Edwards." 

Steve sighed and started the car up the street towards 
the Trumble house at the top of the hill, Riverdale's most 
imposing memento of its thriving days at the turn of the 
century when Penelope's father had been practically the 
whole town. It still looked imposing even today. 

As they passed through the 
wrought iron gateway and up 
the gravel road to the white pil- 
lared porch. Steve spoke de- 
cisively 

"Penelope, what you need is 
work, good hard honest work. 
Why don't you go to New York 
or some place — change your 
personality, take up singing or 

32 



FICTIONIZED BY 
NORTON RUSSELL 

from Helen Hayes' radio program 
"The New Penny" by Edith Meiser 



tap dancing, use more make-up, do your hair up different?" 

Penelope laughed, fresh color rushing back into her face. 
"Steve, you know I can't smoke without coughing, I don't 
enjoy flirting, and I still look silly in make-up. It's no use. 
I just have to be myself. I'm going to settle right down 
here in Riverdale, in the old house I was born in." 

"Listen," Steve growled, "if you imagine I'm going to 
let you think yourself into a state of dry rot, you're mis- 
taken. You can't just let yourself go to waste, not with all 
your understanding of people. You know how to handle 
them. You've got common sense and plenty of tact. In 
fact, you're just about the most fundamentally capable 
person I know." 

"Steve, that's the nicest thing anyone's said to me for a 
dog's age." 

"Then I'm going to see that you get started in something. 
Got any particular burning interest at the moment?" 

"Same as I always had — babies. I've always wanted 
them, but you can't raise a family on the wing and we've 
never stayed more than a month in one place since we 
were married. Then, too, John never wanted any." 

fiTEVE snapped his fingers. "I've got it — got the answer. 
^ Penelope, you're going to be the new matron of .the 
St. Vincent's Foundling Home. Miss Hurley is resigning 
this week to get married and you're taking her place!" 
"But Steve— I— I—" 

"No arguments," Steve said hurriedly. "You'll have three 
trained nurses to do all the practical work. Your main 
job'll be matching up the babies to the most congenial 
parents." 

"Sounds like full time work," Penelope smiled, too 
stunned to protest further. 

"It is, but that's just what you want. I know you can 
manage it." 

Suddenly Penelope made up her mind. She'd accept 
Steve's offer as matron and executive head. If he could 
get her the job, she'd take it! 

"All right, I'll do my darndest on one condition: We 
move the whole, business out of that awful dilapidated old 
building it's in now." 

"Sure, but where to? We haven't the money for a new 
place." 

"That's where 1 come in," Penelope said eagerly. "We 
move into my house. It's big enough and it's cheerful. And 
— oh, Steve, let's do that. It's just what I need." 

Steve had to consent. When Penelope slipped out of the 
front seat of the car, he said, "I'll get you in the morning 
and drive you over to meet the head nurse. If she says so 
we'll move this week." 

Then he was gone, his powerful roadster swirling back 
down around the driveway. Penelope walked across the 
porch into the wide hallway of the big house, alone with 
her one faithful servant, Millie. She paused a moment. 

then went on to the library 
lined on four sides with well 
worn books. 

With a sigh she sat down in 
the creaky leather chair that 
had been John's favorite, her 
eyes closed, and dreamed back 
over the years. Their first 
Christmas after they were mar- 
ried. John's old slippers and 




For Helen Hayes' 
program, spon- 
sored by Sanka 
Coffee, see page 
56 — 9 o'clock col. 






i 



WHETHER OR NOT YOU'VE BEEN LIS- 
TENING TO HELEN HAYES' GRAND 
PORTRAYAL OF PENELOPE ON THE 
AIR, READ THE HEART- WARMING 
SERIAL DRAMA IN STORY FORM! 

I LLUSTR ATED BY J AMES 
MONTGOMERY FLAGG 



smoking jacket. Their new year's resolutions. And 
she knew that she had always loved him. But to- 
night these memories were not so bittersweet. To- 
night she was beginning something new, some- 
thing, perhaps, that would save her from herself. 
She ate a lonely dinner and then went to bed with 
a half finished novel. 

Everything was more cheerful when she woke 
in the morning. During the night a storm had 
blown up, sweeping the atmosphere clean of its 
heavy mugginess and with it had gone her pre- 
monitions and doubts about the job she was un- 
dertaking. The white bedroom was flooded 
with warm morning sunshine. Penelope 
jumped out and dressed with a song in her 
heart. 

Steve came on the stroke of nine as she 
stood in front of the hall mirror daubing a 
last bit of powder on a ridiculously imper- 
tinent nose. 

"Hi, Steven!" she greeted, waving the puff 
at him. "Hope you aren't as nervous as I 
am about this foundling business." 

He saw the sparkle in her deep blue eyes 
and grinned. It had been so long since Pene- 
lope had really smiled, had shown any real 
interest in anything. They ran out the door 
and down the steps to his car. On the way 
across town to the Home, he told her that 
everything had been arranged for her to 
take the vacancy. "All the trustees but one 
were unanimous in electing you." 

"And the one?" 

"Mrs. Crowder. Mrs. Van Alastair Mac- 



It had been so long since Penelope had 
really smiled, had shown any real interest in 
anything. There was a sparkle in her eyes. 




Donald Crowder. Penny, you're going u> have a battle on 
your hands with her. She's important because old man 
Crowder once gave ten thousand bucks to the St. Vincent's 
sinking fund." 

"We'll see about Mrs. Van Crowder," Penelope prom- 
ised "What are some more problems?" 

"Well, there's Miss MacDumfrey, the head nurse. A lady 
tiger isn't halt as fierce about her cubs as she is about her 
babies. You won't have to wait long to tell whether she 
likes you." 

"Oh gosh, Steve, I hope I can pass muster," Penelope 
said. 

Steve leaned over and patted her gloved hand. "Sure 
you will." • 

The foundling's Home looked even gloomier than Pene- 
lope had remembered it, an old warehouse remodeled years 
ago. in sad need of several new coats of paint, a battered 
fence around it that swayed with every passing breeze, 
shutters on its windows that banged and rattled. 

"Steve, this is awful," she said, follow- 
ing him up the rough walk to the wait 
ing room. "And the disinfect 
smell, even out here!" 

They encountered Miss Mac- 
Dumfrey just inside the door. 
Steve introduced them. For a 
moment Penelope thought 
that the nurse was going to 
throw them both out bodily, 
but as they began to talk, 
the tension lessened. Soon 
they were finding things on 
which to agree. 

"But this is a terrible 
place in which to bring up 
babies," Penelope said, look- 
ing at the battered furniture, 
the torn wall paper. 

"Better than nothing." 

"Of course, but suppose I sug- 
gested that you move this whole out 
fit up to my house — babies, nui 
equipment and everything else?" 

"You mean move into the Trumble house?" 

Penelope nodded. "You see, we could turn 
the ballroom into a nursery, it's nice and big 
and sunny and faces south." 

"How about the kitchen facilities?" Miss 
MacDumfrey interrupted. 




"OENELOPE knew then that the nurse 
was weakening. She followed up her ad- 
vantage. "There's a serving pantry right off 
the ballroom and the kitchen isn't more than 
twenty feet down the side hall. We have a 
big laundry with three tubs, washer, ironer, and laundress." 

"Hot water?" 

"Enough for a hotel." 

"Hmmmm. It sounds too good to be true." 

An assistant nurse came into the room, a sour smile warp- 
ing her turned down mouth. 

"Mrs. Crowder is waiting in the front hall with a pho- 
tographer. Want's a baby girl to hold for a picture for 
some magazine. And her with such a cold, too!" 

"She has a cold and she wants to hold one of my babies? 
Over my dead body! Where is she?" the head nurse 
snapped. 

It was a militant Miss MacDumfrey who marched out 
to face Mrs. Crowder, Penelope discreetly following a few 
paces behind. 

"Sorry," the nurse opened a frontal attack, "I haven't 
any babies available at the moment for picture taking." 
"What--" Mrs. Crowder fretted. "That's ridiculous." 

34 



Helen Hayes has 
put aside her movie 
work to devote her- 
self to "The New 
Penny," the radio 
story so engross- 
ingly Actionized on 
these pages. 



Taking the bit between her teeth, Penelope interrupted, 
"Yes, you see they're all taking naps. Being a model 
mother yourself, you realize how important it is not to 
wake them. If you won't think it impertinent, I've a better 
idea." 

"Oh?" Mrs. Crowder said suspiciously. 

"^7 ES, I want you to be the very first to know we're 
moving the Foundling's Home to my house and 
wouldn't it be splendid publicity if you had your picture 
taken on the front porch?" 

"We-e-11, there's something in that. Of course I'm not 
sure I entirely approve of your moving. This Home has 
been here for thirty years." 

"That's ' true," Penelope admitted, "but sometimes a 
change is for the best." She smiled and paused a moment. 
"And Mrs. Crowder, if you're going to have that picture 
taken, you'd better hurry before the sun gets any higher, 
an everhead light is never as flattering." 
"In that case. I guess I'd better run along. 
Don't forget, Penelope, just call on me 
there's anything you want to know." 
he door closed with a bang. Steve 
moved out from a side room 
where he'd been standing. 
"Still here?" Penelope asked. 
"I thought you'd gone." 
"Don't be so optimistic," 
Steve laughed. "But we can 
go now, can't we?" 
As Penelope turned to say- 
goodbye, a freckle-faced boy 
came to the screen door, 
balancing himself on a 
crutch. Miss MacDumfrey 
caught sight of him first. 
"And who are you?" she 
called. 
"I'm Mickey," the boy replied. 
'I've run away from the city or- 
anage. I — I thought maybe you 
could — could take me in." 
"Why'd you run away?" 
"Because everyone made fun of — of my 
leg. They call me Limpy. Can't I stay, 
please?" 

Penelope felt her heart going out to the 
waif. Before the nurse could speak, she ran 
to the door. "Of course you can stay. You 
can be my assistant." And although Miss 
MacDumfrey and Steve objected, Penelope 
had her way. When she and Steve left, 
Mickey went with them. 

On the way back to her house, Steve 
warned, "You can't always get around Mrs. 
Crowder as easily as you did this morning." 

"Mrs. Crowder be hanged!" Penelope snorted. "When I 
saw that woman today, I knew we'd come to blows sooner 
or later and I always say if there's got to be a fight, hit 
first and hit hard!" 

Penelope began her new labors that same day. With the 
help of the maid, Steve, and Mickey, she moved most of 
the furniture out of the ballroom. It was hard work, but 
it was fun, and she was glad she'd started. Before the or- 
phans could be moved, a whole week of just as hard labor 
was needed. 

And even with the moving task finished, problems were 
just beginning. First there was Mrs. Crowder. Penelope 
realized that at every turn she would be confronted with 
objections from this trustee. Then there was Steve, Steve 
who loved her, whom she wanted at her side, but without 
the ties that inevitably he would one day demand. 
There was only one way to (Continued on page 62) 






ALL YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT 




,. 



THIS IS THE PROGRAM THAT HAS 
BEEN AND STILL IS RADIO'S BIGGEST 
WORRY, PROUDEST ACHIEVEMENT 



RADIO'S biggest worry . . . radio's proudest achieve- 
ment . . . radio's most useful, most patriotic pro- 
gram! Ladies, gentlemen and little children, we're 
talking of your favorite Sunday afternoon half-hour, 
Roses and Drums. 

It's this program that spoils the smooth sleep of the 
rajahs of radio because it deals principally with the Civil 
War. And although the Civil War ended seventy years 
ago, its battlefields are still smouldering. It is a subject 
still packed with dynamite. 

Tell any resident of Georgia that Sherman was a nice 
guy and no buts, and he'll hit you with your glasses on — 
even though this be the year of our love 193 5. Be too 
nice to Lincoln, and fifty thousand Southerners will sit 

down to their writing 
Above, from left to right, in 
costume, are Reed Brown, Jr., 
the Yankee captain; Helen 
Claire, Florence Williams, and 
John Griggs, the Rebel cap- 
tain. In circle, a lovely por- 
trait of Helen Claire as Betty. 
Graham. For Roses and Drums, 
sponsored by the Union Cen- 
tral Life Insurance Co., see 
page 54 — 5 o'clock column. 



desks and boil the 
broadcasters in ink. 
Attack him, and every 
Yankee from Bridge- 
port to Bangor will 
pitch his set into the 
pig-pen. 

Roses and Drums 
has been and is one 
of radio's most diffi- 
cult problems. It has 



done more to heal old sores, more to rub out the Mason- 
Dixon Line than any other single factor in recent history. 
By glorifying the heroes of the blue and gray armies, it has 
sent a surge of patriotic feeling through the veins of all 
listeners, a feeling of pride for the stuff Americans are 
made of. 

Evidence that this popularity of the Civil War as a 
dramatic subject and of Roses and Drums as a radio fea- 
ture is still growing, can be seen in the decision to con- 
tinue the program through the summer of 1935. In the 

35 



two previous years it has taken a thirteen-weeks' vacation 
during the warm spell, to the accompaniment of angry let- 
ters from its devoted followers. 

The problem of presenting the war in a form that would 
give no offense was solved by a few tricks and a lot of 
common sense. In the first place, the program makers 
avoided all red flag phrases. They knew the South did not 
like to hear it described as the Civil War or the War of 
the Rebellion. You will always find it referred to as the 
War Between the States. 

When characters whose names aroused antagonism were 
brought on the stage, the writers simply painted them as 
ordinary human beings, with all their faults and virtues. 
Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Grant and Lee were made just 
folks, and no one could get really mad at them for that. 

They went further. When Lincoln is introduced, he is 
not put forward as the perfect individual, the way he is 
served up in New England school readers. We hear Stan- 
ton crying out that Lincoln is a hypocrite. We hear some- 
one else telling Stanton to shut up. 

When Grant is ac- 
cused of being heart- ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
less, someone pipes up 
and tells the story of 
how Grant worked all 
night to save a few 
horses who had fallen 
into a ditch. In the case 
of Sherman, we have 1 
Southerners attacking 
him bitterly and, in the 
General's defense, we 
have him expressing re- 
gret that he is obliged 
to march through Geor- 
gia while condoning it 
as a necessity of war. 

In this way, the au- 
thors have struck a 
balance. No one is of- 
fended. 

ft O S E S AND 
M * DRUMS was born 
in a room full of cigar 
smoke. Six men, look- 
ing for a program idea 
that would combine 
education with ro- 
mance, worked it out 
after an eight-hour ses- 
sion in a New York 
office early in 1932. It 
went on the air for the 
first time in April of 
that year. The idea was 
to present a pageant of 
American history from 
the earliest times until 
the present, history in- 
terwoven with the. life 
of a typically American 
family. The name of 
the family was Wright. 
After three months, 
the program was moved 
to Chicago. It came 
back to New York in 
December, 1932.- At the 
beginning, Roses and 
Drums was simply' a 
series of stories from 
American history. The 
only unifying thread 
36 




was the presence in each story of some member of the 
Wright family. 

Leading actors then as now were invited to play the 
parts of the historical characters. The problem of research 
loomed large. Professor M. W. Jernegan, of the University 
of Chicago, was given the job of editing and checking the 
scripts — and he is still doing it, although the job grows in- 
creasingly difficult. 

The title, with its well known martial signature, this pro- 
gram had from the start. Roses appeared in the title as 
symbols of love and romance; drums for progress, for 
war, for adventure. It was successful almost at once, 
although its present popularity has been a slow, steady 
growth. Its sponsor is the Union Central Life Insurance 
Company. 

The Roses and Drums which came back to New York 
in December of 1932 was the program you know today. 
Betty Graham, Captain Randy Claymore of the Southern 
army and Captain Gordon Wright of the Union forces, all 
familiar characters to us now, made their bow in that 

home-coming broad- 
cast in New York. 

Reed Brown, Jr., 
created the role of Gor- 
don Wright, and he 
still plays it today. He 
is so accustomed to the 
role that he turns when 
someone says Gordon. 
John Griggs, who is 
Randy today, was 
Randy then. The only 
change in principals 
occurred a year ago 
when Betty Love, who 
was Betty Graham, an- 
nounced her intention 
of leaving. 

Which, citizens of 
the radio world, was 
quite a blow to the pro- 
ducers. People were 
gaga about her voice. 
It was a caressing 
voice, a voice as South- 
ern as peach-bloom. 
She could not be dis- 
suaded. The producers 
looked everywhere for 
another just like it. 
They listened to hun- 
dreds of voices, and 
just at the point where 
they were about to 
give up the search along 
came Helen Claire, ap- 
pearing in "Jezebel," a 
Broadway play, a girl 
from Union Springs, 
Alabama. 

Her voice was natur- 
ally a great deal like 
the voice of Betty 
Love. The (Con- 
tinued on page 76) 



Young Eddie Wragge, 
Mrs. Richard Mansfield 
and Charles Webster, 
played the parts of 
Tad Lincoln, Mary Todd 
and Abraham Lincoln. 







LAWRENCE TIBBETT 

The dramatic baritone has returned to the airwaves after 
completing the 20th Century-Fox picture, "Metropolitan," 
with the lovely blonde Virginia Bruce as his inspiration. 



Hurrell 



38 




40 




BY JOYCE ANDERSON 



PROBABLY no woman on the air — or elsewhere, for 
that matter — knows so much about natural, delicate 
feminine charm as does Jessica Dragonette. You have 
only to see her. as I saw her at the broadcast that night, 
in her very French evening gown of silver lame in tones of 
blue and mauve, to realize that. Later, in her black and 
silver dressing room at NBC. she explained her beauty 
theories to me. Daintiness. Individuality. Taste. < Imagi- 
nation 

"And most important of all, I think." she said earnestly, 
"is not to be thinking and talking of personal beauty all 
the time. Give yourself the very best grooming, the very 
best costuming, that you possibly can — and then keep 
your mind alert to other things. A woman who does this, 
who keeps her appearance attractive and her interest in 
things alive, can't help being a personality. 

"The best costuming means clothes that suit your type 
and that fit your mood. I'm naturally a great believer in 
mood. If I'm going to sing Liebestraum. I wear filmy 
tulle, a truly dream-like frock. For little Mexican songs, I 
wear Spanish-type hues. I'm particularly fond of those yel- 
low and red combinations, though my favorite colors are 
white, blue and green, which seem to be my special colors. 
"The best grooming, of course, starts with perfect clean- 
liness. I'm another of your firm believers in plenty of soap 
and water. I have to take very good care of both skin and 
hair because 1 love outdoor life and sunshine. I use a very 
special British cold cream soap which I couldn't do with- 
out, for my skin. For my hair's sake, I have frequent hot 
oil applications before the actual shampoo. And I brush my 
hair a great deal." Jessica's hair shows the results, too — a 
fine golden sheen and a soft texture like a baby's silky 
curlv 

She paused, then spoke quickly, "I almost forgot one of 
my real skin care secrets. I often cleanse my face with 
almond meal. You can get it delicately scented, you know, 
in charming packages I make a fine paste of it in the palm 



BEAUTY A LA 



JESSICA 
DRAGONETTE 



Would you like to have a complete list 
giving full names and prices of all the 
fascinating beauty preparations mentioned 
in this month's article? Do you have some 
personal beauty problem that is causing 
you trouble and annoyance? Or would you 
like a new way to use your cosmetics or 
coiffures to suit your face and your type? 
Send your query, with a stamped, self- 
addressed envelope, to Joyce Anderson, 
RADIO MIRROR, 1926 Broadway, N. Y. 



There's a reason for her charm and daintiness. 
The lovely singer tells you some of her beauty 
theories. Jessica Dragonette is heard on the 
Cities Service Hour — page 56—8 o'clock column. 



of one hand and apply it gently with the fingertips of the 
other. It cleanses the pores, so beautifully, and leaves the 
skin so petal-smooth. 

"As for general make-up," she added, "I think the wax 
we apply our face powder is all important. 1 use very 
little, for a very personal reason: because the tones of my 
skin and my hair are so close that I almost prefer having 
the same sheen to both of them! Since 1 am a singer, first 
and last, 1 can't take the chance of getting the slightest film 
of powder into my nostrils, so I pat it on gently and 
lightly." 

As a matter of fact, you can get adorable sets of blend- 
ing brushes, today, one for your powder and one for your 
rouge. Also, if you're looking for a new foundation, there's 
a splendid new protective cream whose formula contains 
skin ointment. It's applied with its companion skin tonic 
and gives a very filmy, natural complexion base. And 
there's a special cream put out by another reliable com- 
pany which is designed just to cover up that last-minute 
hicky which always pops up to spoil your complexion on 
the night of nights. 

I asked Jessica about her marvelously long eyelashes. "I 
use plain vaseline overnight." she answered, "to promote 
their growth and counteract the use of cosmetics. When I 
use mascara. I use one of the new tubes of paste which 
helps to curl the lashes and keeps them soft, even while 
darkening them." For those special occasions, there's a new- 
type iridescent eye-shadow sponsored by a famous cosmetic 
firm at a moderate price. 

"Nearly everyone uses two coats of nail polish." she con- 
tinued, "but I suppose I'm the only girl in America who 
uses two coats of lipstick! To keep my lips from chap- 
ping, 1 always wear one of the natural' lipsticks as a 
pomade for my lips. On top of that, I wear the brilliant 
or warm shade which harmonizes with my costume and 
the lights I'm about to face." 

Do you have trouble getting a firm outline to your lips? 
You'll welcome the indelible red make-up pencil with which 
ybu can draw the shape of mouth you want and then fill it 
in with your own favorite lip-rouge. If you have trouble 
with lipstick smearing on your (Continued on page 59) 

41 




WHEN Uncle Jim Riley wrote Mickey to come to 
New York and audition for his Amateur Hour 
she didn't want to go. But Tad changed her mind. 
"Sure we'll go," he told her and go they did. They audi- 
tioned their act — Mickey Crail played the piano and sang, 
while Tad Byron sang and imitated bird calls — and were' 
good enough to win a place on the next Sunday night broad- 
cast. •What did I tell you?" Tad gloated, but Mickey 
wasn't so sure it was a good thing. Of course she and Tad 
didn't love each other. They'd always been too busy having 
a good time for that, but suddenly she was afraid that in 
New York she might lose Tad. And she knew then that 
life wouldn't be any fun without him. Sunday night finally 
came and Mickey found herself sitting on the stage of 
Radio City's largest studio with seven other amateur acts. 
lad prodded her in the ribs: "Wake up, Sap," he growled. 

%M1CKEY foundherself walking towards the microphone 
* with Tad's arm firmly linked in hers. The whisper 
of the crowd and the first hesitant hand clapping came to 
42 



Hi!" she waved from the veranda. 

Don't tell me your names. I know — 

went to the broadcast Sunday." 



ILLUSTRATED BY FRANK GODWIN 



her from a remote distance, like the- harmless rumble of 
thunder on the horizon. All her senses were concentrated 
now on reaching Uncle Jim and answering his questions. 

Then she was there, and Uncle Jim was shaking her hand, 
and Tad was smiling the one smile in the world that auto- 
matically made her feel better. 

"These are two kids from Pougkeepsie, New York," 
Uncle Jim said into the mike. "Mickey Crail and Tad 
Byron. Mickey is the daughter of that famous old-time 
vaudeville star, Ade Crail, so I guess she really belongs 
here beside me. Tad, will you tell our listeners what you 
do when you aren't broadcasting on this Amateur Hour?" 

Tad said. "Sure. 1 graduated from engineering school 
this June. I've been waiting until fall when jobs open up." 

"Maybe you'll get one after tonight," Uncle Jim an- 
swered. 

The first numbness was wearing off. For the first time 
Mickey was able to look around and recognize the studio 
and the stage. She wondered what Uncle Jim would ask 
her. what her reply would be. But instead he went on: 



^-^7 / 
'1 







*A 



*A 



\* 



*^ 



^'<>' 







TOOW 



^ 



"Now if you two are ready. I'll sit back 
ind listen." 

Singing their song, Mickey knew they 
were good. Tad had never whistled better. 
She wished she could be sitting in the li- 
brary at home, near the radio. It would be 
fun to hear your own voice broadcasting. 
At the end of the song, she even let her fin- 
gers wander off into minor chords, some- 
thing she usually reserved for the privacy 
of her music room. 

Whether or not it was because their talent was so out- 
standing, Byron and Crail made a hit with the studio au- 
dience. If clapping alone had counted in awarding prizes, 
they would have walked off with first place hands down. 

Tad placed the back of his hand to his forehead in a 
salute to victory. 

"Kid, we wowed them. What did you do. hypnotize 
those keys?" 

Uncle Jim's frown quieted his exultation. Mickey thanked 
Tad for his compliment with a glance in which he could 
have read more than appreciation, had he been looking. 

Though for Mickey the broadcast was ended, another 
torty minutes had to go by before she could leave the 
Mudio. They must wait, too, until the phone calls had been 
tabulated and the winners announced. "" 

\t last it was all over. Watching in fascination. Mickey 
saw the minute hand of the electric clock creep to the hour 
of ten. The last announcement of the voting that Uncle 
Jim made, before the theme song ended another Hour, was: 
"Tannera, the gypsy, I4S6; Jeff Bowers, 1238; Byron and 
Crail, 1179." 

Tad said, in a voice that held puzzlement and disbelief. 
"Don't toss in the towel yet. Mickey, we still have a 
chance." 

Mickey turned to watch the audience file out. sheep 
fashion, in their hurry to be at something else, the eight 
amateur acts that had given them an hour's entertainment 
glowing embers in their memories, stories to be recalled 
months from now. 

Uncle |im sat down next to her. "The rest of the votes 



will be coming in any minute. Of course we won't have 
any mail for a day or two. but the letters almost always 
confirm the phone calls." He noticed Tad's expression of 
disappointment. 

Don't tell me you expected to win!" 

A Byron always expects to win," Tad replied, smiling. 

"I'm glad we didn't." Mickey said impulsively. 

"Why, Crail! Where's that true fighting spirit you once 
had?" Tad scolded. 

"Here — stop bickering," Uncle Jim interposed. "Even if 
you didn't get first prize, you made enough impression on 
the audience to be getting offers before long." 

"What kind of offers?" Tad asked. 

Mickey grew impatient. "Come on. Tad, let's go. I'm 
terribly tired," she pleaded. But Tad hung back. Not 
until the last vote came in. placing Tannera first, did he 
say. 

"Okay, little one. Let's be on our way." 

Going down in the elevator. Mickey remembered Tad's 
invitation. "I'll be a nice girl this time, even if it doesn't 
get you any place," she smiled. "I'm going to let you out 
of your date for the Rainbow Room." 

"Hear, hear," Tad mocked. "Isn't that sweet of you. 
And I'd been planning all along on a big evening. But 
of course, if you're set on getting home—" 

"Certainly not. If it means so much to you. we'll go." 

"Nope." Tad said. "Wouldn't think of it now. 

He did, however, as proof that he held no ill will, flag 
a cab that was prowling the streets and push Mickey in. 
It was a waste of money. Mickey supposed, but those few- 
short blocks home looked longer in her imagination than 
the circular staircase up the Statue of Libern . 

In the hall, outside her room, Mickey pulled Tad's head 
down near her own level, and kissed him goodnight. 

"Hey, cut it out!" Tad said. "Stage people aren't allowed 
to have emotions." 

"See you in the morning, Lothario. And it has been 
fun, hasn't it?" Five minutes later, without even a cold 
creaming, her face was buried in the pillow. She tried to 
think back over the day and was asleep before she got to 
church. 

\\ ithout much effort, she was up and dressed by eight- 
thirty. Her last curl had just fallen out of place again, 
when Tad rapped on the door and walked in. 

'Come in," she mocked and waved him to a chintz 
covered rocker. He slumped down, his half-closed eves 
blinking in an effort to stav open. 

4} 



"Well," Miekey asked, smoothing out the wrinkles in 
her dress, "now that it's all over, what train do we catch 
tor the teeming metropolis of Poughkeepsie? Remember, 
we promised our parents we'd be back today at the latest." 

Tad nearly swallowed his hand in a prodigious yawn. 
"So we did. Better send them a wire this morning." He 
blinked again and stood up. 

The comb in Mickey's hand clattered to the dresser. She 
whirled to face him, awful realization creeping over her. 

"What do you mean, send a wire?" 

"What's so hard to figure out about that?" Tad laughed 
easily. "We're staying awhile, so we let them know." 

"Staying? But we're not staying. We're going home. 
We came down here to have some fun. We've had it. Now 
we leave." 

"Whoa, Mickey, slow down," he replied. "After the 
showing we made last night, we should go back now? Don't 
be ridiculous!" 

All the fears that had held Mickey at dinner last night 
returned threefold; for every head she lopped off, two 
came to take its place. Tad was staying! That was plain, 
unadulterated fact, and 
there was nothing she could 
do to varnish it over. 

She might have said 
more, if the landlady from 
the landing below hadn't 
called Tad's name with a 
shout that echoed from 
every wall. Tad ran out 
of the room and down the 
steep stairs. He came 
hurrying back, tearing open 
a letter he held, stopping in 
the doorway to read it. 

"Mickey! Look! We've 
gone and done it already." 

He advanced towards 
her, flourishing a gray sheet 
of writing paper. Mickey 
read it through tears that 
magnified every word. It 

was addressed to Mr. Tad Byron, care of Uncle Jim Riley, 
Radio City. 

"Would it be convenient for you and your partner, Miss 
Crail, to attend a lawn party we are giving tonight? The 
messenger is waiting for a reply." It was signed "Marion 
Van Biddle." 

"And don't," Tad said, "tell me you've never heard of 
the Van Biddies." 

Only too well, Mickey recognized the name. It stood, in 
New York, for Park Avenue with a capital "P," a name 
even Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jr., would find hard to ridicule. 

"We're going and that's final," he said, racing out to de- 
liver his acceptance to the messenger, leaving Mickey to 
choose between Poughkeepsie without Tad and the Van 
Biddies with him. 

When he returned, she made up her mind. "Tad, I'm 
staying. Rather than throw you to the debutante wolves, 
I'Jl stick around and see that they don't take advantage 
of your kind disposition." 

"How nice!" Tad's lip curled in imaginary scorn. 
"Then you'll be around when I call for help?" 

"Absolutely." And why not? she thought. It would be 
something to tell the relatives about later. 

Byron and Crail looked much more like a young society 
pair than two scared amateurs when they arrived at the 
Van Biddle Westchester estate that night. Tad, in his white 
palm beach jacket and black pants, might have stepped 
straight from the Harvard Club. Mickey wore the precious 
dinner dress she had made for herself at the beginning of 
the summer. With it went a matching white chiffon jacket, 
and pinned to the left shoulder Tad's contribution to the 

44 



If you haven't started this thrilling 
story, turn back the page and begin 
"Amateurs at Life." It's the story 
of two young people, even as you 
and I, who had the courage to do 
the things in radio which perhaps 
you yourself have always wanted 
to do. It's an absorbing tale of 
adventure and love in radioland. 



evening — a corsage of violets. Tad was always thoughtful. 
The Van Biddies' daughter, Marion, was waiting for 
them when they arrived. 

"Hi!" she waved from the veranda. "Don't tell me your 
names. I know — I went to the broadcast Sunday." She 
came down the steps, her hand outstretched. Marion was 
just what the rotogravure sections of the Sunday papers 
promise debutantes to be — tall, slender, perfectly groomed, 
with ash blonde hair and contrasting eyes of iris blue. 
Worse than that, Mickey found herself liking the hussy. 

"Come on inside and meet the assembled multitudes," 
Marion invited, leading the way into a cool, dimly lit hall, 
and then through a side door onto a porch big enough to 
have accommodated the whole Crail home in Poughkeepsie. 
When the round of introductions were over and with 
frosty mint juleps in their hands, Tad and Mickey wan- 
dered of? to one side. 

"Just why," Mickey demanded "have'we been taken up 
by Westchester society?" 

"Couldn't you tell by the way Marion Van Biddle 
greeted me?" Tad answered. "Seriously I guess this is 

Park Avenue's newest game 
— inviting amateurs they 
like to these festivals and 
asking them to entertain. 
Maybe they do it for 
laughs but tonight they're 
going to get something 
more." 

Marion joined them and 
Mickey smiled before she 
could stop herself. 

"I've just talked things 
over with mother," Marion 
saTd, "and we think it would 
be a swell idea if you two 
stayed as our house guests 
for awhile. Which will you 
have, the left wing or the 
right wing or both?" 

Mickey saw that Tad 

was going to accept and 

she spoke first. "It's terribly nice of you but we can't 

really. For one thing, I didn't bring any clothes with me 

except what 1 have on." 

Marion replied quickly, "1 have a kid sister just your 
size. Not really a kid, she's eighteen. She's gone to Europe 
and there's a whole wardrobe of stuff she's left. Come on 
upstairs and we'll have a look at the collection." 

Mickey found no support at all in Tad. "Swell," he said. 
"Go ahead. I'll wait here for you." 

Without another acceptable objection, Mickey followed 
Marion back into the hall, up a carpeted stairway and into 
a bedroom that belonged by rights to a fairy princess. Or 
a Van Biddle, Mickey thought. Marion was right. In a 
closet large enough to hold two generations of skeletons, 
were dozens of dresses — sports, afternoon, dinner, evening — 
hung in neat rows. 

"Help yourself," Marion said, "while 1 see to it that 
the guests don't walk off with the silverware." 

It was ten before Mickey finished the fascinating game 
of trying on clothes that didn't belong to her. She hur- 
ried back downstairs, suddenly conscious that she'd been 
gone a long time. No one was on the porch. She moved 
through to the lawn that was as smooth as an eighteenth 
green. Down at one corner, near an arbor, she heard voices. 
Picking up her dress, she half ran, anxious to apologize for 
not returning sooner. 
"And when you hold me tight. . . ." 
Mickey recognized that voice almost as soon as she rec- 
ognized the tune. She stopped abruptly. a moment before 
going on, one pace at a time, until she had crept up to the 
fringe of the crowd where she (Continued on page 79) 



SECRETS OF A 



COBINA WRIGHT 



LAST month I started to tell you about a dinner party 
I gave at which Jascha Heifetz, who loves to play 
practical jokes, donned a false moustache and acted 
as butler. 

lie began by almost spilling a glass of water in a very 
elegant dowager's lap. He caught it just in lime and I 
could hardly keep my face straight when I saw her give 
him a terrible look and then instantly set her face into the 
forgiving smile of the socially correct. 

Next he offered a dignified old gentleman some onions. 
The man refused. Heifetz said, "But 1 insist that you eat 
these onions. They would undoubtedly improve your dis-' 
position." The man shot an amazed look at me but I ap- 
parently had not heard the remark and was chatting in 
an unconcerned fashion to the guest on my left! 

And then he got worse and worse. He knocked over the 
salt and insisted that a foreign diplomat throw it over his 
left shoulder. He sloshed the soup about, missing elaborate 
and expensive gowns by inches. He served from the wrong 
side, put his arm in front of the faces of people who were 
talking. 

Of course, everyone thought that both he and I had 
gone completely mad but not a soul recognized the clumsy 
disrespectful butler as Jascha Heifetz, the great violinist, 
until about the fourth course. 

When he finally ripped off the moustache and re-ar- 
ranged his hair they were all amazed and, uncomfortable 
as they had been, they were able to join in the laughter. 
It was fun and made good dinner table conversation at 
other homes for weeks. I'm sure no one minds eating on- 
ions and having salt poured down his back when the reward 
is an evening of Heifetz music! 

I have a very bad social fault; being late. 1 am always 
on time for radio programs, I never miss a rehearsal or a 
train, but I am notoriously late for social engagements. I 
try to break myself of the habit, for when the shoe is on 
the other foot, when I am waiting for guests, I know how 
badly 1 feel. 

What should a hostess do in such a case? How should 
one behave when an excellent dinner is be'ing spoiled wait- 
ing for a belated guest? 

I can but tell you what 1 do. I wait fifteen minutes past 
the appointed time — no dinner can completely spoil dur- 
ing that length of time — then I have dinner announced and 
the rest of us begin. When the guest arrives I say, "I 
thought it better if we sat down. I was sure it would 
make you feel more comfortable to know that we 
had not waited." And then I (Continued on page 68) 



IT'S THE LITTLE TRICKS IN ENTERTAIN- 



INGTHAT PUT A PARTY OVER— THIS 



FAMOUS WOMAN REVEALS THEM 



Lawrence Tibbett, right, 
and Grace Moore, be- 
low, have often enjoyed 
the hospitality of the 
world-famous hostess. 




COAST - TO - COAST HIGHLIGHTS 



WHAT'S NEW ON 
RADIO ROW Con 't 



both legs in an automobile crash. Allyn 
Joslyn, the juvenile, went to the hospital, 
the victim of another motor accident. 
Then Helen Spring slipped and severely 
injured her spine. A week later a Tenth 
Avenue freight train hit Chester Straton 
and smashed his hip. Next Ed Lewis was 
crippled by a fall from a car and shortly 
afterwards Santos Ortega was disabled in 
a street accident. 

By this time, the sponsor was convinced 
a jinx was upon his "troupe and in the 
hope of dodging it transferred his pro- 
gram from the Columbia to the National 
network. The first broadcast in the new 
studio was without incident; everybody 
breathed easier, hoping that the Imp of 
Fate had been banished. But he wasn't. 
He was just hanging around getting ready 
to hand The Court of Human Relations 
cast its worst wallop. Janet Lee, the in- 
genue, thrilled with the prospect of play- 
ing on the very next broadcast her best 
part, was stricken with pneumonia and 
never got the chance. 

SOCIAL GOINGS-ON 

DOMESTIC discord has the Row all 
abuzz these days. Circulate through 
the corridors of Radio City and the Co- 
lumbia building at 485 Madison Avenue 
and almost everybody you meet has a 
tale to whisper about some friend or ac- 
quaintance leaving his frau, or vice versa. 
Really it is very confusing and your re- 
porter, after so many earfuls, is beginning 
to wonder if it isn't the Hollywood in- 
fluence that is corrupting our citizens. Be- 
fore radio stars started migrating to Cali- 
fornia to make movies we were all one 
happy family — now you're lucky if you 
can find one happy family! Or, one you 
can depend upon to iemain happy until 
the next issue of Radio Mirror comes out! 

The splitting of Ray Knight, the 
cuckoo comedian, and his second wife, a 
former Toledo, O., newspaper woman, has 
created possibly the greatest stir. Ray is 
one of the aristocrats of the air. He has 
aspirations to be a dramatist and a flair 
for comedy writing as evinced by his 
radio sketches and his annual contribu- 
tions to the Metropolitan Opera Artists' 
Jamboree which winds up the Met's sea- 
son. 

Knight pals around with opera stars 
and executives and, according to his wife, 
has been also palling around too much 
with Sally Belle Cox, radio's cry-baby im- 
personator. Sally is a protege of Knight's 
and has appeared with him for years, ever 
since he gave her her first job when he 
was production manager of Reter Dixon's 
Bringing Up Junior. Whenever Junior 
wailed it was Sally who did the wailing 
with the help of a pillow. 

The present Mrs. Knight was a widow 
with two children when Ray married her. 
(He fell in love with Ruth when she in- 
terviewed him in her capacity as a re-, 
porter and were married a few weeks 
after that meeting.) Knight has a daugh- 
ter by his first wife, whom he divorced 
years ago. Also a handsome country 
home in Connecticut, which Mrs. Knight 
hopes to acquire in the settlement pro- 
ceedings in addition to a big alimony and 
counsel fees. 

46 



Then there is the parting of the Frank 
Luthers to further upset the equilibrium 
of the Row. Frank, as you know, is the 
tenor of the Men About Town and ap- 
pears in a number of programs, including 
Heart Throbs of the Hills. At one time 
he was that romantic rascal, Your Lover, 
who had feminine bosoms all over the 
country aheaving. Mrs. Luther is Zora 
Layman, also an artist you have admired 
on the networks. Frank and Zora were 
childhood sweethearts and were long mar- 
ried. Until recently Mrs. Luther was con- 
tent to forego her own career and watch 
Frank's progress. The artistic urge, how- 
ever, manifested, itself a couple of years 
ago and Zora since has been striving for 
her place in the sun. Friends of the 
couple attribute their difficulties to clash 
of ambitions and aspirations. 

And Queena Mario, the novel-writing 
Metropolitan diva frequently heard on 
the air, and her, husband, Wilfred Pelle- 
tier, the opera conductor also familiar to 
dialists, are calling it a day . . . While 
from the West Coast come persistent re- 
ports of discord in the Bing Crosby 
menage . . . And the same source would 
have us Easterners believe that Victor 
Young, Al Jolson's maestro, got one of 
those sub rosa Mexican divorces and as 
secretly was sealed to Lee Wiley, the 
radioriole, in Arizona. 

(Continued on page 72) 



CHICAGO 

By Chase Giles 

TED WEEMS found himself in an 
odd spot this fall. He had been signed 
to a contract by the Palmer House to 
bring his orchestra to that famous Chi- 
cago hostelry in September. During the 
summer months the hotel featured the 
famous dance team, Veloz and Yolanda. 
with their own orchestra. The dancers 
did such phenomenal business the hotel 
wanted to keep them on and on, at least 
as long as their popularity held up. The 
.result was that Ted's opening for the win- 
ter season was postponed again and again 
until nobody, even Ted, was really sure 
he was going to get the job at all. So the 
,Weems orchestra kept accepting theater 
and cafe date's around the country well 
into the fall. 

* * * 

All in the period of one month this 
fall Don Briggs left Chicago and radio 
for film work for Universal, Don Ameche, 
First Nighter leading man, and Art 
•Jacobson, leading man of several Chicago 
radio drama series, were called West to 
make film tests. Seems the film folks are 
watching the Chicago radio actors and 
.actresses very closely. And of course we 
mustn't forget that beautiful Dorothy 
Page got her chance at movie stardom 
.while singing over the radio from Chicago 
studios. 

* * * 

One of the most popular men in the 
Chicago radio studios is Francis X. Bush- 
man, film star of a bygone day. Although 
Bushman rode the heights — he spent so 
much during his years of film stardom 
that he himself doesn't know whether it 
was six or nine millions — he has none of 
ithe ego which so often ruins our illusions 
upon meeting famous people. He's one of 
the easiest men to work with in the radio 
business. The boys and girls all like him 



and admire the cheery grin with which 
he faces a new life at the age of fifty-one. 

* * * 

Douglas Hope has been a villain so long 
he's sick and tired of it. He's played in 
Chicago radio dramatics for the last ten 
years but always as a villain. So he wrote 
a scenario one day with himself as the 
leading man, not the villain, in mind. His 
sponsor bought the script and Doug was 
very happy, until the sponsor cast him 
right back in the role of villain again. 
Hope's library of theatrical history in- 
cludes 3,800 volumes, making it one of 
the most valuable private collections in 
the world. 

* * * 

Organist Irma Glen and her husband 
spent a fortune entirely re-doing their 
swank apartment on Chicago's Lake Shore 
Drive. Everything was done in the mod- 
ern manner — trick aluminum chairs, mir- 
rors, covering the walls, built-in radios. 
Then they moved out into the north 
shore suburbs! 

* * * 

Before Sigmund Romberg started his 
new winter radio series a sample broad- 
cast was put on records and sent out to 
Chicago and to other cities so local radio 
editors could have a "preview" of the 
show just the way movie critics do. 

* * * 

Ireene Wicker, the Singing Lady, spent 
her vacation in Europe this fall but her 
husband had to stay right in Chicago 
writing radio shows and acting in them. 

* * * 

Believe it or not, One-Eye Connelly, 
champion gate crasher, failed to crash the 
NBC portals in the Merchandise Mart to 
make his guest appearance on one of the 
National Farm and Home Hour shows. 
He got mixed up in his dates and didn't 
appear until a day later. 

* * * 

For almost a whole week recently Lum 
and Abner didn't talk to each other. They 
couldn't. Abner. (Continued on pageJ3) 



Out for her morning spin. Irma Glen, 
organist heard over the NBC network, 
has a new bike — siren 'n' everything. 




COAST - TO - COAST HIGHLIGHTS 



PACIFIC 

By Dr. Ralph L. Power 

C^OOD old Kris Kringle is harnessing 
P the reindeers tor his annual trip. 
Although most Coast radio entertainers 
will stay at home, many, in memory, 
will want to be transported to other 
places. 

For instance, if they could have their 
way, here's where some would go . . . 
Eddie Albright, veteran KNX announ- 
cer, back to his hometown in Olean, 
New York . . . Barbara Jo Allen, One 
Man's Family, NBC, Paris, where she 
once studied at the university . . . Hazel 
Warner, NBC's Sperry Singer, to her 
Iowa birthplace . . . Cecil Underwood, 
NBC producer, to Spokane where he 
lived from the age of six . . . Glendall 
Taylor, to Buffalo, his first home . . . 
Charles Shepherd, KFI, to Boston where 
he was with the old Boston Symphony 
and the pop concerts . . . Bob Swan, 
KFAC, on an ocean trip to remind him 
of navy days . . . Ken Stuart, KJR, back 
lo Alma mammy, Penn State College . . . 
Paul Rickenbacker, CBS, to see the folks 
in Napierville, III., where he was born . . . 
Raymond Paige. CBS, to Wasau, Wis., 
another home town. 

* * * 

"Billie" Lowe, Los Angeles radio 
singer, waited fifteen months and sued 
hubby, Edward Lowe, on charges of de- 
sertion. He left one night and forgot to 
come back . . . Juliette Dunn, KFRC 
songster, and husband, Harrison Holli- 
way, manager of the station, have tossed 
overboard the divorce proceedings . . . 
Julietta Burnett, recently divorced wife 
of Donald Novis, ambling around the 
studios since, hoping to land on the radio 
again or in the movies. 

* * * 

Nick Kenny. New York radio col- 
umnist, made a hit out on the West Coast 
during visiting days, but do you suppose 
the hometowners heard what he said in 
an interview on KFWB in Hollywood? 



He's one of the West Coast's most 
popular program directors. His 
name's Arthur Linkletter and his shows 
are heard over KGB, San Diego. 




Nick said that announcers are vund- 
hags; that Ted Husing isn't overly gifted 
Mth brains; and that David Ross always 
moans about lack of publicity. 

Anyway, that's what George Fischer, 
KFWB pressman, says, and the local 
press grabbed up the story and rushed 
into print. 

* * 4 

Art Linkletter, pearly-toothed radio 
youngster, is back at KGB as program 
director. He left an announcing post 
there when the exposition opened in San 
Diego to announce for the fair. But back 
to the radio station at more salary. He 
did relief announcing while a student at 
San Diego Teachers College and hoped to 
teach English. However, "I yam what I 
yam, a radio mug," says the bright young 
lad of San Diego. 



Larry Crosby, one of Bings brothers, 
has written "Plain Old Me" in collabora- 
tion with Tony Romano, guitarist-singer, 
and Morey Amsterdam, bull fiddler and 
comic. The last two are favored mem- 
bers of Al Pearce's NBC gang. Gossip on 
the Coast says that another brother, Ever- 
ett, who owns a music publishing house, 
turned the tune down. It must be good. 

* * * 

Now that the premieres of the new 
KNX and NBC studios in Hollywood are 
ancient history, the lads and lassies are 
settling down to routine business. The 
grand openings brought out the largest 
number of tuxedos and soup-and-fish in 
years. 

C. C. ( "Cash and Carry") Pyle, of 
sports promotion fame, has moved from 
Chicago to Hollywood and is producing 
swell transcription programs this winter. 

* * * 

One way to get an announcing job on 
the coast is to have the broadcasters hold 
their annual conclave in your city. Lew 
Crosby was valiantly holding forth at 
KVOR. Colorado Springs, when the NAB 
met there in the summer. Naylor Rogers, 
collector of Scotch humor and KNX's 
vice president, heard the boy. Came the 
fall and a new berth at KNX for Crosby. 
He plays tennis, polo and bridge . . . 
dabbled in college, dramatic and stock 
companies . . . likes hot dogs with mus- 
tard. California's bizarre architecture and 
desert sunsets. 

* * * 

Margaret Brayton has been doing 
pretty well for herself. She was doing 
bits on the Shell Chateau. Alice Brady, 
film player, was to take a lead role. But 
she flopped in the wings and Miss Bray- 
ton took her part. 

* * * 

Ken Frogley, news reader over KRKD 
and radio columnist, had a nice write-up 
in a rival sheet. But they dubbed him 
"Scoop Wempf" . . . "after breaking in 
an animal act for an eastern vaudeville 
circuit, he moved into the Fourth Estate 
as a radio critic." Anvwav. Ken can take 
it. 

* * * 

Frederick Stark, KHJ's concert con- 
ductor, has been busy this winter as a 
result of his guest conducting at the 
Hollywood Bowl in the summer. He has 
been lecturing before schools and clubs. 
His Inglewood concerts now number 422 
weekly programs. 



Seems us though John llallam, Kll 
mikeman, is really Bud lliestand but it 
was too difficult for fans to pronounce or 
write. 

* * * 

Marian Mansfield, one-time KNX 
songster but lately in the films, is now 
married to \rthur Rankin, nephew of 
the Barrymore clan. Rankin, an actor, is 
\rthur Rankin Davenport. Marian first 
came to Hollywood as Gertrude Ride- 
nour and has two boys by a previous 
marriage. The Marian Mansfield tag was 
selected as a radio-stage-screen handle. 

* * * 

Congo" Bartlett is an interesting 
character. I le is timely and up to the 
minute. In no time at all, he switched his 
KFAC Voice of Africa program to Congo 
Bartlett in Ethiopia. As I told you not 
long ago, his first name is Sam and he is 
in English M.D. 

* ♦ « 

Robert Waldrop, NBC announcer in 
San Hrancisco, is the latest to journey to 
Radio City. He is a native son — Eureka 
— and twenty-six years old. Probably his 
best known coast mike stint was to an- 
nounce the western edition of Death 
Valley Days. 

* * « 

We have been hearing Rose Dirmann, 
soprano, on CBS from New York. Once 
upon a time she was a popular KFI 
singer, and one of the first around here 
to employ a personal publicity agent. 

* * * 

Some of these days you will hear more 
of Kelman Aiken in radio. Just now the 
lad is studying and singing on Culver 
City's KFVD once a week. By days he 
slings sodas in the Biltmore Hotel coffee 
shop. When the Biltmore staff held their 
annual frolic in the famed Bowl, he sang 
some ballads. This seems to be his par- 
ticular forte, a sort of song stylist in bal- 
ladland, rather than straight popular 
tunes of the day in jazz tempo. Time will 
develop the style, a tonal quality and 
more volume. 

* * * 

Nice work by Harry Stewart, now NBC 
comic in San Francisco. His health 
wouldn't let him go East with Al Pearce's 
gang, so he joined the network force. 

Born in Tacoma, the blond-haired 
blue-eyed young man is Scotch. Of course 
you've heard his lovable and laughable 
characterization as "Yogi Yorgesson.' 
I le's developing others, too. 



Don Craig, who disappeared from the 
KJR staff as singer and announcer, has 
bobbed up in Hollywood. Marshall Sohl. 
former KHJ tenor, is another Seattle 
personality. Both are doing well in Los 
Angeles radio circles. 

« » * 

Frank C. Chamberlin has been boosted 
from continuity scribe to assistant pro- 
duction manager and announcer at 
KROW. His nickname is Duke. 



Midge (Virginia; \Villiams, KFRC's 
colored alto singer, is eighteen years old 
and was born in Portland, Ore. She won 
the staff position through the audition 
route, and is studying in the state uni- 
versity extension division. She hopes to 
make singing her career. 

■ intimied on pat>e 83 J 



RADIO MIRROR'S 
DIRECTORY 



How to write to your favorites 

The last item on each biography tells the city from which the player 
broadcasts. Here are the addresses: 
National Broadcasting Company — 

New York (abbreviated N. Y.): 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 
San Francisco (abbreviated San P.): Ill Sutter St., San Francisco, 
Calif 

Los Angeles (abbreviated L. A.): 555 South Flower St., Los Angeles, 

Calif 
Chicago (abbreviated Chic): Merchandise Mart, Chicago, III. 
Not all the players listed are on the network at the present time. 



HERE ARE THE REST OF YOUR FAVORITE NATIONAL BROADCASTING 
PLAYERS: BIRTHPLACE AI^D DATE; IF MARRIED, TO WHOM; RADIO 
DEBUT; WHERE YOU CAN WRITE THEM: NEXT MONTH LOCAL STARS 



McINTYRE, Frank. Actor, plays "Cap'n Henry" in 

"Show Boat"; born Ann Arbor, Mich.. Feb. 25, 1881; 

unmarried; debut over NBC, 1934. N. Y. 

McKAY, Cheri. Contralto; born Slatington, Pa., 

Dec. 30; married H. A. Sheridan; two sons; debut 

over WFLA, Florida, 1926. CHIC. 

McKINLEY, Barry. Baritone. "Dreams Come True" ; 

born Fort Wayne, Ind., Nov. 1, 1913; debut over WLW, 

Cincinnati. 1933. N. Y. 

McLAUGHLIN, Tommy. Singer, "Capitol Family"; 

born Los Angeles, Calif., Sept. 11, 1909; unmarried. 

N. Y. 

McMlchael, Joe. Singer, "The Merry Macs"; born 

Minneapolis. Minn., Jan. 16. 1916; unmarried; debut 

over WCCO, Minneapolis, 1929. CHIC. 

McMICHAEL, Judd. Singer. "The Merry Macs"; 

born Minneapolis, Aug. 1, 1906; married Laurine 

Lehnmg; debut over WCCO, 1929. CHIC 

McMICHAEL. Ted. Singer, "The Merry Macs"; 

bcrn Marshalltown, Iowa, April 4, 1908; married 

Frances Kerr; debut over WCCO. 1929. CHIC. 

McNAMEE, Graham. Announcer ' and commentator; 

born Washington, D. C, July 10. 1889; unmarried; 

debut over WEAF, 1922. N. Y. 

McNAUGHTON. Harry. Comedian; born Surbiton. 

Surrey, England, April 29, 1896; unmarried: debut in 

Armour program, 1933. N. Y 




June Meredith 



Frank Mclntyre 



McNEILL, Don. Master-of-ceremonies, "Breakfast 
Club": born Galena, 111., Dec. 23. 1907; married 
Katherine Bennett. 1931; debut in Milwaukee. Oc- 
tober. 1928. CHIC. 

MEARS, Martha. Contralto, "Kitchen Party" ; born 
Mexico. Mo., July 18, 1910; married Sid Brokaw; debut 
in Columbia. Mo., March, 1931. N. Y. 
MELTON, James. Tenor, "Gulf Headliners" ; born 
Moultrie. Ga., Jan. 2, 1904; married; debut from Roxy 
Theater, July. 1927. N. Y. 

MERCADO, Angell. Leader Mexican orchestra ; born 
Pueblo. Mexico. August, 1888; unmarried; debut over 
NBC, August, 1934. N. Y. 

MERCER. Ruby. Soprano; born Athens, Ohio; debut 
over NBC. April. 1934. N. Y. 

MEREDITH. June. Actress. "Campana First-Night- 
er ; born Chicago, June 8, 1906; unmarried; debut in 
Chicago. March, 1930. CHIC. 

MOODY, Robert King, Jr. Basso with Songsmith's 
Quartet; born Lawrence. Kan., April 14. 1904; married 
Planca de Pinillos; two sons; debut in New York City. 

MONROE. Lucy. Soprano; born New York City, Oct. 
&J.V.?' ""married; -debut over NBC. August, 1933. 
MORIN Sisters. Harmony trio. "Sunset Dreams": 
,,;. c ' yn / l,n,n ''"""• Ind.. March 27, 1911; debut over 
\\SH1 Indiana. August. 1931. Marge, born Con- 
tinental. Ohio. April 26. 1913; debut over WOWO In- 
,!, an ^^ ,ar J c, l- 1928 - Pauline, born Dunn. Ind., Feb. 
24 1909; debut over WSIIT. Indiana. August, 1931. 
All three unmarried. CHIC. 

MORRIS, Willie. Soprano with John Charles Thomas; 
born Mexico Mo.; unmarried; debut Boston when 19 
year*; old. N. Y. 
MORSE. Carlton E. Author, "One Man's Family"; 

&?££&£ .929. J s n AyV 9Mi married: de,,m in 

MULLER. Maude. Mezzo-soprano, ■•'Words and 
Music ; born Alhambra, III.. Dec 19; unmarried; 
&•''"' ° ver .WGN. Chicago, 1930. CHIC. 
NttLY. Henry M. Announcer and narrator, "Down 
.A".-r ,r MH"'"lv?7 : n" y , ' hiladel > jl,ia ' Pa., 1878; debut 
NICHOLS. "Red" Loring. Orchestra leader. "Kel- 
logg ( allege Prom ; born Ogden. Utah. May 8. 190V 
married Wi la Inez Stutwinan. 1927; one daughter- 
debut over WEAF. 1926. N. Y w ' 

NIERMAN. Sidney. Pianist, partner of DieW Piatt • 

S2S. < ^f? , a>rJ r i5 D A? 1 l909 ; m l rr ' e, > *°" "-"-man 
&!«»£' W *'-V. Chicago, October. 1933, CHIC. 
NILSSEN. Sigurd. Basso, "Fireside Recitals": born 

Tre^er^Ne-w A Y„rk K Ci, U ; m ' 1 «.r' 1 : ftv! '^ ^ •"' i "' , 

48 



NOBLE, Ray. Orchestra leader; born Brighton, En- 
gland. Dec. 19, 1903; married Gladys Childers; U. S. 
debut over NBC, Feb. 20, 1935. N. Y. 
NOBLETTE, Irene. Comedienne, partner of Tim 
Ryan; born El Paso, Tex., Oct. 17, 1908; married Tim 
Ryan; debut in San Francisco, 1932. N. Y. 
ODELL, Edna. Contralto; born Marion, Ind., Aug. 8. 
1904; unmarried; debut in Fort Wayne, Ind., 1929. 
CHIC. 

OWENS, Jack. Tenor, "Breakfast Club"; born Tulsa, 
Okla., Oct. 17, 1912: married Helen Streifr; one 
daughter; debut in Wichita, Kan., 1930. CHIC. 
PADGETT, Pat. Comedian, plays "January" in "Show 
Boat", "Pat" in "Pic and Pat"; born Atlanta. Ga. , 
Dec. 29, 1903; married; one son; debut with "Show 
Boat." N. Y. 

PAGE, Dorothy. Contralto; born Northampton, Pa., 
March 4, 1910; unmarried; debut with Paul Whiteman. 
1932. N. Y. 

PAGE, Helen. Actress. "The Hoonnghams" ; born 
Pleasant Hill, Mo.. Sept. 20, 1899; married; one son; 
debut over WCHI. Chicago, 1932. CHIC. 
PAGE, Gale. Contralto, "Fibber McGee and Molly"; 
born Spokane, Wash., July 23, 1910.- married; one son; 
debut in Spokane, Wash., 1932. CHIC. 
PALMER, Kathryn. Soprano. "Morning Devotions"; 
born Duluth, Minn., Nov. 30; unmarried; debut over 
WJZ. 1928. N. Y. 

PARKER, Frank. Tenor; born New York City, April 
29, 1906; unmarried; debut over NBC 1926. N.'Y. 
PARKER, Jack. Tenor, "Men About Town Trio": 
born Englewood. N. J., March, 1896; married Jean 
Jules; one daughter; debut over WMCA, New York 
City, 1928. N. Y. 

PARSONS, Joe. Bass, "Sinclair Minstrels"; born In- 
dianapolis, Ind., 1890; married; two sons, one daugh- 
ter. CHIC. 

PATTON, Lowell. Organist and director, "Morning 
Devotions"; born Portland, Ore., Nov. 28. 1893; un- 
married; debut over KOIN. Portland. N. Y. 




Edna Odell 



Frank Parker 



PAULL, JerL Singer, "June, Joan and Jeri Trio," 
"Breakfast Club"; born Eckatirnoslav, Russia. Aug. 
26. 1916; unmarried; debut over NBC Saturday Jam- 
boree, 1935. CHIC. 

PAYNE, Virginia. Actress. "Ma Perkins" ; born Cin- 
cinnati; June 19, 1910; unmarried; debut in Cincinnati, 
1926. CHIC. 

PEA-RCE, AI. Master-of-ceremonies and comedian ; 
born- San Francisco, Calif., July 25. 1900; married Au- 
drey Carter; debut at San Jose, Calif., in experimental 
days of radio. 1912. N. Y. 

PEERCE, Jan. Tenor. "Radio City Music Hall of the 
Air"; born New York City, June 3; 1904; married: 
one son; debut over WOR. Newark, 1930. . N. Y. 
PENMAN, Lea. Actress, "House of Glass"; born Red 
Cloud. Nebraska. Oct. 4, 1900; married; one son; debut 
in New York City, 1933. N. Y. 

PENNER, Joe. Comedian; horn Nagy Becskerek. 
Hungary. Nov. 11, 1904; married Elinor Mae Vogt; 
debut with Rudy Vallee, 1933. N Y 
PEP-PLE. Ruth. Pianist, "Tone Pictures"; born Ash- 
tabula. Ohio: married Harold Branch; one son; debut 
over WJZ, 1922. N. Y. 

PETERS, Lowell. Tenor. "Southernairs Quartet"; 
born Cleveland. Tenn.. Mar. 5. 1903; unmarried; debut 
over WWJ, Detroit, 1923. N. Y. 

PERRIN, LEE. Orchestra leader: born Poltaza. Rus- 
sia. Feb. 12. 1897; unmarried; debut on Borden Pro- 
gram. Jan. 4. 1935. N. Y. 

PHELPS. William Lyon. Narrator and commentator; 
NBC ?ll4 N Ve Y "" Jan ' 2 ' I86S; debut over 

PHILIPP, Isidor. Concert pianist; born Budapest. 
Hungary. 1863; unmarried; debut over NBC. August. 
1934. N. V ' 

PHILLIPS. Irna. Actress. "Todays Children": born 
Chicago. July 1. 1903; unmarried; debut over WGN 
Chicago, 1930. CHIC. 

PHIL.O. Viola. Soprano, "Radio City Music Hall of 
the Air ; born New York City, Dec. 7. 1905; married 
S e , n . ry A. Schroeder; one son; debut New York City. 



PICKENS SISTERS. Vocal trio; all born Macon, Ga. : 
Helen. July 10. 1909; Patti, Dec. 20, 1915; Jane, Aug. 
10. 1911. Helen is married; Patti and Jane are un- 
married. Debut in June, 1932. N. _Y. 
PITTS, CyriL Tenor, "Music Magic" ; born Marion, 
Ind., Oct. 25. 1905; unmarried; debut over WJZ, 1930. 
CHIC. 

PLATT, Dick. Pianist, partner of Sidney Nierman ; 
born Scotts, Mich., May 22, 1905; unmarried; debut 
over WOOD. Grand Rapids. 1923. CHIC. 
POLLOCK, Muriel. Pianist, partner of Vee Lawn- 
hurst; born Kingsbridge, N. Y., Jan. 21. 1903; unmar- 
ried; debut over NBC, 1927. N. Y. 
PRESCOTT. Allen. Household speaker, "The Wife 
Saver"; born St. Louis, Mo., Jan. 21, 1909; unmar- 
ried. N. Y. 

PREVIN, Charles. Orchestra leader; born Brooklyn. 
N. Y., Jan. 11; unmarried; debut in New York City. 
1927. CHIC. 

PRICE, Norman. Singer, Balladeers Quartet: born 
Berry ville. Ark., Jan. 7, 1901; married; two sons, one 
daughter; debut over KGO, Oakland, Calif., 1924. 
N. Y. 

RAFFETTO, Michael. Actor, "One Man's Family"; 
born Placerville. Calif., Dec. 30. 1900; married; .two 
daughters; debut in San Francisco, 1930. SAN F. 
RAMONA, Singer, "Paul Whiteman's Music Hall": 
born Cincinnati, Ohio, Mar. 11, 1910: unmarried; debut 
over WDAF, Kansas City. 1926. N. Y. 
RAPEE, Erno. Conductor "Radio City Music Hal) 
Orchestra"; born Budapest, Hungary, June 4,-1891: 
married; two sons; debut from Capitol Theater over 
WEAF. New York, 1921. N. Y. 

REISER, AI. Pianist, partner of Lee Reiser; born 
New York City, Sept. 1902; married Elaine Silverberg; 
debut in New York City. 1932. N. Y. 
REISER, Lee. Pianist, partner of AI Reiser; born 
New York City. May 10, 1901; married Sally Thai: 
debut in New York City, 1932. N. Y. 
REISMAN, Leo. Orchestra leader; born Boston. 
Mass., Oct. 11; married Lillian Casler; one son; debut 
over WJZ, Newark, 1921, N. Y. 

REMSEN, Alice. Contralto, "Tuneful Travelogs": 
born London, England, Nov. 24; unmarried; debut in 
New York City, Nov., 1927. N. Y. 
RESER, Harry. Orchester leader; born Piqua, Ohio, 
Jan. 12, 1896; married; two daughters: debut in New 
York City. 1921. N. Y. 

RETTENBERG, Milton. Orchestra leader; born New 
iork City. Jan. 27; married Marion Ross; one child; 
debut in Newark, 1921. N. Y. 

REVELL, Nellie. Columnist and News Commenta- 
tor; born Mar. 13. 1873; widow; two daughters; debut 
over NBC. Sept., 1930. N. Y. 

RICH Irene. Actress; born Buffalo. New York, 
NBC |ii v married; two daughters; debut over 




Irene Rich 



Harry Reser 



RICHARDSON, Ethel Park. Narrator, "Heart 
Throbs of the Hills"; born Decherd, Tex.. Dec. 13. 
1883; widow; three children; debut on transatlantic 
hookun. 1926. N. Y. 

ROBINSON, Rad. Baritone, "King's Men Quartet," 
"Paul Whiteman's Music Hall" ; born Salt Lake City. 
Utah, Nov. 11, 1900; married Hortense Hatch; dehui 
over KHJ, Los Angeles. 1928. N. Y. 
ROBINSON. Wlllard. Orchestra leader, singer; born 
Shelbina. Mo.. Sept. 19, 1899; married; one daughter; 
debut over WDAF, Kansas City. 1924 N Y 
ROLFE, B. A. Orchestra leader; born Brasher Falls. 
New York, Oct. 24. 1879; married; debut in New 
York City, 1925. N. Y. 

ROMANO, Tony. Tenor. "AI Pearce and His Gang" • 
born Madera, Calif., Sept. 3. 1915; unmarried; dehut 
with AI Pearce in 1929. N. Y. 

ROMBERG, Sijrmund. Composer and orchestra con- 
ductor; born Hungary, July 29. 1887; married; dehui 
over NBC. Sept., 1934 N. Y. 

ROSS, Lanny. Tenor. "Show Boat"; born Seattle. 
Wash., Jan. 19. 1906; married Olive White; debut over 

(.Continued on page 771) 






"I enjoy the added zest that comes with smoking a Camel 

Mrs. Jasper Morgan 



// 







When not occupying her town 
house, Mrs. Morgan is at West- 
bury, Long Island. "Mildness is 
important in a cigarette," she 
says. "I'm sure that is one reason 
every one is enthusiastic about 
Camels. And I never tire of their 
flavor." The fact that Camels are 
milder makes a big difference. 



Young Mrs. Jasper Morgan's town 
house is one of the most individual 
in New York, with the spacious charm 
of its two terraces. "Town is a busy 
place during the season," she says. 
"There is so much to do, so much 
entertaining. And the more people 
do, the more they seem to smoke — 

AMONG THE MANY DISTINGUISHED WOMEN 
WHO PREFER CAMEL'S COSTIJER TOBACCOS: 

MRS. NICHOLAS BIDDLE, Philadelphia 

MISS MARY BYRD, Richmond 

MRS. POWELL CABOT, Boston 

MRS. THOMAS M. CARNEGIE, JR., New York 

MRS. J. GARDNER COOLIDGE, II, Boston 

MRS. ERNEST DU PONT, JR., Wilmington 

MRS. HENRY FIELD, Chicago 

MRS. CHISWELL DABNEY LANGHORNE, Virginia 

MRS. JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL, New York 

MRS. POTTER D'ORSAY PALMER, Chicago 

MRS. BROOKFIELD VAN RENSSELAER, New York 

© 1935. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. Winston-Salem, N. C. 



and certainly Camels are the popular 
cigarette. If I'm tired from the rush 
of things, 

Camel revives my energy in a pleasant 
way. And I find their flavor most agree- 
able." Camel spends millions more 
every year for finer, more expensive 
tobaccos. Get a "lift" with a Camel. 




Camels are Milder!. 
,, .Turkish and Dome 



In summer Mrs. Morgan is keenly 
interested in yachting. "Another 
thing that makes me like Camels 
so much," she says, "is that they 
never affect my nerves. I suppose 
that is because of the finer tobac- 
cos in Camels." Smoking Camels 
never upsets your nerves. 



..made from finer, more expensive tobaccos 
Stic. ..than any other popular brand 






Sylvia of Hollywood Will 




Your Figure for Tomorrow's Styles 




Read the Table of Contents of this Great Beauty Book 

DECIDE HOW YOU WANT TO LOOK 

DIET AND EXERCISE FOR GENERAL REDUCING 

WHEN FAT IS LOCALIZED— Too Much Hips, Lumps of Fat on 
the Hips, Reducing Abdomen, Reducing the Breasts, Firming 
the Breasts, Fat pudgy Arms, Slenderizing the Legs and Ankles, 
Correcting Bow-legs, Slimming the Thighs and Upper Legs, Re- 
ducing Fat on the Back, Squeezing off Fat, Where There's a Will, 
There's a Way — to Reduce 

REDUCING FOR THE ANEMIC 

GAIN FIFTEEN OR MORE POUNDS A MONTH 

IF YOU'RE THIN IN PLACES— Enlarge Your Chest, Develop 
^our Legs 

PEOPLE WHO SIT ALL DAY— "Desk Chair Spread," Drooping 
shoulders. Luncheon Warnings! 

THE "IN-BETWEEN" FIGURE 

KEEP THAT PERFECT FIGURE 

CLOTHES TIPS FOR STRUCTURAL DEFECTS 

A FIRM, LOVELY FACE 

CORUECTING FACIAL AND NECK CONTOURS— Off with That 
Double Chin! Enlarging a Receding Chin, Slenderizing the Face 
and Jowls, Refining Your Nose, Smoothing Out a Thin, Crepey 
Neck, "Old Woman's Bump" 

SKIN BEAUTY DIET AND ENERGY DIET 

BEAUTIFUL HANDS AND FEET 

ACOI'IRE POISE AND GRACE — OVERCOME NERVOUSNESS 

ADVICE FOR THE ADOLESCENT— To Mothers— To Girls 

DURING AND AFTER PREGNANCY 

THE WOMAN PAST FORTY 



The Beauty Secrets of Hollywood's 
Glamorous Stars Now Revealed 
by the Famous Madame Sylvia 

Haven't you often wondered how the gorgeous screen stars of 
Hollywood keep their flattering figures and their smooth velvety 
complexions? Certainly you have. And it may encourage you to 
know that these famous actresses are faced with problems identical 
to yours. They, too, find themselves getting too fat on the hips, 
abdomen, arms, legs and ankles. Or they may realize that they 
are actually getting skinny. Or they may notice that their skins 
are becoming muddy and blotchy. 

Yet the stars of Hollywood always appear fresh, glamorous and 
radiant in their pictures. And contrary to public opinion the 
movie cameras are more cruel than flattering. But very often when 
a Hollywood star is in need of beauty treatment she turns to the 
foremost authority on the feminine form — Madame Sylvia. 

Sylvia of Hollywood, as she is often called, is the personal 
beauty adviser to the screen colony's most brilliant stars. It is she 
who guards and preserves the exquisite charms of the screen's 
awe-inspiring beauties. It's she who transforms ordinary women 
into dreams of loveliness. 

And now Sylvia has put all of her beauty secrets between the 
covers of a single book. In No More Alibis you will find all of the 
treatments and methods which have made her a power in Holly- 
wood. You will find out how to reduce your weight 15 pounds a 
month — or gain it at the same rate. You will find out how to mold 
your body into beautiful proportions — how to acquire a firm, 
lovely face — how to keep your skin clear and attractive. 

In this great book Sylvia names names. She tells you the very 
treatments she has given your favorite screen stars. And she tells 
you how you can be as lovely as the stars of Hollywood — if not 
lovelier! 

Read the table of contents of this book carefully. Notice how 
completely Sylvia covers every phase of beauty culture. 
And bear in mind that Sylvia's instructions are so simple 
that they can be carried out in your own room without 
the aid of any special equipment. 

No More Alibis gives you the very same informa- 
tion for which the screen stars have paid fabulous 
sums. Yet the price of the book is only $1.00. If un- 
obtainable from your local department or book 
store, mail the coupon below — today. 



Sign and Mail Coupon for this Amazing Book TODAY 




Macfadclen Book Company, Inc. 
J Dept.WGIS, 1926 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

(Send me, postage prepaid, the book, "No More Alibis" 
of Hollywood. I enclose $1.00. 



by Sylvia 



I City. 

L 




COOKING 



By MRS. MARGARET SIMPSON 



They're Ed East, right, 
and Ralph Dumke, left. 
We got their favorite 
hamburger recipe for 
you and even got them 
to pose while enjoy- 
ing the popular snack. 
For the "Sisters of the 
Skillet," sponsored by 
Charis Corp., see page 
52 — I o'clock column. 



FOR THE SISTERS 
OF THE SKILLET 



YOU'VE all listened to the Sisters of the Skillet give 
their screwy household advice over CBS this fall. 
They're the boys, you know, who suggest propping 
up the raisins in raisin cake with toothpicks so they won't 
fall to the bottom, and who offered this novel method of 
splitting the peas for split-pea soup: Imbed the peas on 
lumps of dough stuck to the wall, then throw safety razor 
blades at them. 

Well, some of their ideas about food sound just as hay- 
wire. But they're serious about them! For instance, Ed 
wants his six-o'clock dinner cooked at noon and placed in 
the refrigerator so it will be nice and cold when he's ready 
to eat it. Ralph loves oyster stew, but can't stand the oys- 
ters — gives them to Ed. Ed says the best potatoes are 
those boiled in sea water, which saves the absent minded 
cook from wondering whether or not she has added salt. 
And Ralph likes his cheese sandwich buttered on the out- 
side. 

Take the matter of cold food, Ed's preference. He doesn't 
like hot dishes, not only because they burn his tongue but 
because he thinks heat impairs flavor. Anyhow, he ex- 
plains, everyone uses left over roast in the form of cold 
sliced meat and transforms cooked vegetables into cold 
salad, so he feels he is not so different from most folks at 
that. He even likes cold hamburger, and when the Sisters 
described their pet hamburger recipe I had to agree that, 
hot or cold, it should be swell. 

Skillet Hamburgers 
1 pound ground round steak 

1 paor 

Minced green vegetables 
Salt, pepper, paprika. 
The catch in this recipe is the addition of the vegetables, 



which form about half the bulk of the meat. Minced on- 
ions, for a starter, of course, and after that the Sisters let 
their imaginations run away with them and add anything 
they can find in the garden — parsley, celery and celery tops, 
chives, spinach, lettuce, cabbage, green pepper, tomato. If 
they are near an herb garden they include sage and thyme, 
basil and marjoram. Chop vegetables fine, drain off mois- 
ture and add, with the egg, to the meat and mix thoroughly. 
Form into patties, working salt, pepper and paprika into 
each. Ralph maintains that this method of seasoning is 
much better than putting the condiments into the mixing 
bowl. Salt the bottom of a heavy skillet, placed over a 
high flame When the salt browns, pop in the hamburgers, 
brown on one side, turn and brown again. Reduce heat and 
cook to taste. The vegetables will cause the patties to puff 
up into a far more exciting dish than the ordinary ham- 
burger. If sufficient moisture and fat do not cook out to 
prevent burning, add butter, but add it only after the pat- 
ties have browned. And if you think they don't make good 
sandwiches, just look at the Sisters' picture! 

With the hamburgers, Ed suggests the sea water potatoes. 
This method he explains, he learned from an old fisherman 
while cruising on Long Island (Continued on page 71) 



If you think you know all the different ways of treating 
potatoes, write me for that delicious potato loaf recipe and 
you'll learn a new trick. Also, I'm still at your service in 
digging up your favorite star's recipe. Write to Mrs. Mar- 
garet Simpson, RADIO MIRROR, 1926 Broadway, New York, 
and don't forget to mention what you want, enclosing a 
self-addressed stamped envelope to insure a prompt reply. 

51 



RADIO MIRROR 



We Have With Us— 



RADIO MIRROR'S 

RAPID 

PRO GRAM 

GUIDE 

LIST OF STATIONS 



BASIC 


SUPPLEMENTARY 


WABC 






WADC 


WOOD 


WHEC 


WOKO 


KRLD 


KTSA 


WCAO 


WBIG 


KSCJ 


WNAC 


KTRH 


WSBT 


WGR 


KLRA 


WMAS 


WKBW 


WQAM 


WIBW 


WKRC 


WSFA 


WWVA 


WHK 


WLAC 


KFH 


CKLW 


WDBO 


WSJS 


WDRC 


WDBJ 


KGKO 


WFBM 


WTOC 


WBRC 


KMBC 


WDAE 


WMBR 


WCAU 


KFBK 


WMT 


WJAS 


KDB 


wcco 


WEAN 


WICC 


WISN 


WFBL 


KFPY 


WLBZ 


WSPD 


WPG 


VVGLC 


WJSV 


KVOR 


WFEA 


WBBM 


KWKH 


KOH 


WHAS 


KLZ 


KSL 


KM OX 


WLBW 


WORC 
WBT 


CO AS 


WDNC 






WALA 


KOIN 


KFBK ; 


KHJ 


KGB 


KMJ 




KHJ 
KFRC 


KMT 
KWG 


CANADIAN 


KOL 


KERN 




KFPY 


KDB 


CKAC 


KVI 


KHJ 


CFRB 



HOW TO FIND YOUR PROGRAM 

1. Find the Hour Column. (All time given is Eastern Standard 
Time. Subtract one hour for Central Standard time, two for 
Mountain time, three for Pacific time.) 

2. Read down the column for the programs which are in black 
type. 

3. Find the day or days the programs are broadcast directly after 
the programs in abbreviations. 

HOW TO DETERMINE IF YOUR STATION IS ON THE NETWORK 

I. Read the station list at the left. Find the group in which your 

station is included. (CBS is divided into Basic, Supplementary, 

Coast, and Canadian; NBC — on the following pages — into Basic, 

Western, Southern, Coast, and Canadian.) 

2. Find the program, read the station list after it, and see if your 
group is included. 

3. If your station is not listed at the left, look for it in the addi- 
tional stations listed after the programs in the hour columns. 

4. NBC network stations are listed on the following page. Follow 
the same procedure to locate your NBC program and station. 



5RM. 



6 P.M. 



4P.M. 



3 P.M. 



12 
NOON 



IRM. 



2RM. 



12:00 

Salt Lake City 
Tabernacle: Sun. 
J/ 2 hr WABC and 

network 

Voice ot Experi- 
ence: Mon. Tues. 
Wed. Thure. Fri. 
K hr WABC 
WCAO WNAC 
WDRC WCAU 
WEAN WJSV 



12:15 

The Gump5: Mon. 
Wed. Fri M hr. 
Basic minusWADC 
WKBW WFBM 
KMBC WFBL 
WSPD WJSV 
WHAS Plus WBNS 
KFAB WCCO 
WHEC WNAC plus 
Coast 



12:30 

Musical Foot- 
notes: Sun. M 
hr. WABC WNAC 
WKBW WBBM 
W K K C W H K 
KRNT CKLW 
KMBC WHAS 
WCAU WJAS 

KMOX WJSV 

WBNS WCCO 

"Mary Marlin": 
Mon. Tues. Wed. 
Thurs Fri. J4 hr. 
Basic plus Coast 
plus KLZ WCCO 
KSL 



12:45 

"FiveStar Jones:" 

Mon. Tues. Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. y hr. 
WABC and net- 
work 



1:00 

Church of the Air: 

Sun. y 2 hr. WABC and 

network 

Carlton and Shaw: 

Mon. M WABC and 
network 



1:15 

Alexander Semmler: 

y hr. Mon. WABC 
WCAOWMBRWQAM 
WDBO WSJS WDAE 
WGST WPG WBRC 
WDOD WBIG WTOC 
WNOX KLRA WREC 
WALA WDSU WCOA 
WMBD WDBJ 



1:45 

Sisters of the Skillet: 

Sun. y hr. Basic minus 
WGR CKLW WFBL 
WSPD plus WJR 
WFAB WGST WBNS 
WNOX WREC WDSU 
KOMA WMBG WIBX 
KRLD KTRH WDBJ 
WTOC "WICO KLZ 
WHEC KTSA WBRC 
WCCO KSL WORC 
WBT plus Coast 



The two mad com- 
ics, Dumke and East, 
are back once more 
— and with a spon- 
sored program, too 
— Sundays at I :45. 
Housewives will do 
well not to take their 
cooking hints, which 
consist of the wrong 
way to do everything 
but laugh at their 
jokes. 



2:30 

Down by Herman's: 

Sat. y 2 hr. WABC and 

network 

American School of 

the Air: Mon. Tues. 

Wed. Thurs. Fri. V 2 hr. 

WABC and network 



2:45 

Happy Hollow: Mon. 
Tues. y hr. WABC and 
network 

Blue Flames: Sun. y, 
hr. Basic minus WGR 
WKRC CKLW WDRC 
WJSV WHAS KMOX 
plus WQAM WDAE 
WGST WBT KVOR 
WBNS WOC WESG 
WNOX KLRA WREC 
KOMA WMBD 
WMBG WTOC WSBT 
WIBX WSJS WJR 
WDOD KRLD WBIG 
KTRH WLAC WDBO 
WDBJ WICC KWKH 
KLZ WHEC KTSA 
KSCJ WIBW KFH 
KGKO WCCO WISN 
WLBZ KSL WORC 
WDNC WALA 



The America n 
School of the Air is 
with us for another 
full season and with 
lots of new plans to 
make it wo rth a 
classroom's collec- 
tive while to tune in 
each week day . . . 
A new hot harmony 
team is the Blue 
Flames, Sunday af- 
ternoons. 



3:00 

Philharmonic Sym- 
phony of N. Y.: Sun. 
two hr. WABC WADC 
WOKO WCAO WAAB 
WBBM WHK CKLW 
WDRC WFBM KMBC 
WJAS WEAN KMOX 
WFBL WSPD WMBR 
WQAM WDBO WDAE 
KHJ WGST WPG 
WLBZ WBRC WICC 
WBT WBNS KRLD 
WSMK KLZ WBIG 
KTRH KFAB KLRA 
WSJS WFEA WREC 
WCCO WALA CKAC 
WLAC WDSU WCOA 
WDBJ WHEC KSL 
KWKH KSCJ WMAS 
WIBX WMT WWVA 
KFH WORC WKNB 
WKRC WDNC WIBW 
WTOC KOMA WHAS 
KGKO KOH KOIN 
KVI KOL KGB WDOD 
WNOX KVOR KTSA 
WSBT WHP WOC 
WMBG WKBW 
KERN WCAO WJSV 
KFPY 

Women's Page: Tues. 
Hour WABC and net- 
work 

The Oleanders: Thurs. 
y hr. WABC and net- 
work 

Orchestra: Wed. Vi hr 
WABC and network 
Blue Flames: Fri. M 
hr. 

Football: Sat. }4 hr. 
WABC and network 

Tuesdays from 
three to four is set 
aside exclusively for 
you gals at home. 
Featured by Lois 
Long, it will have 
well-known advisers 
to women's problems 
■ — notables like Mad- 
ame Sylvia and Hat- 
tie Carnegie. There'll 
also be music by a 
piano duet and the 
Yacht Club Boys. 



4:00 

Visiting America's 

Little House: Mon y 

hr.WABC and network 
The Grab Bag: Fri. y 2 
hr. WABC and network 

4:15 

Chicago Varieties: 

Mon. y 2 hr. WABC 
WADC WOKO WCAO 
WKBW WGR WBBM 
WKRC KRNT CKLW 
WDRC WFBM KMBC 
KFAB WHAS WCAU 
WJAS WSPD WJSV 
WMBR WQAM 
WDBO WDAE KHJ 
KDB WGST WPG 
WLBZ WBRC WDOD 
KVOR WBNS KRLD 
KLZ WBIG WHP 
KTRH WNOX KLRA 
WFEA WREC WCCO 
WALA CKAC WDSU 
WCOA WMBG 
WDBJ WTOC KWKH 
KSCJ WSBT WMAS 
WIBW CFRB WIBX 
KFH WSJS WORC 
KVI KFPY WBT 

4:30 

Science Service: Tues. 

y hr. WABC and 

network 

4:45 

Loretta Lee: Wed. M 
hr. WABC and net- 
work 

Tito Guizar: Sat. y 
hr. WABC and net- 
work 

Here's the prob- 
able football lineup 
the rest of the sea- 
son, as scheduled by 
sports announcerTed 
H usi nq: Nov. 9, 
Fo rd ha m vs. St. 
Mary's; Nov. 16, 
Notre Dame vs. 
Army; Nov. 23, Rice 
vs. Texas Christian; 
Nov. 28, Pennsyl- 
vania vs. Cornell. 
That's only CBS, re- 
member. NBC has 
different ideas of 
what makes a foot- 
ball game. 



B R O 



5:00 

Melodiana: Sun. V 2 
hr WABC WOKO 
WCAO WAAB WGR 
WFBL WBBM WKRC 
WHK KRNT CKLW 
WDRC WFBM KMBC 
WHAS WCAU WJAS 
WEAN KMOX WSPD 
WADC WJSV KFAB 
WCCO WHEC CFRB 
Mark Warnow's Or- 
chestra: Fri. y 2 hr. 
WABC and network 



5:15 

The Instrumental- 
ists: Thurs. X A, hr. 
WABC and network 



5:30 

Crumit & Sanderson: 

Sun. y 2 hr. WABC 
WADC WOKO WCAO 
WAAB WGR WHK 
CKLW WDRC WFBM 
KMBC WHAS WCAU 
WEAN KMOX WFBL 
WSPD WJSV WICC 
WBNS WDSU KOMA 
WHEC WMAS KTUL 
WIBX WWVA KFH 
WORC 

Jack Armstrong: 

Mon.Tues.Wed. Thurs. 
Fri. y. hr. WABC 
WOKO WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN WMAS 



5:45 

Og, Son of Fire: Mon. 
Wed. Fri. M hr. WABC 
WCAO WAAB WKBW 
WKRC WJR WHAS 
WJAS WBRC WBT 
WBNS WREC 
Tito Guizar: Tues. 
Thurs. M hr. WABC 
and network 



Tito Guizar, 
charming young 
Mexican singer 
(have you seen the 
swell gallery shot of 
him in this issue?) 
is back on an after- 
noon schedule . . . 
Og, Son of Fire, is 
also back, at 5:45, 
for you kiddies who 
like kid shows, and 
without any blood 
and thunder, as per 
announcement. 



D - 



52 



7 P.M. 



RADIO M IRROR 

8P.M. 9 PM. IORM. 



HPM MIDNIGHT 



6 P.M. 



6:00 

Amateur Hour with 
Ray Perkins: Sun. Yi 
hr WABC WOKO 
WCAO WAAB WKBW 
WBBM WKRC WHK 
CKLW WDRC WFBM 
KMBC WHAS WCAU 
WJAS KMOX WFBL 
WJSV KERN KMJ 
KHJ KOIN KFBK 
KGB KFRC KDB 
KOL KFPY KVVG 
KVI WGST WBT 
VVBNS KRLD KLZ 
WREC WCCO WDSII 
WHEC KSL CFRB 
Buck Rogers: Mori 
1 ues Wed Thurs. Y 
hr WABC WOKO 
WCAO WAAB WKBW 
WKRC WHK CKLW 
WCAU WJAS WFBL 
WJSV WBNS WHEC 
Kaltenborn Edits 

The News: Fri. }4 hr 
WABC and network 
Frederic William 

Wile: Sat. Y hr. 
WABC and network 



6:15 

Bobby Benson: Mon. 
Wed. Fri. ki hr. WABC 
WAAB WGR WCAU 
WFBL WLBZ WOKO 
WDRC WEAN WHEC 
WMAS 

Benay Venuta: Tues 
M hr. WABC and net- 
work 



6:30 

Household Music Box: 

Mon. Wed WABC only 
Smilin' Ed McCon- 

nelhSun. Y. hr. WABC 
WCAO WKBW WKRC 
WFBM WCAU WJAS 
WEAN WFBL WJSV 
WBBM WHAS KMOX 
WAAB KRNT WJR 
WDRC KFAB WBRC 
WBT WBNS KRLD 
KLZ WLAC WDSU 
WHEC KSL WWVA 
KFII plus Coast 



6:35 

Vanished Voices: Mon. 
Wed. Yi hr. WABC 
WOKO WCAO WAAB 
WKBW WCAU WFBL 
WJSV WHEC WORC 



6:45 

Voice of Experience: 

Sun. H hr. WABC 
WADC WCAO WAAB 
WKBW WBBM 
WKRC WHK CKLW 
WDRC WFBM KMBC 
WHAS WCAU WJAS 
WEAN KMOX WFBL 
WSPD WBT WCCO 
WHEC WWVA 



7:0D 

Alexander Woollcott: 

Sun. Yi hr. Basic minus 
WADC WEAN WSPO 
plus KRNT KFAB 
KLZ WCCO KSL plus 
coast 

Myrt and Marge: 
Mon. Tues. Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. Bapic minus 
WKBW C K I W 
WFBM KMBC WBBM 
WHAS KMOX plus 
WJR WQAM WDBO 
WDAE WBT WTOC 
WWVA 

The Atlantic Family: 
Sat Yi hr. WABC 
WADC WCAO WNAC 
WGR WHK WDRC 
WCAU WJAS WEAN 
WFBL WNBF WMBR 
WQAM WDBO WDAE 
WICC WBT WBNS 
WBIG WHP WMBG 
WDBJ WHEC WTOC 
WMAS WIBX WWVA 
WSJS WORC WCBA 
WFBG WGB1 WBRE 
WORK 



7:15 

Jimmy Farrell: Tues. 
Thurs. M hr. WABC 
and network 
Lazy Dan: Fri. yi 
hr. WABC and net- 
work 



7:30 

Phil Baker: Sun. Hhr. 
WABC and network 
Kate Smith: Tues 
Wed. Thurs. Yi hr. 
Basic minus WSPD plus 
WMBR WGST WBT 
KRLD WDSU WKBN 
Singin' Sam: Sun. M 
hr. WABC WADC 
WOKO WCAO WNAC 
WGR WBBM WKRC 
WHK KRNT WJR 
WDRC WFBM WHAS 
KFAB WCAU WJAS 
WEAN KMOX WFBL 
WSPD WJSV WCCO 



7:45 

Boake Carter: Mon 

Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
Y, hr. WABC WCAO 
WNAC WGR WBBM 
WHK CKLW KMBC 
WHAS WCAU WJAS 
KMOX WJSV WBT 
WCCO WDRC WEAN 
KRLD KOMA WFBL 
WKRC 



Fi rs t — we have 
Myrt and Marge, 
charging into still 
another season, and 
with a new setting: 
a west coast picture 
studio. At least, 
that's what they 



promise 



And 



have you heard that 
Vanished Voices at 
6:35? ... The first 
day Boake Carter's 
new book went on 
sale over two thou- 
sand copies were 
pu re ha sed — some- 
thing of a record, it 
seems . . . Phil Baker, 
with Hal Kemp's 
music, is reaching 
for a new high Sun- 
day nights over his 
CBS network. Have 
you heard his new 
stooge, who is only 
fourteen years old? 



8:00 

Eddie Cantor: Sun. Yi 
hr. WABC and network 
Guy Lombardo: Mon. 
Yt hr. WABC WOKO 
WCAO WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU WJAS 
WEAN WFBL WJSV 
WIIBF WCHS WSCS 
WPG WICC WBT 
WDOD WESG WDNC 
WBIG WHP WNOX 
KLRA WREC WLAC 
WDSU WMAS WSJS 
WMBG WDBJ WIBX 
WORC WHEC KWK1I 
WWVA 

Lavender and Old 
Lace: Tues. Yi hr. 
Basic plus KRNT 
KFAB 

Harvester Cigars: 

Thurs. Y hr. Basic 
plus KRNT KFAB 
WBNS WSMK WCCO 

Red Horse Tavern: 

Fri. Yi hr. WABC 
WOKO WNAC WGR 
WDRC WEAN WICC 
WORC WLBZ WHAS 
WFBL WHEC WCAU 

Club Columbia: Sat. 
Yi. hr. WABC WADC 
WOKO WNAC WGR 
WHK WJR WDRC 
WFBM WJAS WEAN 
WFBL WSPD WJSV 
WQAM WDBO WDAE 
WGST WLBZ WICC 
WDOD KVOR WBNS 
WOC KLZ WBIG 
KTRH WNOX KLRA 
WREC WISN WCCO 
WALA KOMA WMBD 
WMBG WDBJ WHEC 
KSL WTOC KWKH 
KSCJ WSBT WMAS 
WIBW CFRB WIBX 
KFH KGKO WORC 



8:30 

Leslie Howard: Sun. 
Yi hr. Basic plus Coast 
plus WBRC WBT 
WBNS KRLD KLZ 
KTRH KLRA WCCO 
WLAC WDSU KOMA 
WHEC KSL KTUL 
WRFC WOWO 

Pick and Pat: Mon 

'/2 hr. Basic plus 
KFAB WLBZ WICC 
WBT WOWO WHP 
WMBG WHEC WMAS 
WORC 

Packard Presents 
Lawrence Tibbett: 

Tues. Yi hr. Basic plus 
Coast plus Canadian 
plus a supplementary 
network 

Burns and Allen: 

Wed. Yi hr. WABC and 

network. 

Atwater Kent Hour: 

Thurs. Y hr. Basic plus 
coast plus WGST 
WLBZ WBT KRLD 
KLZ WMBR WREC 
WQAM WCCO WDSU 
KOMA WDBO KSL 
KTSA WDAD WLAC 

Broadway Varieties: 

Fri. Y hr. Basic plus 
WGST WBRC WBT 
WBNS KLZ WCCO 
WDSU WMBG KSL 
WMAS plus coast 



9:0) 

Ford Sunday Eve- 
ning Hour: Sun. 1 hr. 
Basic plus supple- 
mentary plus coast 
Lux Radio Theater: 
Mon. one hr Basic plus 
Coast plus KRNT 
KFAB WQAM WDAE 
WGST WBRC WICC 
WBT WBNS KRLD 
KLZ KTRH KLRA 
WREC WCCO CKAC 
WISN WLAC WDSU 
KOMA WDBJ WHEC 
KSL KTSA CFRB 
WORC WNAX 
Camel Caravan: Tues. 
Thurs. Yi hr. WABC 
and network 
Chesterfield Presents: 
Wed. Sat. Yi hr. WABC 
and network 
Hollywood Hotel 

Fri. one hr. Basic Plus 
Coast minus KFPY 
KFBK KDB Plus Sup 
olementarv minus 
WWVA WGLC Plue 
Canadian Plus WOWO 
WGST WBNS KFAB 
WREC WDSU KOMA 
WMBG WMBD KTUL 
WACO WNAX WNOX 
WIBX WKBH 



9:30 

Fred Waring: Tues 
one hr. Basic Plus Coast 
Plus Supplementary 
minus KDB KWKH 
WSBT WWVA Plus 
WGST WBNS KFAB 
WREC WDSU KOMA 
WMBG KTUL WACO 
WNAX WKBN KNOX 
WMBD Plus Canadian 
Ray Noble: Wed. Yi 
hr. WABC and network 
"To Arms for Peace:" 
Thurs. Yi hr. Basir 
minus WGR CKLW 
WCAU WJAS WEAN 
WFBL KMOX plus 
WDOD KRLD KTRH 
WLAC KWKH KLZ 
WHEC KTSA WMBR 
WCCO WISN KSL 
WBT KRNT WJR 
WGST WBRC WBNS 
WHP WREC WDSU 
KOMA WMBG KFH 
plus Coast 
Marty May-Time: 
Sat Yi hr. WABC and 
network 



Hearye! Hear ye! 
The month's biggest 
news is the signing 
of Leslie Howard for 
a Sunday night dra- 
matic series. He's 
on at 8:30, following 
Eddie Cantor. Which 
sort of runs the Ma- 
jor's Amateur Hour 
a bit of stiff compe- 
tition . . . Leslie 
claims he will give 
no private inter- 
views, but we're bet- 
ting RADIO MIR- 
ROR will soon carry 
a big feature about 
him . . . Chesterfield 
is under way again, 
with Andre Kostela- 
netz's music and Lily 
Pons and Nino Mar- 
tini. Nino, inciden- 
tally, is making a hit 
in his new Fox pic- 
ture. 



10:00 

Wayne King. Lady 
Esther: Sun Mon. Y 
hr. WABC WADC 
WOKO WCAO WAAB 
W K B W W B B M 
WKRC WHK CKLW 
WDRC WFBM KMBC 
WHAS WCAU WJAS 
KMOX WFBL WSPD 
WJSV KERN KMJ 
KHJ KOIN KFBK 
KGB KFRC KDB 
KOL KFPY KWG 
KVI WBNS KRLD 
KLZ KFAB WCCO 
WDSU WIBW 
Alemite Hour: Thurs 
Y> hr. WABC and net- 
work 

Ric'iard Himber with 
Stuart Allen: Fri. Yi 
hr. WABC WADC 
WOKO WCAO WAAB 
WKBW WBBM 
WKRC WHK CKLW 
WDRC WFBM KMBC 
KFAB WHAS WCAU 
WJAS KMOX WFBL 
WSPD WJSVJ WGST 
WBT WBNS WCCO 
WDSU WSBT KFH 
California Melodies: 
Sat. Y 2 hr. WABC anj 
network 



10:30 

Guy Lombardo: Sat. 
?4 hr. WABC and net- 
work 

The March of Time: 
Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. 
Fri. Y hr. Basic minus 
WGR WJSV plus 
WCCO WDSU KRNT 
KFAB WSPD WISV 
plus coast 



10:45 

Poet's Gold: Wed. Y 
hr. WABC and network 
Clyde Barrie: Thurs. 
M hr. WABC and net- 
work 

Mary Eastman: Fri. 
Y hr. WABC and net- 
work 



The Socony Sketch- 
book, having lost 
Johnny Green, went 
and changed its 
name to The Flying 
Red Horse Tavern, 
a bit of sponsor 
whimsy tying up 
with the sale of gas- 
oline. Freddie Rich's 
orchestra, Willie 
Morris as songstress, 
and Jim Harkins as 
a genial master of 
ceremonies form the 
foundation of the 
new show. Willie has 
sung with John 
Charles Thomas, 
Hawkins has been 
heard on Town Hall 
Tonight. There'll also 
be a s ixtee n-voice 
male chorus . . . Ray 
Noble for Coca Cola 
now at 9:30 every 
Wednesday, and 
Marty May Satur- 
days same time, sus- 
taining. 



11:00 

Abe Lyman Orches- 
tra: Mon .-at. WABC 
and network 
Dance Orchestra: 
Fri. WABC and net- 
work 

Guy Lombardo: 
Thursday Yi It. WABC 
and network 



11:30 

Dance Orchestra: 

Sun. WABC and net- 
work 

Jerry Freeman's Or- 
chestra: Mon. Fri. Yi 
lir. WA HC and network 
Dance Orchestra: 
I'ues. Sat WABC and 
network 

Dance Orchestra. 
Wed. Fri. WABC and 
network 



Rebroadcasts for 
Western Listeners: 



11:00 

Myrt and Marge: 

Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs 
Fri. Y. hr. WBBM 
WFBM KMBC WHAS 
KFAB KMOX WGST 
WBRC KRLD KLZ 
KTRH KLRA WREC 
WCCO WALA WSFA 
WLAX WDSU KOMA 
KSL plus Coast 



11:30 

Pick and Pat: Mon 

Yi hr. KRNT WFBM 
WHAS KMOX KERN 
KMV KHV KOIN 
KFBR KGB KFRC 
KDB KOL KFPY 
KWG KVI KLZ KSL 
Voice of Experience: 
Sun. Y hr. KLZ 
KSL KERN KMJ 
KHJ KOIN KFBK 
KGB KFRC KDB 
KOL KFPY KWG 
KVi 

Camel Caravan: Tues. 
Thurs. Y 2 hr. KVOR 
KLZ KOH KSL plus 
Coast 

Burnsand Allen: Wed. 
Yi hr. KVOR KLZ 
plus Coast 



12:00 

Richard Himber: Fri. 
y 2 hr. KERN KMJ 
KHJ KOIN KFBR 
KGB KFRC KOI! 
KOL KFPY KWG 
KVI KLZ KSL 



One of the most 
imposing programs 
of the new season is 
heard Thu rsd a y 
nights. It's the World 
Peaceways show, 
calling for a united 
front against an- 
other world war ca- 
tastrophe. With the 
speakers, singers, 
and orchestra con- 
tributing their ser- 
vices at reduced 
pay and Squibb — 
the sponsor — limit- 
ing the advertising 
talk to a bare mini- 
mum — this half hour 
marks a new era in 
shov/manship possi- 
bilities. Tune in, 
you'll like it. 




53 



ADIO MI RROR 



NOON 



IRM 



2 P.M. 



3 P.M. 



4PM. 



5PM 



6PM. 



12:00 

Tastyeast Op- 
portunity Mati- 
nee: Sun. Vi hr 
Network 

Simpson Boys: 
T u e s . Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. Sat. 
M hr. WJZ and 
network 
12:15 

Merry Macs: 
T u e b . Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. M hr 
Genia Fonaii- 
| ova, soprano . 
Sat. X hr. Net- 
work 

I 12:30 
Radio City 
Music Hall: Sun. 
] Hour — Network 
I National Farm 
land Hour 
I H ou r : Mob. 
Tues. Wed. 
J Thurs. Fri. one 
[ hr. WJZ and net- 
I work 



1:30 

Highlights of 
the Bible: Sun. 
y> hr. Network 
Orchestra: Mon. 
Fri. H hr. WJZ 
and network 



1:45 

Happy Jack: 

Mon. Tues. Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. }i hr, 
WJZ and network 



2:00 

The Magic Key 
of RCA; Sun. 1 
hr. Basic plus 
Western plus South- 
ern plus coast 



2:30 
NBCMusicGuild: 

Mon. Thurs. one 
hr. WJZ and net- 
work 

Golden Melodies: 
Tues. Yi hr. WJZ 
and network 
National Congress 
of Parents and 
Teachers Associa- 
tion: Wed. Y 2 hr. 
WJZ and network 



2:45 

General Federa- 
tion of Women's 
Clubs: Fri. M hr. 
WJZ and network 



LIST OF STATIONS 

BLUE NETWORK 





BASIC 


WE 


STERN 


WJZ 


WSYR 


KSO 


WPTF 


KPRC 


WBAL 


WHAM 


KWK 


WTMJ 


WEBC 


WMAL 


KDKA 


WREN 


KSTP 


WRVA 


WBZ 


WENR 


KOIL 


WWNC 


WJAX 


WBZA 


WGAR 


COAST 


WKY 
WBAP 


WFLA 
WOAI 
WLS 




KOA 


KGO 




KOMO 




KDYL 


KFI 

KGW 




KH<? 



WEAF 
WTAG 
WBEN 
WCAE 
WTAM 



KSTP 
WTMJ 



WIOD 
WFLA 
WWNC 



RED NETWORK 

BASIC 

WWJ WGY WEEI 

WLW ( WJAR KSD 

WSAI \ WCSH WDAF 

WFBR 
WRC 

WESTERN 

WEBC WKY KVOO 

KPRC WOAI WFAA 

SOUTHERN 

WIS WJAX WSB 

WPTF WMC WSM 

WRVA WJDX WSMB 



CANADIAN 



COAST 



CRCT 



CFCF 



KHQ 
KDYL 
KOA 



KGO 
KHJ 
KGW 



WHO 
WMAQ 
WOW 
WTIC 



WBAP 
KTAR 



WAPI 
WAVE 



KOMO 
KFI 



11:30 

Major Bowes' 
Capitol Fam- 
ily: Sun. one 
hr. WEAF and 
network 



12:15 

Honeyboy and 
Sassafras: 

Mon. Tues 
Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
Sat. \i hr- 



12:30 

University of 
Chicago Dis- 
cussions: Sun. 
y 2 bi Network 
Merry Mad- 
capsl Mon: 
Tues. Wed. 
Thurs Fri .~ai. 
Yi hr. Network 



1:00 

Road to 
Romany: Sun. 
y hr. WEAF and 
network 



1:15 

Orchestra: Tues. 
Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
li hr. WEAF and 
network 



1:30 

Words and 
Music: Sun. 
y hr. (network 
listing not 
available) 



1:45 

NBC Music 

Guild: Tues % 

hr WEAF and 

Network 

Airbreaks: 

Thurs. H hr. 

WEAF&network 



2:00 

Bible Dramas: 

Sun M hr. WEAF 
and network 
Revolving Stage: 
Mon. }/ 2 hr. 
Orchestra: Thurs. 
Y 2 hr. WEAF and 
Network 

The Magic of 
Speech: Fri. H hr. 
WEAF and net- 
work 



2:30 

Temple of Song: 

Sun. y 2 hr. WEAF 
and Network 
The South Sea 
Islanders: Mon. y 
hr. WEAF and 
network 

Weekend Revue: 
Sat. Y 2 hr. WEAF 
and Network 



3:00 

The Silver Flute: 

Tues. y 2 hr. WJZ and 
network 

Old Skipper: Sat. y 2 
hr. WJZ and network 

3:15 

Pine Mountains So- 
cial: Sun }/ 2 hr. WJZ 

and network 
Sketch: Wed. M hr. 
Network 

3:30 

Sunday Vespers: Sun. 

y 2 hr. Network 
Vaughn de Math: 

Mon. Thurs, Fri. y 
hr. WJZ and Network 
Nellie Revell: Tues. 
y. hr WJZ and net- 
work 

Music Magic: Sat. Y 2 
hr WJZ and network 
Spotlight Revue: 
Wed. y 2 hr. WJZ and 
network 

3:45 

The King's Jesters: 

Mon. Tues. Fri. Y, 
hr. WJZ and network 



Two new sponsored 
shows on Sundays: 
Magic Key at 2:00 
one of the most gi- 
gantic collection of 
star material any 
series has ever pre- 
sented; Pine Moun- 
tain Social, just the 
opposite in its home- 
ly presentation of 
Kentucky mountain 
gossip, and back- 
woods music. 



4:00 

Betty and Bob: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
yi hr. Basic minus 
KSO KWCR WREN 
Plus Coast Plus WOAI 
WLW WFAA WTMJ 
KSTP KVOO WKY 
KPRC 

Willard Robison's Or- 
chestra: Sun. y 2 hr. WJZ 
and network 

4:15 

Songs and Stories: 

Mon. y hr. Network 
Jackie Heller: Fri. y 
hr. WJZ and network 

4:30 

NBC Radio Guild: 

Thurs. one hr. WJZ and 

Network 

Castles of Romances: 

Tues }/ 2 hr. WJZ and 

Network 

Ray Heatherton: Wed. 

M hr. WJZ and network 

4:45 

General Federation ot 

Women's Clubs: Fri 

y hr. WJZ and Network 

Those King's Jesters 
are scheduled for 
three afternoon shows 
a week. They're 
George Howard, Fran- 
cis Bastow, John Ra- 
vencroft, and Ray Mc- 
D ermott. They've 
found a new soloist, 
Marjorie Whitney, a 
contralto they discov- 
ered in Nebraska . . . 
National Congress of 
Parents and Teachers 
again at 2:30. 



5:00 

Roses and Drums: Sun. 

y 2 hr. Basic plus WLW 
KTBS WKY KTHS 
WBAP KPRC WOAI 
Crosscuts from Log of 
Day: Wed. y 2 hr. WJZ 
and Network 
American Medical As- 
sociation Program: 
Tues. }4 hr. WJZ and 
network 



5:15 

Jackie Heller: Sat. M hr. 

Network 



5:30 

Singing Lady: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
M hr WJZ WBAL WBZ 
WBZA WHAM KDKA 
WGAR WJR WLW 



5:45 

Gabriel Heater: Sat. 
Sun. \i hr Basic plus 
WLW WAVE WSM 
WMC WSB WAPI 
WJDX 

Little Orphan Annie: 
Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. 
Fri. Sat. Y hr. WJZ 
WBZ WBZA KDKA 
WJR WBAL WHAM 
WMAL WRVA WJAX 
WCKY WFLA WIOD 



NATIONAL 



3:00 

June, Joan and Jerri: 

Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs 
M hr. WEAF and net- 
work. 



3:15 

Oxydol's Ma Perkins: 

Mon. Tues Wed Thurs. 
Fri.y hr. Basic minus 
WJAR WHO WDAF 
WMAQ WOW— plus 
WKBF WSM WSB 
WAPI WAVE WSMB 



3:30 

Penthouse Serenade, 

Jack Fulton: Sun. y 

hr. Basic plus Coast 

Vic and Sade: Mon. 

Tues. Wed Thurs. 

Fri. Basic minus WLW 

plus KYW KFI 

NBC Music Guild: 

Sat. % hr. WEAF and 

network 



3:45 

The O'Neills: Mon. 

Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. 

M hr. Basic plus KYW 

WDAY KFYR WEBC 

KSTP WTMJ plus 

Coast 

Mario Cozzi: Fri. y 

hr. WEAF and network 



4:00 

Carol Deis, soprano: 

Sat. M hr. WEAF and 
Network 

Woman's Radio Re- 
view: Mon. Tues Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. WEAF and 
Network Y 2 hr. 



4:30 

Songs: Sun. Y hr. 

WEAF and Network 
Masquerade: Mon. Tues. 
Wed. Thurs. Fri. M hr. 
WEAF and Network 
Our Barn: Sat. y 2 hr. 
WEAF and network , 



4:45 

Orchestra: Mon. J4 hr. 
WEAF and network 
Betty Marlowe and 
her Californians: Wed. 
Fri. y a hr. 



Penthouse Serenade 
has changed its sing- 
ing star from Don 
Mario to Jack Fulton. 
Jack rose to fame via 
Paul Whitema n and 
the fact that he was 
once a roommate of 
Bing Crosby's. Listen 
to June, Joan, and 
Jerri at 3:00 week- 
days for an amusing, 
tuneful bit of light- 
ness . . . And Mario 
Cozzi is still on Fri- 
days at 3:45. 



5:00 

Al Pearce and His 

Gang: Mon. Wed. Fri. 

y hr. Basic minus WEEI 

plus KYW WHIO plus 

Coast 



5:30 

Temple of Song: Sat: y 
hr. WEAF and Network 
Dream Drama: iSun. 

y hr. Basic minus WHO 

WOW 

Tom Mix Program: 

Mon. Wed. Fri. M hr. 
Basic minus KSD WDAF 
WHO WOW 
Matinee Musicale: 

Thurs. y hr. WEAF and 
Network 



5:45 

Music by Al Goodman: 

Sun y hr. Basic plus 
KYW WHIO WIRE 
Clara, Lu 'n' Em: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
y hr. WEAF and net- 
work 



Big news for after- 
noon addicts: The 
O'Neills are back on 
the air, over a WEAF 
network, at 3:45. All 
the beloved charac- 
ters are still in the 
program, even if they 
have a different spon- 
sor . . . Al Pearce got 
a big send-off on his 
new program from 
Amos 'n' Andy. 



{Please turn to page 66) 



RADIO MIRROR 




But 

secretly 
site cried 
over lier 
pimply 
skin 



WHO? ME? WHY, 
YOU KMOW X HATE 
BOYS -~ WHY, X 
WOULDNT BE. 
SEEM WITH 
ONE" 




but; actually; of courseshe: 

WANTS TO BE PRETT/ AND POPULAR- 



nast>; horrid hicmes/ if 

T COULD OMLySETTSlDOF, 
THEM / 




POOR CHILD-THOSE PIMPLES 
HAVE HURT HER LOCKS, AND t 
MADE! HE.R MISS SO MANY /? 
GOOD TIM ES/ f 




THOUGHT* \( ITWASUU5THER. S. 
^YDIDNT ^ PIMPLY 5KIN. I MU5T K 



X 

MARY 

LIKE THE B0Y5// ASK HER HOWSHE KEEPS 
MT 50 LOVELY AND CLEAR 
HOW ' 



Don't let adolescent pim- 
ples cramp YOUR style 

From 13 to 25 years of age, im- 
portant glands develop. This 
causes disturbances throughout 
the body. The skin becomes over- 
sensitive. Harmful waste prod- 
ucts get into your blood. These 
poisons irritate the sensitive skin 
and make pimples break through. 

Physicians prescribe Fleisch- 
mann's Yeast for adolescent pim- 
ples. This fresh yeast clears skin 
irritants out of the blood. Pim- 
ples vanish ! Eat it 3 times a day, 
before meals, until skin clears. 



by clearing skin irritants 
out of the blood 



55 



RADIO M IRROR 



6PM 



7PM 



8PM. 



9PM 



10PM 



IIPM. 



MIDNIGHT 



6:00 

Canadian Grena- 
diers: Sun. H hr. 
U. S. Army Band: 

Mon. \i hr. Network 
Animal News Club: 

Wed. Fri M hr. 
WJZ and network 



6:30 

Grand Hotel: Sun 

Y% hr Basic plus 
Coast plus WTMJ 
KSTP WEBC 
Press Radio News: 

Mon Tues Wed. 
Thurs Fri. Sat. WJZ 
and network 



6:35 

Morin Sisters: Sat. 
M hr. WJZ and net- 
work 



6:45 

Lowell Thomas: 

Mon. Tues Wed. 
Thurs. Fri. M hr. 
WJZ WGAR WLW 
CRCT WBZ WBZA 
W S Y R W B A L 
WHAM W M A L 
WJAX WFLA 
KDKA WJR CFCF 
WIOD WRVA 



RED T 



6:00 

Catholic Hour: Sun. 

1 o hr. Network 

Flying Time: Mon. 

Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. 

y± hr. WEAF and 

network 



6:15 

Mid-week Hymn 

Sing: Tues M hr. 

Network 

Orchestra: Wed. M 
hr. WEAF and net- 
work 



6:30 

Invitation to the 
Dance: Sun Y 2 hr 
WEAF and Network 
Press Radio News: 
Mou. Tues. Wed. Thurs. 
Fri. Sat. 



6:35 

Stanley High: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
Yi hr. WEAF and net- 
work 



6:45 

Billy and Betty: 

Mon. Tues. Wed. 
lliurs. Fri. WEAF only 
Merry Macs: Sat. 
Ji hr. WEAF and net- 
nork 



7:00 

Jack Benny with 
Johnny Green's Or- 
chestra: Sun. V 2 hr. 
Basic Plus Western 
minus WWNC WBAP 
WLS plus WKBF 
WIBA KFYR WIOD 
WTAR WAVE WSM 
WSB WSMB KVOO 
WFAA KTBS WSOC 
WDAY WMC 
Easy Aces: Tues. Wed. 
Thurs. M hr- WJZ and 
network 



7:15 

Ivory Stamp Club: 

Mon. Wed. Fri. M hr. 
Basic minus WGAR 
WREN plus WFIL 
WXYZ WMT (sta- 
tion list incomplete) 
Master Builder Pro- 
gram: Sat. M hr. WJZ 
and network 



7:30 

Bob Ripley with Ozzie 
Kelson and Harriet 
Hilliard: Sun. y 2 hr 
WJZ and network 
Lum 'n' Abuer: Mon. 
Tues. Wed Fri. M 
hr. WJZ WBZ WBZA 
WSYR WENR 
Message of Israeli 
Sat. K hr. WJZ and 
network 



7:45 

Dangerous Paradise: 

Mon. Wed. Fri M hr. 
Basic Plus KTBS WSM 
WSB WFAA WKY 
WI.W WHO 
Phil Regan: Thurs. 
M hr. WJZ and net- 
work 



7:00 

K-7: Sun. y 2 hr. WEAF 
and network 
Amos 'n' Andy: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. Thurs. 
Fri. Vi hr. WEAF and 
network 

Thornton Fisher: Sat. 
V. hr. WEAF WTIC 
WTAG WJAR WCSH 
KYW WHIO WRC 
WGY WBEN WTAM 
WWJ WMAQ KSD 
WOW WIBA KSTP 
WEBC WDAY KFYR 
WRVA WPTF WTAR 
WSOC WWNC WIS 
WJAX WIOD WFLA 
WAVE WMC WAPI 
WJDX WSMB WSB 
WCAE WSAI WIRE 
WSM 



7:15 

Uncle Ezra's Radio 
Station: Mon. Wed. 
Fri. WEAF and net- 
work 

Popeye, The Sailor: 
Tues. Thurs. Sat. M 
hr.WEAF and network 



7:30 

Sigurd Nilssen, basso 

Graham McNamee: 

Sun. *i hr. WEAF 
WTAG WJAR WCSH 
WRC WGY WTAM 
WWJ WSAI WMAQ 
KSD WOW WBEN 
Music Is My Hobby: 
Thurs. y. hr. WEAF 
and network 



7:45 

The Fitch Program: 

Sun. %. hr. Basic minus 
VVEEI WDAF nlus 
CFCF KYW WIRE 
You and Your Gov- 
ernment: Tues. M hr 



8:00 

NBC String Sym- 
phony: Sun. % hr 
WJZ and network 
Fibber Mc Gee and 
Molly: Mon. Y 2 hr 
Basic plus WFIL 
WCKY WLS WMT 
Eno Crime CiU'.'s: 
Tues. y 2 hr. Basic 
minus WHAM WENR 
plus WLW WLS 
Life Saver Show: 
Wed. y 2 hr. Basic 
Nickelodeon: Thurs. 
Yi hr. WJZ and net- 
work 

Irene Rich: Fn. »4 
hr. Basic minus WJR 
WGAR WENR KWK 
plus WLS WSM WMC 
WSB WAVE 



8:15 

Bob Crosby: Fri. 
K hr. WJZ and net- 
work 



8:30 

Evening in Paris: 

Mon. J^ hr. Basic plus 

WFIL WCKY WLS 

WMT 

Welcome Valley, 

Edgar A. Guest: Tues. 

Yi hr Basic plus 

WCKY WMT 

House of Glass: Wed. 

Y 2 hr Basic minus 

WBZ KWK plus WMT 

WCKY 

Kellogg Co liege 

Prom, Ruth Etting: 

Fri. Vjj hr. Basic plus 

WFIL WCKY WMT 



9 00 

Melodious Silken 

Strings Program: 

Sun. y 2 hr. Basic plus 
Western minus WTMJ 
KSTP WBAP WEBC 
WOAI plus WLW 
WIOD WAVE WSM 
WSB WMC WJDX 
WSMB WFAA KTBS 
KTHS 

Sinclair Minstrels: 
Mon f£ hr. — Basic 
plus Western plus WSB 
WIBA WDAY KFYR 
WFAA WIS WIOD 
WSM WSMB WJDX 
KTBS KVOO WSOC 
WTAR WMC KOA 
WLW WMT WAPI 
KDYL 

N.T.G. and his Girls: 
Tues. y 2 hr. Basic plus 
Coast plus WLW WLS 
WMT 

John Charles 
Thomas: Wed. % hr 
Basic plus Coast plus 
WIRE WMT WCKY 
Death Valley Days: 
Thurs Ys hr. — Basic 
minus WENR plus 
WLW WLS 
Palmolive Beauty 
Box: Fri. one hr. (net 
work listing unavail- 
able) 

9:30 

Walter Winchell: Sun. 
!4 hr. Basic 
Princess Pat Players: 

Mon. y 2 hr. Basic 
Helen Hayes: Tues. 
J^ hr. Basic 
National Barn Dance: 

Sat- Hour. Basic plus 
WLS WKBF 

9:45 

Niela Goodelle: Sun. 

M hr. Basic plus 

WCKY 



NATIONAL 



8:00 

Major Bowes Ama- 
teur Hour: Sun. Hour 
Complete Red Net- 
work 

Hammerstein's 
Music Hall: Mon. y 2 
hr. Basic 

Leo Reisman: Tues 
y 2 hr Basic minus 
WSAI plus Western 
Minus WOAI WFAA 
plus Southern minus 
WRVA WAVE plus 
WKBF WIBA WDAY 
KFYR WSOC WTAR 
One Man's Family: 
Wed. y 2 hr. Complete 
Red Network plus 
KTBS WCKY KFYR 
WDAY WIBA 
Rudy Vallee: Thurs. 
Hour Complete Red 
Network plus KFYR 
WDAY 

Cities Service: Fri. 
Hour — Basic minus 
WMAQ plus Western 
plus Coast plus CRTC 
Lucky Strike Pre- 
sents: Sat. one hr. 
Basic plus Western 
plus Coast plus WIBA 
KTBS WMC WSB 
WAPI WJDX WSMB 
WAVE 

8:30 

Voice of Firestone: 

Mon. y 2 hr. Basic 
plus Western minus 
WFAA WBAP KTAR 
plus Southern minus 
WRVA WAPI . plus 
WDAY WKBF WIBA 
KFYR WSOC WTAR 
KTBS 

Lady Esther, Wayne 
King: Tues. Wed. Y 2 
hr Basic minus WFBR 
plus WTMJ KSTP 
WKY KPRC WSM 
WSB WMC WOAI 
WKBF WSMB WBEN 
WTIC WBAP KVOO 



9:00 

Manhattan Merry Go 

Round: Sun. Yi hr. 
Basic plus WTMJ 
KSTP WEBC CFCF 
KFYR plus Coast 
A and P Gypsies: 
Mon. y 2 hr. Basic 
Ben Bernie:Tues. Y 2 hr. 
—Basic plus WTMJ 
KSTP WDAY KFYR 
WMC WSB WBAP 
KTBS KPRC WOAI 
KOA WFI KVOO 
Town Hall Tonight: 
Wed. Hour — Basic plus 
WIS WJAX WIOD 
WSB WTMJ KTBS 
KPRC WOAI KSTP 
WRVA WSMB KVOO 
WKY WEBC WPTF 
WSM WMC 
Show Boat Hour: 
Thurs. Hour — Com- 
plete Red Network 
Waltz Time: Fri. Y 2 
hr Basic minus WEEl 
G-Men: Sat. Yi hr. 
Complete Red Network 

9:30 

American Musical 

Revue: Sun. y 2 hr. 

Complete Red Network 

Grace Moore: Mon. 

Y 2 hr. Complete Red 

Network 

Eddie Duchin: Tues. 

Y 2 hr. Complete Red 

Network 

True Story: Fri. J^ 

hr. Basic Plus Coast 

plus WHIO 

Shell Chateau: with 

Al Jolson: Sat. One 

hr. Basic plus Coast 

Plus KYW WHIO 

WIBA KSTP WEBC 

WDAY KFYR WTMJ 

WRVA WPTF WWNC 

WIS WJAX WIOD 

WFLA WTAR WSOC 

KGIR KGHL KFSD 

KTAR KOYL 



10:00 

Sunday Evening at 
Seth Parker's: Sun. 
Yi hr. WJZ and net- 
work 

Raymond Knight: 
Mon 1 hr WJZ and 
network 

Wendall Hall: Tues. }4 
hr. WJZ and network 
NBC Symphony Or- 
chestra: Thurs. one 
hr WJZ and network 
Meetin' House: Fri. 
}/ 2 hr. WJZ and net- 
work 

10:30 

Armco Ironmaster: 

Sun. y 2 hr. WJZ and 

network 

Heart Throbs of the 

Hills: Tues. y 2 hr. 

WJZ and Network 

Stones of History: 

Wed. }/ 2 hr. WJZ and 

network 

Carefree Carnival: 

Sat. Y 2 hr. WJZ and 

network 

The youngest of 
the Crosby brothers, 
Bob, starts a new 
radio program about 
the same time you 
read this. Tune him 
in Fridays at 8:15 
. . . Ulderico Mar- 
celli, conductor on 
the Fibber McGee, 
Molly program, was 
born in Rome, edu- 
cated in Chile, be- 
gan his career in 
Ecuador, and now 
lives in Chicago. 



10:00 

General Motors Con- 
certs: Sun. Hour. Basic 
plus KYW WHIO 
WIRE WIBA KFYR 
WTAR WSOC KTHS 
KTBS KGIR KGHL 
KFSD plus Southern 
plus Western plus Coast 
Contented Program: 
Mon. Y 2 hr. Basic plus 
Coast plus Canadian 
plus KSTP WTMJ 
WEBC KPRC WOAI 
WFAA KFYR WSM 
WMC WSB WKY 
Swift Hour with Sig- 
mund Romberg and 
Deems Taylor: Tues. 
Y 2 hr. Basic plus 
Western plus Coast 
Log Cabin Show: 
Wed. y 2 hr. WEAF 
and network 
Whiteman's Music 
Hall: Thurs. Hour- 
Complete Red Network 
plus WDAY KFYR 
KTBS KTHS WIBA 
Campana's First 
Nighter: Fri. H hr. 
BasK plus Western 
minus KVOO WBAP 
KTAR plus WSMB 
WMC WSM WSB 



10:30 ' 

Great Moments in 
History: Tues. }/ 2 hr. 
WEAF and Network 
Mills Brothers: Fri. 
Yi hr. Basic plus South- 
ern plus Western plus 
Coast 



11:00 

Joe Reichman Or- 
chestra: Mon. }/ 2 hr. 
Songs: Wed. Y 2 hr. 
Ink Spots: Fri. >i 
hr. WJZ and Network 
Orchestra ■*<> . ' 
Dorothy Lamour: 
Mon. Wed. Fri. Ji hr. 
WJZ and network 

11:15 

Shandor: Sun. M hr. 
WJZ and network 
Ink Spots: Mon. Fri. 
WJZ and network 

11:30 

Orchestra: Sun. Y 2 br. 
Orchestra: Mon. }/ 2 hr. 
Orchestra: Tues. Y br - 
Orchestra :Tburs Y 2 \l*. 

James Melton re- 
cently signed as a 
star of Friday night's 
Palmolive Beauty 
Box. The contract 
calls for 108 weeks 
of singing . . . Soon 
you'll again hear 
Frank Simon's band 
playing for Armco. 
He's on Sundays 
again, but at a later 
hour— 10:30 . . . 
Helen Hayes, hav- 
ing exchanged Hol- 
lywood for radio, 
will soon star in a 
Broadway play . . . 
Stones of History 
has been changed 
to Wednesdays at 
10:30. 



tBLUE 



11:00 

Orchestra: Mon. Yi 
hr. Network 
Orchestra: Wed. J^ hr. 
John B. Kennedy: 
Thurs. y 2 hr. 
Stanley High: Tues. 
M hr. WEAF and Net- 
work 



11:15 

Orchestra: Mon. 
hr. Network 



K 



11:30 

Orchestra: Mon. Wed. 
Fri. H hr. Network 
National Radio 
Forum: Thurs. y 2 
hr. Network 

11:45 

Jesse Crawford: Mon. 
Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. 
Ys, hr. WEAF and Net- 
work 

Biggest news flash 
of the month: Ben 
Bernie, recently di- 
vorced, engaged to 
marry a Chicago 
swimmer, Dorothy 
Wesley! ... The Ed- 
die Duchin-Fire Chief 
program is still with- 
out additional tal- 
ent. Ed Wynn's de- 
mands for weekly in- 
come were not met 
. . . Al Jolson sched- 
uled to leave Shell 
Chateau. His pic- 
ture work's taking 
up a lot of time, 
and besides, he says, 
he's tired out. 



56 



RADIO MIRRO R 




Miss Constance Hall says: 'Toad's Cold Creaai keeps m\ skin clear and fine 



*"»»&**> Under Skin 




See outer skin bloom... Faultless! 



Deep-skin" Cream 

reaches beginnings of 
Common Skin Faults 

What annoys you most when you 
peer into the mirror? 

Blackheads dotting your nose? 
Lines on forehead? Little blemishes? 
If you could only start new — with a 
satin-clear skin! 

And you can! — by putting new life 
into your underskin! There's where 
skin faults begin. And there's where 
you must work to get rid of them. 

Your underskin is made up of tiny 
nerves, blood vessels, glands and fibres. 
Kept active — they rush life to your 
outer skin — free it of flaws. Annoying 
lines, blackheads, blemishes are a sign 
your underskin is losing its vigor! 



Tc 



o keep that underskin pulsating 
with life — stimulate it deep with 
Pond's Cold Cream. Made of specially 
processed oils, it seeps down the pore 



through cloggings of dirt. ..make-up... 
skin secretions. Out they flow — leaving 
your skin fresher, immediately clearer. 
But Pond's Cold Cream does still 
more! Pat in more cream briskly. Cir- 
culation quickens, little glands get 
busy. Now pores reduce, blemishes 
go away, lines begin to fade! 

A double-benefit treatment 

Every Night, pat in Pond's Cold Cream to 
uproot clogging make-up and dirt. W ipe 
off. Now pat in fresh Cream — for under- 
skin stimulation! 

Every Morning, and before make-up, re- 
fresh your skin with Pond's Cold Cream. 
It smooths your skin for powdering. 

Pond's Cold Cream is absolutely oure. 
Germs cannot live in it. 

Special 9-Treatment Tube 

POXD'S,Dpt.Mi3I, Clinton, Conn 1 enclose lot 

(to cover postage and packing) for special tube of 
Pond's Cold Cream, enough for 9 treatments, with 
generous samples of 2 other Pond's Creams and 
5 different shades of Pond's Face Powder. 

Name 



Streets 
City. 



.State. 



Copyright. 1935, Pond's Extract Company 



57 



WHAT DO YOU WANT TO 




KNOW? 



THERE'S plenty to be known about the radio stars, 
especially some of the very new ones. For instance, 
there's little Emily Vaas who won a contract with 
Phil Baker on her thirteenth birthday, and it was her hat 
that clinched the bargain. Phil's very words were: "You're 
hired; but if you take that hat off, you're fired." Phil 
Baker had been looking for a feminine heckler to cooperate 
with Beetle, Bottle and Agnes Moorehead on his new Gulf 
program. It had begun to be quite a problem when Emily 
happened along. 

Miss Bella D., Buffalo, New York— Walter Winchell 
is back in his old Sunday night spot after Cornelia Otis 
Skinner had been pinch-hitting for him. You'll find his 
address listed in our Radio Mirror Directory which starts 
on page 48. 

Eleanor H., Cleveland, O.— Please follow our "Facing 
the Music" articles in Radio Mirror, and you'll soon be 
finding some things about Hal Kemp that you've been 
wanting to know. All you had to do is ask, and voila! — 
a picture of Conrad Thibault and his bride appeared in 
the October Radio Mirror. 1 bet you saw it! 

Lucille, Rochester, New York— Ann Jamison, heard 
on Hollywood Hotel, is Virginia. We had a story about 
Virginia in the October Radio Mirror. Don't tell me you 
missed up on that issue! 

Miss Lena E., Phila., Pa.— Muriel Wilson is the singing 
"Mary Lou" of Show Boat. She is still single although 
she's engaged to Fred Hufsmith, who is also a radio singer. 

J. W. H., St. Paul, Minn.— Jim and Lazy Dan are 
played by one person, Irving Kaufman. Gene Arnold is 
interlocutor for the Sinclair Greater Minstrels. 

Mrs. W. F., Buffalo, N. Y.— All you have to do is write 
and ask. I'm sure Jimmy Melton will send you one of his 
pictures. Address him in care of the National Broadcasting 
Company. Rockefeller Center, New York. By the way, did 
you like the story about Jimmy and his diet on page 30, 
entitled "No More Corporations?" 

Michael S., Dickson City, Pa.— Vaughn de Leath, con- 
tralto, was the first woman to sing over the air. 

58 



Write to the Oracle, RADIO MIRROR, 1926 Broad- 
way, New York City, and have your questions 
about personalities and radio programs answered 



Long famous as a comedian and accordion virtuoso, Phil 
Baker now sings! With him are his four stooges and Hal 
Kemp's orchestra. For Phil Baker's program, sponsored by 
the Gulf Refining Co., see page 53 — 7 o'clock column. 



Miss L. M. B., Chicago, 111. — Thank you for the infor- 
mation on Joe Sanders. Now, here's your reward: Nelson 
Eddy was born in Providence, Rhode Island, on June 29, 
1901. He made his debut as boy soprano in the choir of 
Grace Church there. Later he decided to be a trap drum- 
mer in a boys' orchestra. His father and grandfather were 
whizzes with a drum. His next job was as telephone opera- 
tor in an iron works factory. Then followed a short-lived 
career as a newspaperman and finally he concentrated on 
his voice. Pie made his New York debut in 1931 and has 
been climbing the ladder via stage, radio and movies, ever 
since. Tall, handsome and athletic, Eddy finds relaxation 
in swimming, motoring, tennis, dancing and sailing. He's 
single and at present can be reached in care of M-G-M, 
Culver City, California. 

Miss P. L. N., Baltimore, Md. and Mrs. Minnie W., 
Baltimore, Md. — The above is for you too, ladies. 

Miss Rosalyn G., Ballston Spa, New York — Rudy 
Vallee has business offices at 111 West 57th Street, New 
York City. I am sure your letter will be given prompt 
attention. 

William H., Canton, 111. — Ruth Etting was born in 
David City, Nebraska. She was studying clothes designing 
at the Academy of Fine Arts in Chicago when she went to 
the Marigold Gardens to sketch the costumes. Her ambi- 
tion to sing won her a place in the chorus. Then one night 
a male principal failed to appear and Ruth, the only one 
familiar with the lyrics, was called upon to take his place. 
She made so good she retired then and there both as a 
chorus girl and an art student. And of course you know 
the rest. 

Joan B., Spokane, Washington — The lady in question 
was born Katherine Elizabeth Smith but everyone knows 
her as Kate Smith. How do you like her new program? 
She's with the A. & P. Gypsies now, you know. 

B. K. B., St. Louis, Mo.— The Oracle apologizes, B. K.. 
for the mistake. I was wrongly informed. Jack Arnold is 
played by Vinton Haworth. 

Eva H., Chesterville, Ontario — Jerry Cooper is heard 
over the Columbia networks on Wednesdays at 10:45 P. M. 
and Saturdays at 9:30 P. M. 



RADIO MIRROR 



Beauty a la Jessica 
Dragonette 

(Continued from page 41) ' 

skin, this is perfect for you, since it gives 
an even more definite line than an eye- 
brow pencil. 

Jessica blends other things besides lip- 
stick for her personal use. "I love per- 
fume." she said. "I love it so much that 
1 seldom wear only one scent at a time. 
I often blend two or three on my skin — 
perfume, of course, should always be ap- 
plied to the skin, never the clothes. 
Cleopatra, so I've heard, was such a past 
master at this art that she had perfume 
injected just under the skin, so that it 
really became an actual part of her body! 
It's probably just a legend, but it's an 
interesting idea. 

"What are my favorite perfumes?" 
She smiled and shook her head. "That 
should be every woman's personal beauty 
secret! Like the truly chic Frenchwoman, 
I say 'Never tell your perfume.' Choose 
the ones you like best for your own in- 
dividuality, and never tell! By blending 
two or three scents, you'll have an abso- 
lutely different combination. Then vary 
these combinations with the gown and 
the occasion. Keep it light and elusive. 
Perfume on a woman should be just like 
the perfume of a flower. When you hold 
a carnation in your hand, you get only 
faint whiffs of it, as though born on a 
shifting breeze. 

"Flowers, too — all kinds and in all sea- 
sons — are an essential part of a woman's 
personality. 1 believe that's one place 
where we American women show a lack 
of imagination. We wear such standard- 
ized flowers. Your little boutonniere 
needn't always be a gardenia, your eve- 
ning corsage needn't be luxurious orchids. 
For example, I like to wear a nosegay of 
marigolds in the lapel of my little yellow 
Schiaparelli suit. And for evening wear, 
I look for the one flower in all the world 
which was meant to go with a certain 
color and a certain material." 

If you find it hard to get real flowers 
at all times in your community, you 
might try the little trick used by Ann 
Sothern, the film star, who uses floral per- 
fume on the artificial flowers she wears, 
matching the scent to the flower. And if 
you're looking for a truly individual per- 
fume. 1 can tell you of at least three de- 
lightful ones which are coming out this 
fall, and you will probably be the first in 
your community to discover them! 
There's one created especially for eve- 
ning wear, another which is warm and 
elusive at the same time, and still an- 
other which presents one of our favorite 
floral odors in a new and exciting guise. 

Another subtle use of perfume is found 
in the enchanting varieties of eau de 
cologne now being offered. One company 
put out a set of three widely different 
odors in one case, to suit your mood at 
the moment. Another has the most gen- 
erous-sized bottle of good cologne at a 
reasonable price that I've ever seen. You 
know, of course, that cologne-water is 
not just a scent, but a relaxing and ex- 
hilarating application for tired muscles 
and overheated bodies, so this large bottle 
is ideal for such unsparing use. 

Do let me tell you more about these 
fascinating new products and the names 
of the preparations which Jessica Dragon- 
ette mentions. Just send a- stamped, self- 
addressed envelope with your query to 
Joyce Anderson, Radio Mirror, 1926 
Broadway, New York City. 



/ 



■ vs 



"LUi. 



DEEPER SUDS 

MAKE DISHWASHING 

a tuck am/ mtuf 



THE more suds there are to do the 
work, the easier any washing job 
becomes. Silver Dust actually gives 
far deeper suds than any ordinary 
soap. The pictures at the right give 
dramatic proof of this, in a test that 
anyone can make. 

The real proof is in the dishpan. If 
you hate dishwashing ... if you want 
to make the job really quick and easy 
. . . Silver Dust is the soap for you. Get 
it today! 




Put a teaspoonful of your favor- 
ite dishwashing soap in a dish- 
pan with two cups of water. 
Swish it around for about fifteen 
seconds and then pour the water 
and suds into a mason jar. 




Now do the same thing with 
Silver Dust. Note how much 
deeper the Silver Dust suds are. 
They actually overflow! Note, 
too, how close the suds are. 
These active busy little bubbles 
make dishwashing quicker and 
easier than ever before. 




59 



RADIO MI RROR 



cleaning up and cooking does a housewife. 
And you can't cheat on rest, if you want 
to keep your voice clear. 

"A singer must have at least nine hours' 
sleep every night. Why, when 1 have a 
program on Sunday, I never go out on 
Saturday night. Even during the summer, 
1 daren't take a chance cruising over 
night on our boat, the Melody; my sleep 
might be disturbed." 

Jimmy had a couple of months before 
his movie test. Having conquered the 
radio and concert fields, movies and opera 
are the two goals he's now shooting for. 
He's studying hard for the latter. It re- 
mained to prepare his body for the 
former. 

At that time, the banana and skimmed 
milk diet was all the rage. So Jimmy, of 
course, went on that. For a week, yes, a 
full week, with no cheating. AndMar- 
jorie ate bananas and drank milk till she 
hated the sight of them. Not that she 
needed a diet, but just to keep Jimmy 
company, and show him she appreciated 
what a tough job it was. 

That didn't prove satisfactory. Jimmy 
lost only a couple of pounds. And he 
felt sick — really sick. Of course, his voice 
sounded thin and strained. So bananas 
and skimmed milk were out. Then, still 
experimenting, they hit upon another diet. 
Tomato juice and hardboiled eggs — for 
breakfast, lunch and dinner. One of Mar- 
jorie's friends had tried it and claimed it 
worked wonders. All it did for Jimmy 
was to make him feel weak, and as raven- 
ously hungry as a wolf. 

Nothing daunted, they tried another 
stunt. For a few weeks, the Melton cup- 
board was bare of all butter, cream, sweets 
and starches. Then, for a week, Jimmy 
relaxed and ate the food of the pre-diet 
days. Then back on the rigorous diet. 
"After awhile," he said, "I got used to it 
and felt pretty good, but I wasn't losing 
enough. During the week I ate nor- 
mally. I'd gain back most of the weight 
I'd lost the previous week." 

When the time came to take the motion 
picture test, Jimmy just hadn't lost 
enough weight. And he and Marjorie 
were heartbroken. 

"There was no use making a fool of 
myself," Jimmy told me soberly. "So I 
just didn't take the test. It was pretty 
tough, of course, when Marj and I had 
hoped and dreamed and planned so long 
for it, but," with a shrug of his shoulders, 
"that was that." 

A Melton never acknowledges defeat. 
And when two Meltons, Big Jimmy and 
Little Marjorie, make up their minds to 
lick something, it will be licked. Just 
give them a little time. Jimmy decided 
he had been all wrong. After all, he was 
a singer, not a doctor. His job is to sing 
an aria or a tender love song so we'll all 
enjoy it, not to dope out, by trial and 
error, a brand new Melton method of 
reduction. 

So to his doctor he went. First the doc- 
tor examined him. Heart, lungs, blood 
pressure, throat — everything was Okay. 
Then the fun began. 

"What he did to make me lose weight, 
you and anyone in good health can do. 
'What's your height?' was his first ques- 
tion. 

" 'Six feet two/ 1 answered." 

With Jimmy's build, the doctor told 
him his normal weight should be about 
185 pounds. 

" TDo you do any strenuous exercise?' 
he asked. 

60 



No More "Corporations" 

(Continued from page 31) 

" 'No, I exercise lightly. A bit of danc- 
ing, a bit of tennis and swimming, but 
not much.' 

' 'Then you need seventeen calories of 
food a day for every pound of normal 
weight,' he explained. That would make 
it about 3145 calories a day if you want 
to maintain your present weight.' " 

But Jimmy didn't want to maintain 
that weight; he wanted to lose. So, as 
might be expected, the doctor told him to 
eat much less than this 3145 calories. By 
cutting down on his intake, he'd cut down 
his weight. Gradually, he reduced Jimmy 
to about 1899 calories a day. 

"He gave me a list of foods with their 
caloric content," Jimmy told me, "and he 
warned me against cutting out any type 
of food entirely. That was what I had 
been doing on my self-imposed diets, with 
the result that they weakened me and 
affected my voice. You have to have a 
balanced diet." 

Very little seasoning was used in pre- 
paring food. Salt was used in small doses, 
for it maintains fat by checking the flow 
of perspiration from the pores. Onions, 
too, were taboo. 

The doctor said it was a good idea for 
Jimmy to begin dinner with a fresh salad, 
an acid drink or cold Madrilene soup, to 
take the edge off his appetite. Then 
broiled chicken or lean meat or boiled 
fish — never fried — two green vegetables, 
and stewed fruit for dessert. 

Jimmy was to have plenty of water, 
whenever he wanted. Only it isn't healthy 
to wash food down with water instead of 
chewing it. 

Don't think it was easy for Jimmy to 
stick to the diet. There was the time, for 
example, when Jimmy and Marjorie were 
invited to a friend's for dinner. Now 
Jimmy couldn't afford to go off his diet, 
so he explained that if he came, all he'd 
have was some tomato juice. Jimmy 
thinks it's a help to have only fruit juices 
for a few days when you start your diet. 
He says you can drink all you want. It 
seems to shrink the tummy and loosen up 
the fat cells like nothing else does, and 
isn't at all uncomfortable. 

The friends said it was all right. But 
when Jimmy came, they spread before 
the hungry-eyed Meltons a regular feast. 
They had no tomato juice in the house. 
None at all. And they were amazed, yes, 
really insulted, when Jimmy stuck to his 
guns. Finally, they realized he meant 
what he said, and sent out for a bottle 
of tomato juice. 

Every week Jimmy has it all over again. 
The stars of the Pahriolive Beauty Box 
have formed a little lunch club, each tak- 
ing turn standing treat. It's Jimmy's 
party every Tuesday. And he has to sit 
back and suck a lemon while they dive 
into rich, creamy pies and cakes. But he's 
back-slid only once. 

"Though the best way to get thin," he 
told me, "is not only to diet. You've got 
to have systematic exercise to help the 
good work along. If you can take time 
out for swimming and hiking and gym, 
that's swell. A half hour of swimming 
consumes 250 calories; an hour's brisk 
walk of four miles, 350 calories, and a half 
hour of tennis burns up 300 calories. But 
since I can't find time for these regularly, 
I do the next best thing and go to gym. 

"How 1 loathe gym," he said frankly. 
"This afternoon I stood on the corner of 
Madison Avenue for fifteen minutes 
thinking up reasons for playing hookey. 
But f knew Marj would see through them 



— so I went. I go at least three times a 
week." 

Not everyone can go to gym, so I 
thought I'd better ask Jimmy what exer- 
cise he does there. "I take the whole 
works," he grinned, "stationary bicycling 
to reduce my thighs and hips; punching 
the bag, a swell sport for making muscles 
in your chest and arms; medicine ball, 
sparring, mat exercises. About the best 
thing for reducing that bay-window is to 
lie on the floor and imitate a bicycle 
pumping away with your legs. Don't stop 
till you're good and stiff, and watch your 
tummy deflate. 

"Here's another you can do at home, if 
someone will help. Lie on your back and 
throw a medicine ball every which way. 
This is a devil of a job at first— it makes 
all those lazy muscles of your stomach get 
into action. And do you feel it the first 
few days!" 

Within six months, Jimmy was down to 
184 pounds. And he passed the Warner 
Brothers test with flying colors. In fact, 
today he's in Hollywood making his first 
picture. 

So take a tip from him. Try his reduc- 
ing method. And maybe the girl friend 
or your wife won't watch Clark Gable 
with such a rapt expression. You may 
again become a hero in her eyes. 



WEDNESDAY- 
TOTAL CALORIES— 1550 
Breakfast Calories 

Grapefruit juice 100 

2 Strips bacon (small) 50 

Toast 100 

Coffee 50 





300 


Lunch 


Calories 


Vegetable soup (1 cup) 


100 


Toasted Cheese sandwich 


250 


Iced Tea 


50 




400 


Dinner 


Calories 


Fruit cocktail 


100 


Meat loaf 


200 


Beets 


50 


Baked potato 


100 



Lettuce & tomato salad (mineral oil dr.) 50 
Baked apple with honey 200 

Glass milk 150 

850 



THURSDAY— TOTAL 


CALORIES— 1525 


Breakfast 


Calories 


Half cantaloupe 


75 


4 Graham crackers and 


200 


Skimmed milk 


50 




325 


Lunch 


Caloiies 


Bouillon 


25 


Omelette (2 eggs) 


200 


3 Crackers 


75 


Stewed rhubarb 


150 




450 


Dinner 


Calories 


Tomato juice cocktail 


50 


2 Lamb chops (broiled) 


200 


Cole slaw 


50 


Squash 


50 


Spinach 


50 


Baked potato 


100 


Lemon ice 


200 


Coffee 


50 



750 






RADIO MIRROR 



FRIDAY— TOTAL CALORIES— 1575 



Breakfast 
Half grapefruit 
2 Poached eggs 
Toast 
Coffee 



Calories 

100 

150 

100 

50 



400 

Lunch Calories 

Salad mixed vegetables: (watercress, 

tomato, green pepper, radishes) 75 

1 Slice wheat bread 100 

Large slice fresh pineapple 100 

Tea 50 



Dinner 

Fruit coclctai 

balls) 
Broiled halibut, 
Cucumber salad 
Cauliflower 
Baked potato 
2 Cookies 
Milk 



325 

Calories 
(melon and watermelon 

100 
emon juice dressing 



200 
50 
50 
100 
200 
150 

850 



SATURDAY— TOTAL CALORIES 


—1555 


Breakfast 




Calories 


Sliced orange 




100 


Scrambled egg 




100 


Toast 




100 


Coffee 




50 
350 


Lunch 




Calories 


Spinach souffle 




150 


Sliced tomatoes 




30 


3 Crackers 




75 


Jello 




100 


Buttermilk 




75 
430 


Dinner 




Calories 


Half cantaloupe 




75 


Broiled liver (small 


portion) 


200 


4 Slices bacon (smc 


ID 


100 


String beans 




50 


Small portion spagf- 


etti 


150 


Apple sauce 




150 


Tea 




50 
775 



SUNDAY- 

Breakfast 

Sliced banana 

Crushed bran and skimmed 



TOTAL CALORIES— 1525 

Calories 
100 
200 



ilk 



Lunch 

Stuffed tomato (vegetables) 

Slice wheat bread 

Cup custard 

Coffee 



Dinner 

Chicken broth 

Roast beef (med. portion) 

Broiled mushrooms 

Corn 

Asparagus salad 

Apple 

Tea 



300 
Calories 
100 
100 
150 
50 

400 

Calories 
100 
300 
100 
100 

75 
100 

50 



825 

N.B. — You will note that each of these 
menus approximates 1550 calories, which 
is what the average man needs while re- 
ducing. Since Jimmy is taller than average 
(6'2"), his doctor allows him an additional 
250 calories daily, which he takes in the 
form of milk, fruit juices, fresh or stewed 
fruit, making his total for the day about 
1800 calories. 





This little medicine-fighter has one of 
childhood's greatest worries licked. 
He has just been introduced to a laxa- 
tive that's a treat — Fletcher's Castoria! 



"It's swell, 
Joel" 



Even the taste of Fletcher's Castoria is 
made especially for children. A youngster 
takes it willingly . . . and it's important 
that he should. For the revulsion a child 
feels when forced to take a laxative he 
hates upsets his nerves and digestion. 

And — Fletcher's Castoria was made 
especially for a child's needs — no harsh, 
purging drugs in Fletcher's Castoria such 
as some "grown-up" laxatives contain. 

That's right — 
Fletcher's 
Hj^\ Castoria. 

Like the carefully chosen food you give 
your child, Fletcher's Castoria is ideally 
suited for a child's growing body. 

It will never cause griping pain. It 



does not form a habit. It is gentle, safe 
and thorough. 




"Tell your mom 
to get some I ' 



Adopt Fletcher's Castoria as your child's 
laxative — until he is 11 years old. Get a 
bottle today — the carton bears the sig- 
nature Chas. II. Fletcher. Buy the Family- 
Size bottle — it's more economical. 




CASTORIA 

The Children's 
Laxative 




from babyhood to 1 1 years 



61 



RADIO MI RROR 



banish such worries. She must plunge 
into the business at hand, see to it that 
the orphans were kept happy and healthy. 
She woke up the morning of the eighth 
day feeling that she was well along in get- 
ting things running smooth. 

Alter lunch, she stretched out on the 
deep, wide sofa in the living room and 
half fell asleep. She didn't hear Steve 
come tiptoeing in. It was only when he 
stood over her, his arms piled high with 
bundles, that she opened her eyes. 

"Steve, you look like Santa Claus." 

"These," Steve said proudly, "are rat- 
tles, guaranteed to fit any mood." 

"Steve, be serious," Penelope said, sit- 
ting up, "you mustn't throw your money 
around like — like a drunken sailor!" 

"It's your own fault. You won't let me 
bring you presents and I've got to have 
some emotional outlet. And that reminds 
me," he went on, "a Mrs. Foster who 
adopted one of our boys four years ago 
is in the library. The kid has found out 
he's not really their child and he's taking 
it pretty hard." 

PENELOPE jumped to her feet. "I'll 
see her right now," she said over her 
shoulder as she ran across the hall into 
the other room. Mrs. Foster was sitting 
down, her face in her hands. Between 
sobs of anguish, she told the story. Her 
young nephew had told Bobby, the orphan 
she had adopted, that he had come from 
the Home and had mocked him. 

"Now Bobby just sits and broods," she 
explained. "He won't play or talk." 

Penelope saw that there was only one 
thing to do. "Will you send Bobby and 
Stuart to see me?" 

Before an hour was up, the maid was 
announcing that the two boys were wait- 
ing in the living room. Penelope hurried 
in to talk to them. "Which is Bobby and 
which is Stuart?" she asked. 

"I'm Stuart," one of the boys said 
proudly, then in disdainful tones, "Bobby, 
that's him," pointing to his companion 
who was looking down at his feet. 

"Well," Penelope said, "I'm glad to 
know you. I understand you both were 
adopted from here." 

"Not me!" Stuart said, puffing up 
with pride. "But Bobby's adopted." 

"Hmmm," Penelope mused, "you look 
good enough to be an adopted, Stuart. 
I'd never have guessed you weren't." 

"Oh, do adopteds always look good?" 
Stuart asked, a little crestfallen. 

"Our babies do," Penelope assured him. 
"We're very particular here. That's why 
Bobby's father and mother came to us 
when they wanted a little boy. They 
looked at twenty-nine babies before they 
found just the right one!" 

Bobby looked incredulous. "Twenty- 
nine? Gosh!" He turned to Stuart. "I 
guess' that'll show you us adopteds are 
pretty smart. You heard what she said. I 
was picked. Your mom and dad had to 
take what they got." 

When the two boys walked out, a few 
minutes later, it was Bobby whose chest 
was out. Penelope sank back in a chair, 
exhausted. She was still sitting there 
when Steve came back. 

She waved a hand and smiled wanly at 
him as he sauntered into the room. "I 
got those two small kids straightened 
out," she told him. 

"Swell," Steve answered. "How about 
dinner tonight in celebration?" 

Penelope shook her head slowly. "I'd 
love to, but I'm so tired my legs ache. 
I have some reports to write up anyway." 

Steve's face fell. "I can see this job is 

62 



The Adventures of Penelope 

(.Continued from page 34) 

going to interfere with your social life. 
I'll have to think up more business to see 
you about during office hours." 

"Steve, don't be silly. You know I'll 
always have time for you, only tonight I 
just couldn't keep my eyes open. You un- 
derstand, don't you?" 

"Sure, that's one thing you can count 
on me for, always," Steve answered. 

By herself once more, Penelope wasn't 
so sure that Steve did understand. Now 
that she was divorcing John, he had every 
right to expect formal consideration as a 
suitor. And — and she just couldn't. 

Her one, big worry at the moment was 
Mickey, the cripple she'd made her jack 
of all trades and who lived in the hope 
that soon someone would adopt him. The 
first week it had seemed that somebody 
would appreciate his willingness to work, 
his happy disposition. Now that nearly 
a month had gone by without anyone 
taking an interest, he was disappointed 
and discouraged. 

At last it was midnight and Penelope 
had to go to bed without having arrived 
at a solution. In the morning, before 
she could even finish breakfast, she had 
another caller. The maid announced, 
"Mrs. Crowder is in the library." 

Penelope finished her coffee, put aside 
the paper, and went out to greet her. 

"Penelope, which is the best baby 
you've got?" 

"Well," Penelope hesitated, "there really 
isn't any best baby. But why?" 

"I want to adopt one. Oh, not for my- 
self. I have two for each of my three 
husbands. This is for my daughter, Char- 
lotte. I'm sorry to say things haven't 
been going well for her lately. She's mar- 
ried, you know, and — well, she doesn't 
seem to settle down. I thought if she had 
a child she might . . . the doctor says she 
can't have one of her own." 

"But does she want a baby?" 

"Oh, I always did have to make up her 
mind for her." 

"All right." Penelope shrugged, "I'll 
have Mickey show you into the nursery." 

SHE watched Mrs. Crowder plunge up 
the winding staircase with grave mis- 
giving. She hated the idea of giving a baby 
to her, but she had no real reason for re- 
fusing. Miss MacDumfre'y joined her. 

"What'd that old battle axe want?" 
Then, without waiting for an answer, she 
added, "Steve Van Brunt's outside. He's 
got the monthly accounts." 

Penelope turned. Steve was walking 
down the hall, a big ledger under his arm. 
The smile he summoned up was only a 
shadow of his usual grin. "I hate to tell 
you this," he greeted mournfully. 

"I know, we're in debt. Is it bad?" 

"Bad! We're in the red two thousand 
three hundred and fifty-seven dollars." 

Penelope gasped with relief. "That 
isn't so terrible. We can make that up." 

"But the plumbers want to be paid." 

"All right. I'll send them my personal 
check this morning. How much is it?" 

"Over two thousand," Steve said, "and 
you can't even pay that Penelope, you 
haven't that much in the bank!" 

"Steve! You're crazy. What are you 
talking about?" 

The walls and ceiling and stairs swam 
crazily in front of Penelope. "Did he — 
did John — ■" She couldn't finish. 

"Nothing dishonest," Steve hurried to 
explain, "but he invested your money in 
flamboyant stocks." 

"Don't be so bitter about John," Pene- 
lope pleaded. "He's your best friend." 

"You mean he was. Good God, Pene- 



lope, I can't like him, remembering what 
he's done to you, how he took you away 
from me!" 

Fear, craven fear, crept up inside her. 
This was the scene she had tried to avoid. 
And then Miss MacDumfrey came back 
into the hall. 

"Mr. and Mrs. Henry Franz are here 
to look at babies. The poor people the 
doctor said had just lost their daughter." 

"Coming right away," Penelope said. 
Before Steve could stop her she had 
slipped past him to meet the young 
couple, the wife red eyed from weeping, 
the husband vainly trying to console her. 

"We thought maybe — well, maybe we 
might find a baby to take the place of 
our Susie," the husband explained. "The 
doctor says we can't expect to have an- 
other one of our own." 

LET'S go right up to the nursery," she 
suggested, leading them to the stairs, 
up to the ball-room. She stood to one 
side, waiting, while the mother walked 
down between the two rows of cribs, stop- 
ping and looking, walking ahead, looking 
again. Suddenly she was calling, laughing, 
sobbing. 

"Henry, Henry! Come here, quick! 
Look at her, the one in this crib!" 

Penelope and the husband hurried over. 
The mother leaned down and picked the 
baby up. "Just like our Susie," she cried. 
"Isn't she, Henry?" She turned to Pene- 
lope. "Can't we have this baby, please?" 

Brushing away a tear, Penelope nodded, 
"Certainly, and though we don't usually 
allow it, you can take her home right 
now with you." 

"We'll never forget your kindness," the 
mother promised, taking Penelope's hand. 
"Henry and I can be happy again." 

Penelope fought back her tears and led 
them to the door. In the hall, they ran 
into Mrs. Crowder hurrying towards the 
nursery. She stopped and stared, horri- 
fied, then pulled Penelope aside. 

"What was that woman doing with that 
child? That child she was carrying?" 

"That's Mrs. Franz," Penelope ex- 
plained. "She just lost her own daugh- 
ter and now she's found one just like her 
to take her place." 

"But she can't! Not that one. I've 
picked that one especially for my daugh- 
ter. I must remind you, Penelope, that 
I'm a trustee and I expect first choice." 

Penelope felt the color rush up into her 
cheeks. Remembering the joy with which 
Mrs. Franz had held the baby, she said 
grimly, "Listen to me, I'm the head of 
St. Vincent's. Anyone who takes that 
child away from Mrs. Franz does it over 
my dead body!" 

Bridling, Mrs. Crowder snapped, "I 
suppose there's nothing more to say, ex- 
cept — " and she paused dramatically, "I 
won't be able to open my house for the 
tea and fair this year. Nor can I con- 
tribute my annual donation. Good day." 

With a last defiant toss of her fat 
chins, Mrs. Crowder flounced from the 
room. Penelope was too chagrined to 
cry. Miss MacDumfrey found her lean- 
ing against the door, laughing. 

"I've just burned my bridges and crossed 
my Rubicon," Penelope said, "I've told 
Mrs. Crowder she could go to blazes!" 

Yet it was worthwhile. Penelope knew 
that in this tangled problem of running 
St. Vincent's, she had found the answer 
to her own personal troubles. Helping 
others to find joy and real living she 
could set the past, with its heartbreak, to 
one side and look ahead to a future that 
held promise of a new life. 



RADIO MIRROR 



Meet Michael Bartlett 

(Continued jrom page 19) 

nimbleness of eyebrow that would do 
credit to any Roman singer. 

In the beginning, Broadway failed to 
recognize in Michael the potentialities 
that have turned him overnight from a 
concert hall performer to a radio and 
screen star. Jerome Kern finally chose 
him to take one of the leads in his mu- 
sical comedy, The Cat and the Fiddle," 
but not until he had hired another for 
the part. Michael got the job after wait- 
ing eight months. 

"The trouble was," he said, "my back- 
ground scared them. They didn't think 
that anyone who could sing in four lan- 
guages and who had studied abroad could 
sing their popular melodies." 

THIS fear in producers has plagued him 
ever since, until last spring. Michael 
wanted to get into the movies. About the 
time sound films were springing up like 
mushrooms after a heavy rain, he went 
to Hollywood and took a series of screen 
tests. Fox finally handed him a year's 
contract as a featured player. And then 
never cast him in a single picture, just 
paid him his salary. 

lie's tried radio too, before this fall. "I 
can't count all the times I've been called 
down to some studio and told to sing for 
a prospective sponsor. Naturally I al- 
ways chose a piece I knew, light opera or 
a favorite ana, and the sponsor would 
just sit and shake his head. I hadn't sung 
'Love in Bloom' so I couldn't be much 
good!" 

The nearest he came was six months 
ago when he made an appearance over 
YVOR, powerful local station in New Jer- 
sey. Stubbornly sticking to his guns, 
he chose for one of his numbers a melody 
he had heard in Paris. He sang it in 
French, by way of introducing it to 
American audiences. 

No great rush of agents wanting to sign 
him soured Michael on radio and he went 
again to Hollywood, this time by re- 
quest. Grace Moore wanted him for her 
picture. He determined to forget broad- 
casting. 

Then this summer he had a phone call 
from an old school chum. "Come over 
and audition for the Jack Benny show," 
the friend said. Bartlett, in his own 
words, thought the friend was nuts, but 
he got an hour off from the lot where 
he was working and went to the radio 
studio, "Listen," the friend said, "I know 
you can sing, but you've got to do one 
popular number." 

Bartlett nodded and rushed out to a 
music store, grabbed the first sheet music 
he saw and took it back with him. When 
he opened it up, he saw it was "Tell Me 
That You Love Me Tonight." When he 
hummed the tune he discovered it was 
the same little French melody he had in- 
troduced last spring! 

Which all goes to prove that the right 
kind of stubbornness sometimes gets you 
places. It also explains why Michael 
Bartlett says he is glad of the chance to 
play comedy with Jack Benny, when an- 
other opera singer would snort and rear 
on his hind legs. He'll sing popular melo- 
dies from now on and like 'em. 



For MOVIE MIRROR'S radio pro- 
gram every Tuesday night from 
7:30 lo 8:00 P. M. EST, tune in 
on WMCA, WIP, WDEL, WCBM, 
WOL, WMEX, WPRO, or WLNH. 
You'll enjoy it! 







Miss Rosalie de Forest Crosby, a beautiful brunette 

'The right powder makes it 
brilliant/' Color Analyst said 

Here's a girl who thought all brunette 
powder shades were alike. Dark-haired 
with pale creamy skin, she had been 
using "just any" brunette powder. Her 
skin looked sallow with it — yellowish. 
Pond's Color Analyst told her why: "Too 
dull a shade." He smoothed on Pond's Bru- 
nette. "Why, this brightens my skin!" 
Her coloring looked positively alive 1 

Don't THINK Pond's Brunette is 
like any other brunette shade. Nor 
Pond's Rose Cream like any other blonde 
powder! They're not. Pond's Powder 
shades are the result of a new discovery 
that adds life to every skin. 

With an optical machine, Pond's color- 
analyzed the skins of over 200 girls. They 
discovered the secret tints that made each 
skin what it was. Most astonishing of all, 
they found that dazzling blonde skin 
owes its transparency to a hidden blue 
tint ! Glowing brunette skin gets its creamy 
clarity from a hidden touch of green! 



Over 200 girls' skin color-analyzed to find 
the hidden tints in lovely skin now blended 
invisibly in Pond's new Face Powder. 



Pond's blended all these precious tints 
into their face powder. Invisibly. When 
you fluff on Pond's, dull skin lights up. 
Pale skin surges with new vitality. A 
florid complexion tones down soft. Every 
skin blooms afresh! 

Don't use a powder shade that stamps 
you old-fashioned, dull. See what the 
new Pond's shades can do for you — 

Brunette — clears brunette skins 
Rose Brunette — warms dull skins 
Rose Cream — gives radiance to fair skins 
Natural — lighter — a delicate flesh tint 
Light Cream — a light ivory tone 

With Pond's, you don't have to be "pow- 
dering all the time" — it clings for hours. 
So delicate, it cannot clog. 



yUwRedfed 

55f size now 35C 
$1.10 size now 70<t 



5 Different Shades FREE! — Mail Coupon Today 

( This offer expires February I, IQ36) 

POND'S, Dpt.Ml32, Clinton, Conn. Please send me free 5 different shades 
of Pond's new Powder, enough of each shade for a thorough 5-day test. 

Name , 

Street . 

City State 



Copyright, 1935, Pond's Extract Company 



63 



RADIO MI RROR 



huAJt ttxrt 



nAAAWs 




CtH EUAMY 

pril 
ov/ers 
Talc 

AT'S thrilling to use only the softest, fin- 
est, imported talc . . . It's exciting to enjoy 
the refreshing fragrance of April Showers, 
"the perfume of Youth". . . And it's satis- 
fying to get this luxury at so low a price. 



A RADIO STAR 

Weighing Hundreds of Tons! 

By JACK HARRIS 



ONE of radio's most unique per- 
sonalities weighs several hun- 
dred tons and has almost 
enough power to pull Kate Smith's 
moon over the mountain. 

In two years of broadcasting, this 
unique radio performer has never 
spoken into or even seen a micro- 
phone, and, what is more, is not likely 
to do either in the remaining years of 
its radio career. 

This most unique radio performer 
is the Pan-American, crack passenger 
train of the Louisville and Nashville 
Railroad, which has broadcast daily for 
the past two years over WSM, 50,000 
watter in Nashville, Tennessee. 

If any there be to doubt that the 
Pan-American is a genuine radio per- 
former, a reference to the WSM mail 
tabulations will be convincing. 

From Canada to Cuba have come 
thousands of letters to attest the ap- 
peal of a radio performance which 
started two years ago as a stunt and 
proved so popular that it has continued 
daily since that time. 

Twelve miles after leaving Nash- 
ville on its southbound run to 
New Orleans and the Gulf 
Coast, the Pan American 
passes within the very 
shadow of WSM's giant 
tower (the tallest in 



America, rising 878 feet in the air). 

Each afternoon a WSM engineer 
leaves the transmitter building, walks 
to a little shanty by the tracks that 
houses the WSM microphone and 
equipment, and then calls the dis- 
patcher to check on the Pan-American's 
schedule. 

Finally, when this engineer sees the 
Pan-American nosing around the bend 
about two miles down the tracks, he 
calls the WSM operator back at the 
studios. The operator in turn 
signals the announcer who 
"introduces" the Pan- 
American. 

The mike which has 
been set up near 
the railroad 



No wonder April Showers Talc is the most fa- 
mous and best lo fed talcum powder in the world! 




Here are three veterans who pilot 
the Pan-American past station WSM's 
giant tower each afternoon. From 
left \o right, Bill McMurray has 
spent 48 years with the railroad, 
Jack Hayes 52 years and Tom Burns 
retired after 55 years on the rails. 



64 



RADIO .MIRROR 






Irncks is then opened and the WSM au- 
dience hears the crack passenger train as 
i approaches in the distance — then comes 
lhe Pan-American's salute, the regulation 
<rade-crossing signal of two long blasts, 
ine short, and a final long blast. As the 
Brain rushes toward the microphone, the 
jound increases in volume until it seems 
ohat the engine is about to come right 
3h rough the loudspeaker into the living 
aoom. And as suddenly and dramatically 
is it has entered, the Pan-American with a 
(fast shrill salute, fades into the distance. 

This broadcast of a train on its daily 
.schedule is unique in radio presentations 
and has for this reason evoked consid- 
arable comment and speculation. 

But the wide interest is due not so 
much to the uniqueness of the broadcast 
as to the strong universal appeal of the 
railroad. In this broadcast over WSM 
Che romance of the rails has been more 
powerfully and more realistically drama- 
tized than through any other means. 

It has captured the fancy and imagina- 
tion of thousands. Numbers of people, 
even in Cuba, set their clocks by the 
Pan-American, 5:10 p. m., C.S.T. Others 
are regular "passengers" on the broad- 
casts. 

There is one new seventy-four-year-old 
passenger on the Pan-American broadcast 
who never before has been a railroad pas- 
senger. 

HIS name is Tom Burns, and for fifty- 
five years he served the Louisville and 
Nashville Railroad, most of these as en- 
gineer of the Pan-American. 

It was Tom Burns who pulled the Pan- 
American on its debut over the radio. It 
was Tom Burns who gained such delight 
fiom the fan letters his broadcast re- 
ceived. And it was Tom Burns who in- 
sisted that there be a daily dress-rehearsal 
©f the Pan-American before it pulled out 
©f the depot in Nashville. 

If the whistle doesn't sound just right, 
or if anything else seems slightly awry, 
the engineer of the Pan-American is sure 
to hear about it — from his family at 
home, from division headquarters, from 
WSM and from fans who follow closely 
every move of the crack passenger train. 

Thus it is that each day before pulling 
sait, engineers follow the precedent of 
Tom Burns and give the Pan-American a 
thorough test, or dress rehearsal. 

For two years the Pan-American engi- 
neers have known that they cater to a 
highly critical audience. 

Now Bill McMurry, Jack Hayes, and 
Ed Carter are fully aware that their au- 
dience is even more critical and demand- 
ing than ever before. For to the thou- 
sands has been added the one who first 
started the broadcast, their former senior- 
colleague, Tom Burns. 

After fifty-five years on the rails, Tom 
Burns has sought retirement. 

And although he won't be able to climb 
tip in the cabin, get his hands and neck 
black in grease and feel the stinging wind 
in his face. Tom Burns will still be with 
lhe train he's known for more than a 
ilecade. 

For the chief performer of the first 
Pan-American broadcast will now become 
its "first" fan. 

Tom Burns will be at home — at his 
ladio each afternoon at 5:10. Thus he will 
still be able to bring the Pan-American 
down the long stretch to the WSM micro- 
phone. 

And then, if the veteran of fifty-five 
years on the rails closes his eyes and 
dreams a bit, who can blame him if he 
continues, not with the music on the radio, 
but traveling down the rails with the 
Pan-American in its long, exciting run 
to New Orleans? 



Abi£ Smile- 



atta t 



a 







ONCE this lady fairly loathed the 
idea of taking a laxative. Post- 
poned it as long as she could. Hated 
the taste; hated the effect; hated the 
aftermath. Then she found out about 
Ex-Lax. 

It tastes just like smooth, velvety, 
delicious chocolate. Mild and gentle in 
action . . . approximating Nature. She 
found it thorough, too, without over- 
action. 

There was no need for her to keep 
on increasing the dose to get results. 
On every count she found Ex-Lax the 
ideal laxative. It is the best in America 
. . . according to America's opinion of 
it. Because more people take Ex-Lax 
than any other laxative. 46 million 



boxes were bought last year alone. 10c 

and 25c boxes; at every drug store. 

GUARD AGAINST COLDS! . . . Remember 
these common-sense rules for fighting colds 
— get enough sleep, eat sensibly, dress 
warmly, keep out of drafts, keep your feet 
dry, and keep reguLir— with Ex-Lax, the 
delicious chocolated laxative. 



MAIL THIS COUPON — TODAY! 

EX-LAX, Inc., P. O. Box 170 
Times-Plaza Station, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
P125 Please send free sample of Ex. Lax. 

Name 

Address 



U/ v<>" <"' r in Canada, write F.r-Lax. Ltd., 
73G Xnlrc Dame til. jr., Montrral) 



When Nature forgets — 
remember 

EX- LAX 

THE ORIGINAL CHOCOLATED LAXATIVE 



Tune in on "Strange as it Seems" , new Ex-Lax Radio Program. See local newspaper for station and time. 



65 




RADIO MIRROR 

Talent and Jitters 

(Continued from page 13) 



■ Do your hands feel coarse? Are they 
rough as stucco? Do they "snag" on silk? 

Why not use some rich, wide-spreading, 
quick-drying Italian Balm (just one drop is 
sufficient) and see how quickly your skin be- 
comes soft and smooth in texture ! 

Italian Balm is recognized as one of the 
quickest-acting, most economical skin beau- 
tifiers ever invented. These two qualities — 
effectiveness and economy — have made it the 
largest selling skin protector in America. 

In one of the nation's largest cities a recent 
Parent Teacher's Association Report, cover- 
ing over 5,000 homes, revealed that Italian 
Balm was practically a 3 to 1 favorite — used 
in about 3 times as many homes as any other 
similar preparation. 

Italian Balm is made from a secret formula, 
by a secret process. There is nothing like it 
on the world market today. Your drug and de- 
partment store carry Italian Balm in 3 sizes 
of long-lasting bottles— 35c, 60c and s&sjp 
S1.00 — and in handy 25 cent tubes, %^'ai* >, 



J%0* 



HANDY 
HOME DISPENSER 

Nickel plated, 100% guaranteed 
Italian Balm HOME DISPENSER 
— attaches easily to bathroom, 
kitchen or laundry wall (wood or 
tile). Dispenses one drop when you 
press the plunger. Try your drug- 
gist first— ask for the Dispenser 
Package. If he can't supply you — 
then gel one FREE by sending 
ONE 60c Italian Balm carton (and 
I Or to i over packing anil po-tage),or 
TWO 60c cartons and NO MONEY 
— with your name and address — to 
CAMPANA, Batavia, Illinois. 

Italian Balm 

THE ORIGINAL SKIN SOFTENER 
"America's Most Economical Skin Protector" 

06 




My little jape which turned them loose 
was a story 1 published about him and 
his wife. He has a wife, don't forget. He 
has never sued for a divorce, nor has Fay 
Webb, although she has sued for a lot of 
other things. 

That story brought me into Rudy's life 
when the situation, if you've forgotten, 
was something like this. The Vallee mar- 
riage had been headlined from ocean-to- 
ocean. There had been one serious split, 
then a widely-publicized reconciliation. 
Now. said Dame Rumor, there was an- 
other split. No one knew then that 
Rudy's brother, Bill, had taken record- 
ings of Fay Webb Vallee's telephone con- 
versations with Gary Leon; conversations 
that would sizzle in newspapers and in 
court weeks later. No one except Rudy's 
own intimates suspected that the Iron 
Man of Radio, as he is called by those 
who know the tremendous amount of 
work he accomplishes, had a heart as soft 
as Romeo's. Fay Webb knew it, of course, 
and she walked brazenly on it — with the 
spikes of her high heels bruising it with 
every step — never comprehending, 1 still 
believe, just what she was doing. 

AND what was she doing? Well, to go 
L back a bit, I first called at Rudy's 
office to discuss the story I had published 
about him. He didn't like it. He didn't 
like me. He didn't like anything. We 
tore up the place verbally before we 
called it quits. Next day, it was the same 
all over again, only this time he visited 
my office. 

As I look back I can measure the hurt 
in his heart by his fury. I saw something 
during those two days and heard some- 
thing during the hours we talked that 
I'm sure no one else ever saw or heard. 

Namely this. The boy was trapped. 
Trapped by the certain knowledge that 
his dirty linen would soon be hanging 
from every newspaper masthead in 
America. Bad publicity following a messy 
marriage had ruined other careers and 
his might go the same way. He was fight- 
ing blindly, I know now, to escape the 
trap into which he had fallen. But there 
was no escape. The public had to know 
the facts. I watched him while he 
struggled with the decision that put his 
whole future in jeopardy. 

He could have stopped his wife's suit. 
I'm certain of that. Her suit was for 
more money. 

But his was finally the uncompromising 
stand of a man who sees that truth is 
truth and right is right and both are to 
be followed regardless of consequences. 
By now, you know at least a part of 
those consequences. You know that his 
career has moved ahead in brave and 
buoyant style despite the mud through 
which he was forced to walk. But you 
don't know that he is almost the lone- 
liest man on Broadway. Or that he still 
carries in the heart she walked on the 
image of Fay Webb. 

How do 1 know? 

Only a short time ago, I was one of a 
group who were with him on his birth- 
day. Fourteen of us sat down to dinner 
that night. His father sat at the foot of 
the table. At the opposite end, in the 
place of honor, with Rudy on her right, 
sat a slender and self-contained young 
lady still in her teens. 

One of the guests who arrived late was 
introduced. As he turned to acknowledge 
the introduction, he started visibly, and 
then sat down. Rudy's father leaned for- 
ward, chuckling: 



"1 see you noticed it, too, eh?" 

The girl at the table's head looked so 
very much like another girl who had 
once sat there that she might have been 
Fay Webb's twin. 

Her name doesn't matter now, though 
it may some day. What does matter is 
that the woman Rudy placed in the posi- 
tion of honor that night was almost the 
physical counterpart of the woman he 
says he has forgotten. Curious, isn't it? 
Writing this, 1 wonder how that young 
girl felt that night, or if she realized she 
was sitting on another's throne. I won- 
der, too, how Fay Webb will feel when 
she reads this paragraph. 

Such striking resemblance is no coinci- 
dence, you may be sure, which lets me 
draw certain portentous but unhappy 
conclusions. What are they? Much the 
same as yours, most likely. 

The ordeal that unnerved the usually 
glacial Jessica Dragonette was peculiar. 
A lot of poppycock has been printed 
about Jessica. She has been made to ap- 
pear to be shy, forward, vain, haughty 
and arrogant in turn. Let it be under- 
stood, she is none of those things. 

Rather, she is the victim of her own 
planning. It is a story you don't en- 
counter often in radio because most of 
the biggest stars burst into our world in 
a blaze of pinwheel glory. Jessica's ca- 
reer has been different in that first she 
got a foothold and then proceeded to 
consolidate her position. 

From the very beginning, since she was 
left alone in a Jersey convent, she has 
dreamed of success. More important, she 
has prepared herself for success, studying 
all the right things and cultivating the 
correct habits of thought. As success 
came, she was ready for it and the public 
found in her not the little girl who once 
ran away from the ordeal of interviewing 
a theatrical manager but a thoughtful, 
capable performer whose stature has 
grown and whose hold on the affections 
of her fans has steadily increased. 

Which is precisely the reason she was 
unprepared for the crisis that came re- 
cently into her life. Everything else had 
been anticipated. Her personal tragedy is 
that nothing unexpected ever happens to 
her; her skill in anticipating develop- 
ments totally prevents the occurrence of 
the unusual. Whatever fun she has is or- 
derly, planned-for; never spontaneous. 
That is why I say she is a victim of her 
own creating. 

BUT this ordeal? Women will under- 
stand though men will scoff when I 
say it was the simple act of bobbing her 
hair. 

Jessica has a deep faith in the thou- 
sands of radio friends who write to her 
each month. She does her sincere best to 
live up to their exalted conception of her. 
In her mind, the thing that stood between 
her and bobbed hair was the reaction of 
those old friends. Would they approve? 

It was a decision any school girl could 
make between classes. Yet, it became the 
one thing that lay in the top drawer of 
her mind during much of last spring. 
What to do about Jessica's hair became 
the favorite topic of conversation after 
every Cities Service rehearsal. Director 
Bourdon discussed it, the quartet debated 
it, Ford Bond cogitated upon it. 

It was lovely hair, to be sure; rich with 
vivid golden coloring and fine as silk; 
and long enough to sit on. It sounds 
slightly silly now, I admit, but then it 
seemed eminently proper that Jessica 



RADIO MIRROR 



should suffer such mental distress. 

Late one afternoon, my phone rang. 1 
picked it up and heard her voice asking, 
"What do you think?" 

Yes, I discussed Jessica's hair, too. 
Frankly, I think i was flattered that she 
should seek my opinion. There was a 
motion picture part in the offing, she told 
me. Bobbed hair would make her look 
like a seventeen-year-old girl. With her 
voice and beauty, with the movies gob- 
bling up radio stars at the rate of two or 
three every week, she faced an exciting 
and entirely new sort of career. 

"Don't you dare cut it," I advised. 
"People think of Jessica Dragonette with 
long hair. Cut it and you'll spoil some- 
thing that they already like." 

She thanked me prettily. 

Next day, she cut her hair. 

I consoled myself with the thought that 
I had tried to save her for radio and for 
herself. 

By the way, I saw that new hair-cut 
just the other night. She wears it back, 
masking only the tops of her ears. And 
I'll swear, it does make her look like a 
million dollars. 



How Martha Means Is 
Facing Motherhood 

(Continued from page 26) 

Now that she is on the road to perma- 
nent radio stardom, she has refused to al- 
low her desire for a family to interfere. 
Her husband, Sid Brokaw, whom you 
know as the first violinist with Ozzie Nel- 
son, is in entire agreement with her view- 
point. 

"Sid and I feel that it's out of style to 
retire for months just because you ex- 
pect a baby and then for years after- 
wards, while it is growing up." 

It's not that Martha expects her own 
son to be without the companionship of 
his parents. Martha may sing on the air, 
but every moment of her spare time will 
be spent seeing to it that Edward Allen 
has all those things that were denied her. 

"I'll be able to take him out in the 
park mornings and I'll be home most of 
the evenings. The only difference between 
myself and another mother will be that 
instead of golf or bridge in the afternoons 
I'll work. I have a nurse for him now — 
I'm afraid as yet to take care of him my- 
self—and I intend to keep her later on. 
though I'll continue to spend as much 
time with the baby as any non-profes- 
sional mother does with hers." 

With such definite plans for her 
career, Martha might be expected to have 
just as decided views about her son's fu- 
ture, but she admits that "he'll have to 
work out for himself what he wants to 
do. A career is too important a matter 
to be decided by anyone else. He will al- 
ways be free to make his own decision, 
though, of course, we will give him all the 
advice and encouragement possible." 

Martha expects Edward Allen to bring 
Sid and herself even closer together, to 
make them still happier than they have 
been, and that's expecting quite a lot. 
There has been in the annals of radio no 
brighter love story than theirs. 

When Martha came to New York, to 
try her luck in radio, she found it pretty 
tough sledding. Wherever she went she 
was told that an unknown young singer 
was not wanted. Although she spent a 
whole month pleading with studio offi- 
cials, she couldn't get a single audition. 

"I'd sung in the Cocoanut Grove a few 
times for Ozzie Nelson," Martha said. 
"He seemed to like my voice, so I decided 



Genuine DIAMONDS fc. WATCHES 





C. O. D. to pay on arrival! We ship promptly 
all charges pre-paid. 

TEN DAYS FREE TRIAL 

You be the sole judge! If you can surpass these 
values anywhere simply send back your selec- 
tion and WE WILL PROMPTLY REFUND YOUR 
DEPOSIT. If fully satisfied after trial period pay 
only the small amount stated each month. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
Every ring or watch is sold with ROYAL'S written gold 
bond guarantee — backed by 40 years of fair and square 
dealing. Buy now to avoid the big Xmas rushl Order by 
mail the Royal way and SAVE! 







2 DIAMOND BAGUETTE Only S1.88 a month 

KL-8 . . . Elegantly styled, modern, genuine, Baguette 
wrist watch at an amazingly low price. The streamlined 
white lifetime case Is set with 2 brilliant, genuine diamonds 
and fitted with a fully guaranteed and dependable move- 
ment. Smart, link bracelet to match. S29.75 value specially 
offered at S19.75. Only $1.88 a month. 






Both for 

Only $2.88 a month 

KL-1 . . . "America's Dar- 
ling" — a most beautiful be- 
trothal ensemble in 14K Solid 
White or 14K Solid Yellow 
Goldl The luxuriously hand 
engraved engagement ring is 
set with a certified, specially 
selected dazzling, genuine 
blue-white diamond of maxi- 
mum value. Wedding ring is 
exquisitely hand engraved to 
match. State choice of white 
or yellow gold. Both com- 
plete for $29.75 — only $2.88 
a month. 

KL-1 A . . . Engagement ring 
only $21 .95 — $2.09 a month. 



24 s 

Just $2.35 a . month 

KL-5 . . . Elegant square 
prong engagement ring of 
14K Solid White or Yel- 
low Gold set with dazzling 
genuine blue-white center 
diamond and a matched 
diamond on each side. 
Beautifully milgrained. 
Only $2.35 a month. 




m 




Only $1.88 a month 

2 Genuine Diamonds 

KL-3 . . . Gentleman's hand- 
some initial ring. 10K Solid 
Yellow Gold set with 2 fiery 
genuine diamonds and 2 solid 
White Gold initials on genuine 
black onyx. Specify initials 
desired. Only $1.88 a mo. 



Featuring 
i undreds of 
money saving spe- 
cials in certified first qual- 
ity genuine diamonds, 
watches; jewelry and sil- 
verware on ROYAL'S 
liberal TEN PAYMENT 
PLAN. Send for copy 
today 

America's Largest Mjail Order Credit Jewelers 



10 Certified Genuine Diamonds 

KL-2 ..." Dawn of Happiness" — ex- 
quisitely matched engagement and 
wedding rins ensemble of beautifully 
engraved and milgrained 14K Solid 
White Gold. The specially selected. 
dazzling genuine blue-white center 
diamond in the engagement ring is 
made even more beautiful by the 2 
brilliant diamonds on each side; h 
expertly matched genuine diamonds In 

the Wedding ring. Both complete for 
only $42.50 — $4.15 a mo. 

IF PURCHASED SEPARATELY 
KL-2A . . . Engagement ring alone: 

$29.75 — $2.88 a mo. 

KL-2B . . . Wedding ring alone; 

$15.50 — $1.45 a mo. 



"Miss America" Baguette 
Only $2.37 a month 

KL-9 . . . BULOVA'S most popular 

Baguette at Bulova's lowest price. 
Daintily engraved: guaranteed BUL- 
OVA "radio time" movement. Lovely, 
matched bracelet. Only $2.37 a mo. 




IS Jewels Si 

The BULOVA SENATOR 



KL-7 . . . Bulova gent's WTist watch 
at Bulova's lowest prlcel Handsome, 
Bulova, quality white ca.se. 15 Jewel 
B-U-L-O-V-A movement, fully guar- 
anteed to give dependable service. 
Link bracelet. Only $2.38 a month. 



Dinmoiun 

WATCH toi 

Established 1895 
170 BROADWAY IM.Y.C 




Complete 

Only 51,88 a month 

KL-4... The famous WALTHAM — 
offered at a specially low price. Hand- 
somely engraved, 12 size white life- 
time case; factory' guaranteed, accu- 
rate and dependable 17 Jewel WAL- 
THAM movement; complete with 
engraved knife and chain to match. 
All for S19.75 — Only $1.88 a mo. 



67 



RADIO MI RROR 




It all depends 

on the 

WOMAN 



There are sensitive women everywhere who 
do not trust the superficial information that 
is going around about feminine hygiene. 
These deep-natured women want the whole 
truth from the scientific standpoint. They 
must depend on themselves to sift out the 
real facts. And to them the news about 
Zonile will be welcome. 

• You do not need to use poisonous anti- 
septics for feminine hygiene, just because 
an older generation used them. In those 
days there were no antiseptics powerful 
enough for the purpose, except the poisons. 
But that was before the discovery of Zonite 
— the antiseptic-germicide of the World War. 

Zonite is powerful, and Zonite is safe. 
Zonite is far more powerful than any dilution 
of carbolic acid that can be used on the 
human body. But Zonite is not poisonous. 
Not caustic. Zonite has never harmed any 
woman. It will not desensitize tissues. It 
cannot cause accidental poisoning. 

• The old-fashioned poisonous antiseptic 
has no place in the life of the modern woman. 
She has welcomed Zonite— and Zonite is now 
available in every town and city through- 
out the length and breadth of America. 
Sold in bottles; 3 sizes, 30c, 60c, $1.00. 

Another jorm of Zonite . . Suppositories 

Besides the liquid Zonite, there are also Zonite 
Suppositories. These are $1.00 for box of a 
dozen. They are dainty white cone-like forms, 
each sealed in its own glass vial. Some women 
prefer them to the liquid. Other women use 
both. Ask for both the Zonite Suppositories 
i-nd the Liquid Zonite by name at drug and 
department stores. There are no substitutes. 

• Send for the booklet "Facts for Women." 
This is a plain, clear statement on the whole 
subject of feminine hygiene. Much discussed in 
women's circles. Coupon below will bring you 
a copy. Read it and get frank, authoritative 
data on this important phase of modern life. 
Write today. 

yii_!°yf°_1_ F .?_ R _.EJ? EE BOOKLET 

ZONITE PRODUCTS CORPORATION RM-612 

Chryiiler Bulldinit. New York. N. Y. 

Please Bend mc free copy of the booklet or booktetH checked below. 
( ) Facta for Women ( ) U»e of Anti»cptics in the Home 

NAME 

Wleaae print namr) 
ADDRESS 

CITY STATE 

(In Canada: Saints Thcrese. P.O..) 

68 



I'd go see him. He was never in, as it 
happened, when 1 called. Sid was his 
violin director and after awhile he asked 
if there was anything he could do for me. 
When I told him how badly 1 needed a 
job, he arranged an audition for me at 
NBC. And right after that, I got a spot 
on the air on a sustaining program." 

The rest is pretty much history. Phil 
Baker came East and heard her sing. 
Two weeks after her debut on the net- 
work, he had signed her up for his 
Armour Show. When he went back to 
Chicago, he asked her to come with the 
program. But she refused. 

"I was falling in love with Sidney," she 
explained, "and I wouldn't have left New 
York for all the money in the world." 

Sid was also showing a decided inter- 
est. Under the pretense of helping her 
select songs, he came calling at least four 
mornings a week. Since he was playing 
every night at the Cocoanut Grove, he 
couldn't take her out to dances or shows. 
But Martha didn't care as long as she 
could sit at a table and watch the band. 



"He never really proposed to me at all," 
Martha laughed. "He didn't have to tell 
me he was in love with me. It wasn't 
necessary, we understood each other so 
well, we felt as if we'd always belonged 
to each other." 

They were married last summer, after 
Sid had started out on tour with the 
band. It took onl}' a few days away from 
Martha to make up his mind. He came 
home one Friday, ostensibly for a week- 
end, and they were married on Sunday. 
They're living now in a sunny apartment, 
just the place for babies, overlooking Cen- 
tral Park. 

"When we were married," Martha told 
me, "everyone insisted that I'd ruined my 
career. That Sid would object to the ir- 
regularity of the meals and the uncer- 
tainty of my hours in general. That I'd 
have to give up radio as a result. It 
didn't work out that way at all. 

"So now, when they say that my baby 
will write finis to my professional life, I 
think they're wrong again, and I'm going 
to prove it!" 



Secrets of a Society Hostess 

(Continued from page 45) 



have his dinner, which has been kept 
warm in the kitchen, brought on. 

The reason I evolved this method is 
that such a handling of the situation 
makes me feel better when I, myself, am 
late. And the Golden Rule is just as ef- 
fective in social matters as it is in every 
day living. 

In fact there is one general rule that 
can be made for every hostess. When 
you find yourself in a tight spot simply 
put yourself in the place of the guest and 
figure out what would make you feel 
most at ease tinder similar circumstances. 
Then follow that line of behavior. 
Though I've said before that rules are 
made but to be broken, this is an in- 
fallible law which no set of circumstances 
can change. 

Much more important than having the 
correct silverware and the finest china 
and perfectly blended flowers is the busi- 
ness of human relations. As I explained 
before I have always tried to have people 
who mixed well together. But it is im- 
possible for any hostess to keep up with 
all social feuds and the time is bound to 
come when she finds she has invited two 
guests who do not speak to each other. 
And here, for once, it is up to the guests 
to carry the situation. 

It is very stupid for people to stop 
speaking. There may be plenty of people 
whom you do not like, but it is childish 
to carry a feud so far that you cannot 
exchange a greeting with your most 
deadly enemy. And yet I must admit 
that there are about three people I know 
(and I think this is a fairly good aver- 
age out of the thousands in my acquain- 
tance) with whom I do not make conver- 
sation, but I bow to everyone in a mu- 
tual friend's house. 

Knowing so well in what a bad spot an 
unpleasant atmosphere puts a hostess, I 
try when I'm in another's home to avoid 
any suggestion of a scene. Suppose for 
instance, I happen to be seated next to 
someone who does not speak to me or to 
whom I do not speak. Without making 
it at all obvious I simply turn to the 
person on my other side and make con- 
versation. My enemy is at liberty to do 
likewise. And that is good etiquette for 
guests. 

But if a hostess knows that some feud 
is going on (and she should be clever 
enough to sense an atmosphere) then the 
best thing she can do is to pretend to ig- 



nore it. The officious peacemaker is not 
welcome. Those little pat phrases like, 
"Really you two should be friends" only 
infuriate enemies the more. These are 
individual problems which a person 
should be allowed to work out individu- 
ally. 

One of the grandest receptions I ever 
gave was that in honor of Noel Coward 
and Deems Taylor. Noel had a successful 
play running on Broadway and Deems' 
"Peter Ibbetson" was bringing him glory 
at the Metropolitan Opera. 

Robert Montgomery, Lawrence Tib- 
bett, Murray H. B. Paul. William 
Mathius Sullivan, Clifton Webb, Grace 
Moore, Fray and Braggiotti — everyone 
was there that evening. 

There were three pianos in the house — 
two in one room and one in another, and 
a couple of musicians, who weren't a 
piano team at all, found some two-piano 
music and began playing it. 

LAWRENCE TIBBETT, who is, as 
you know, a baritone, sang the tenor 
part of Tosca and sang it wonderfully. 
Then Noel Coward sat at the piano. It 
was as if he were inspired. He played and 
sang everything he knew. But that was 
too much for Beatrice Lillie. She had to 
do something, so she and Clifton Webb 
did the most screamingly funny burlesque 
of La Boheme I've ever heard. Can you 
imagine Bee as Mimi and Clifton as Ro- 
dolfo? 

With those three pianos going at once 
and the various types of singing it must 
have sounded outside as if I were trying 
to outdo bedlam instead of giving a re- 
ception for two eminent artists. 

I could go and on. I could describe 
hundreds of brilliant affairs that have 
taken place at my house but I'm afraid 
that they would bore you, for actually 
the purpose of this series is to give you 
some of the social tips that I've found 
successful during the years. Have I 
helped you? I hope so. For I consider 
being a good hostess a great art. And 
any art needs study, style, flavor and per- 
sonal talent. 

I'm taking for granted that you know 
the common usages of etiquette — such 
things as that the lady guest of honor 
should be at the host's right and the 
gentleman honored at the hostess's right; 
that husbands and wives should not be 
put next to each other at dinner; that 



RADIO MIRROR 



there should, however, be a man and a 
woman, a man and a woman; that the 
hostess should be served first; that when 
wine is served a very little should be 
poured from the bottle into the host's 
glass before the guests are served and 
then that his glass should be filled at the 
very last (this is done so that if a little 
of the cork has fallen into the wine the 
host— and not a guest — has it in his glass; 
that all signals for sitting down and leav- 
ing the table should be given by the host- 
ess that table flowers should always per- 
mit guests seeing over them; that the 
ladies should leave the table first and sit 
awhile in the drawing room, giving the 
men a chance to smoke and tell their 
stories. 

These things, and many, many more, 
are the well founded rules. A good host- 
ess must know them, but if it is neces- 
sary to break one of them she must have 
the wit to carry it olf as if it were care- 
fully studied out on her part. She must 
never, never let a guest see that she is ill 
at ease and if a dish is broken or some- 
thing spilled she must show no displeasure 
whatsoever. 

But while these things should be 
known, they are not the real secrets of 
being a good hostess. I have tried to let 
you in on these real secrets. It might be 
fun to summarize them: 

Be different! Have a style of your 
own! Know the rules and then have the 
courage to break them. 

Create a background for yourself. Just 
by using a little energy and will power 
and daring to be different from her 
friends any woman can be a good hos- 
tess. 

TREAT your parties casually. Plan the 
menu, invite the guests and forget 
about it until the time arrives. You'll 
have a lot more fun than if you fuss and 
worry for weeks. 

If two people you know are quarrel- 
ing and happen to be at your house si- 
multaneously (this could only happen if 
you didn't know about it beforehand) 
don't try to make peace between them. 
Pretend to ignore the fact that they do 
not chat. It is up to them to bridge the 
difficult situation. 

Have the things that your guest of 
honor likes most to eat. It always flat- 
ters him tremendously. 

If a guest is late wait fifteen minutes 
beyond the appointed time and then go 
in to dinner. When the guest arrives say, 
"I thought you'd be more comfortable if 
we sat down," and then have his dinner 
served to him. 

But the most important rule of all is — 
when you find yourself in a tight spot, 
simply put yourself in the place of the 
guest and figure out what would make 
you feel most at ease under similar cir- 
cumstances. Then follow that line of be- 
havior. 

I wish all of you could come to my 
home for a cosy pleasant evening. But 
since distance denies that, I'm glad you 
let me come to your homes, because 
that's what I feel you are doing when 
you read here my "secrets!" 

Thank you — it is most sweet and gra- 
cious of you to do so! 



Don't 


miss 


the 


grand 


fea- 


ture on 


"One 


Man's 


Family," 


the pro 


gram 


wh 


ch 


you 


m- 


sisted remain 


on 


the air 


— in 


the January issue, 


out Novem- 


ber 26. 














You May Think It is No.l When It Really 
is No. 3; Or No. 2 Rather than No. 4 



The Wrong Shade of Face Powder 

Will Make You Look Years Older 

Than You Really Are! 



BY 



^dcOAl (ZJZ&VL. 



Are you using the right shade of face powder 
for you? 

That sounds like a rather needless question, 
doesn't it? For there is nothing a woman selects 
more confidently than her color of face powder. 
Yet, it is an actual fact, as artists and make-up 
experts will tell you, that many women use alto- 
gether the wrong shade of face powder. 

The shade they so fondly believe makes them 
look their youngest and most attractive does 
just the opposite and makes them look years 
older than they really are! 

Brunettes think that because they are bru- 
nettes they should use a dark shade. Blondes 
think they should use a light shade. Titians 
think they should use something else. 

Choose by Trying 

The fact is, you shouldn't choose a face 
powder shade according to your "type" or 
coloring, but according to which one is 
the most becoming for you. After all, a 
brunette may have a very fair skin while 
a blonde may have a dark or olive skin 
or any shade between. The only way to 
tell, therefore, is to try all five shades 
which, experts agree, accommodate all 
colorings. 



So fundamentally sound is this principle that 
I want you to prove it to yourself at my expense. 
I will therefore send you all five shades of my 
Lady Esther Face Powder free of charge and ob- 
ligation . When you get the five shades, try all five 
on. Don't think that your choice must be con- 
fined to any one or two shades. As I say, try on 
all five. Maybe the very shade you think least 
suited to you is really your most becoming, your 
most flattering. 

Stays on for 4 Hours 

When you make the shade test of Lady Esther 
Face Powder, I want you to notice, too, how 
smooth this face powder is — how evenly it 
goes on and long it holds. By actual test, you 
will find this face powder adheres for four 
hours or more. 

Write today for all five shades of Lady Esther 
Face Powder which I offer free. With the five 
shades of Lady Esther Face Powder I will also 
send you a 7-day tube of Lady Esther Face 
Cream. The coupon brings both the powder 
and cream. 



FREE 



(You can paste this on a penny postcard.) (19) 
Lady Esther, 2034 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 

Please send me by return mail a liberal supply of all five 
shades of Lady Esther Face Powder; also a 7 -day supply of 
your Lady Esther Four-purpose Face Cream. 

Name - 



Address^ 
City 



(If you live in Canada, write Lady Esther, Ltd., Toronto, Ont.) 



69 



RADIO MI RROR 



6 WEEKS AGO 

JT SKINNY .-J f|CT 



TODAY 



Compare Her 

Measurements 

With Yours 

H'GHT. 5 FT. 4 In, 
W'GHT. 120 Lbs, 
BUST . 
WAIST 
HIPS . 
THIGH . 
CALF . 
ANKLE . 




NEW7-P0WER"YEAST 
ADDS5 TO I5LBS.#« 

Richest imported ale yeast now con- 
centrated 7 times with three special 
kinds of iron in pleasant tablets 

AN AMAZING new "7-power" yeast dis- 
. covery is putting pounds of solid, nor- 
mally attractive flesh on thousands of 
"skinny," run-down people who never could 
gain an ounce before. 

Doctors now know that the real reason 
why great numbers of people find it hard 
to gain weight is that they don't get 
enough Vitamin B and iron in their daily 
food. Now scientists have discovered that 
the richest known source of health-building 
Vitamin B is cultured ale yeast. By a new 
process the finest imported cultured ale 
yeast is now concentrated 7 times, making 
it 7 times more powerful. Then it is com- 
bined with 3 kinds of iron in pleasant 
little tablets called Ironized Yeast tablets. 

If you, too, are one of the many who 
need these vital health-building elements, 
get these new "7-power" Ironized Yeast 
tablets from your druggist at once. Day 
after day, as you take them, watch flat 
chest develop and skinny limbs round out 
to normal attractiveness. Indigestion and 
constipation from the same source quickly 
vanish, skin clears to normal beauty — 
you're an entirely new person. 

Results guaranteed 

No matter how skinny and run-down you 
may be, try this wonderful new "7-power" 
Ironized Yeast for just a few short weeks. 
If you're not delighted with the results of 
the very first package, your money will be 
instantly refunded. 

Only don't be deceived by the many cheaply pre- 
pared "Yeast and Iron" tablets sold in imitation of 
Ironized Yeast. These cheap counterfeits usually con- 
tain only the lowest grade of ordinary yeast and iron, 
and cannot possibly Rive the same results as the 
• entitle Ironized Yeast formula. Be sure you get 
the genuine. Look for "IY" stamped on each tablet. 



Special FREE offer! 

you building up your health right away, we 
at olutely FIIEE offer. Purchase a package 
of Ironized Yeast tablets at once, cut out the seal on 
and mail it to us with a clipping of this 
paragraph. We will send you a fascinating new book 
on health. "New Fact'. About Your Body." Remem- 
ber, re ults guaranteed with the very first package — 
or monev refunded. At all druggists. Ironized Y'east 
toe., Dept. 2212, Atlanta, Ga. 



70 



Facing the Music 

(Continued from page 29) 



whole thing. Jack Mills, head of Mills 
Music, Inc., large publishing house, says 
that firms all over the country are so 
swamped with songs from unknown com- 
posers that it is impossible to give them 
proper attention. However, you may gar- 
ner some comfort from this startling 
statement by Sigmund Romberg. 

"It is harder to write popular music 
than classical music." 

Essentially, he means, in the simpler 
melodies of the popular song, the com- 
poser has a more limited range in which 
to work, and is thus faced with a more 
difficult task in making his composition 
distinctive. 

* * * 

l^JOW, if there are any of you who 
■L^I have studied and studied until you 
feel you can compose original chamber 
music, take heed of the competition being 
conducted by the NBC Music Guild. The 
awards are: First Award, $1,000; Second 
Award, $500; and Third, $250. To enter, 
it is absolutely necessary for you to write 
for the entry blank and complete details. 
Address the NBC Music Guild, 30 Rocke- 
feller Plaza, N. Y. *C. Manuscripts must 
be received by February 29, 1936. 

^ ^ * 

SHORT, SWEET AND LOWDOWN 

Catherine Jones, Philadelphia, Pa. — 

Last reports as we go to press indicate 
Buddy Rogers' Orchestra is playing at 
the Santa Catalina Island Casino, Santa 
Catalina, Cal. You might address him 
there. Mabel E. Gordon, Newark, N. J. — 
Are you sure you mean Marion Davies? 
We are certain she has not married any 
orchestra leader. Blanche Schrader, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. — Pat Kennedy is reported 
as just now organizing his orchestra under 
NBC management, so that by this time, 
you might well be hearing him on some 
National network. M. E. Jollow, Bran- 
don, Manitoba. — As far as we know, most 
of Ben Bernie's fall broadcasts will orig- 
inate in Chicago. Miss Catherine Avery, 
Shaker Heights, Ohio — In future issues 
we hope to include as many pictures as 
possible of the vocalists you mention. 
Edwin Nelson, Salt Lake City, Utah — We 
hope our Following the Leaders section 
will help you locate some of the bands. 
It is utterly impossible to find out in ad- 
vance where some of them will be. They 
don't know themselves. Lombardo Fan, 
Canton, Ohio — At present, Guy Lom- 
bardo and his Royal Canadians are on 
a sustaining series as well as being spon- 
sored. This series is originating in the 
Place de l'Opera night club in Manhattan 
and is on over a CBS network Saturday 
nights at 10:30 EST and Thursday nights 
at 1 1 :00 EST. These are subject to 
change. Mae Clark, Albany, N. Y. — To 
what Miss Tucker do you refer? If you 
will send me her full name, I may be able 
to help you. Rose France, New Haven, 
Conn. — Address Bob Crosby care of 
Rockwell-O'Keefe, 1270 Sixth Avenue, N. Y. 

^ % H« 

FOLLOWING THE LEADERS 

Some of you feel as though you just 
must see your favorite orchestras in ac- 
tion as well as listen to them. Pick out 
those bands and see if you are situated 
near enough to go to dance to their music. 
This list, covering the month of Novem- 
ber, is subject to change. 
Bernie, Ben. Chez Paree, Chicago. 
Boulanger, Charley. Oriental Gardens, 

Chicago. 
Coleman, Emil. St. Regis Hotel, N. Y. C. 
Cugat, Xavier. Waldorf Astoria Hotel, 

N. Y. C. 



Cummins, Bernie. Roosevelt Hotel, N. 

Y. C. 
Duchin, Eddie. Plaza Hotel, N. Y. C. 
Fio Rito, Ted. New Yorker Hotel, N. 

Y. C. 
Grant, Bob. Savoy-Plaza Hotel, N. Y. C. 
Johnson, Johnny. Commodore Hotel, N. 

Y. C. 
Jones, Isham. Lincoln Hotel, N. Y. C. 
Keller, Leonard. Bismark Hotel, Chicago. 
Kemp, Hal. Pennsylvania Hotel, N. Y. C. 
Little, Little Jack. St. Moritz Hotel, 

N. Y. C. 
Lombardo, Guy. Cafe de l'Opera, N. 

Y. C. 
Lopez, Vincent. Ambassador Hotel, N. 

Y. C. 
Lyman, Abe. Hollywood Restaurant, N. 

Y. C. 
Madriguera, Enric. Morrison Hotel, Chi- 
cago. 
Nelson, Ozzie. Lexington Hotel, N. Y. C. 
Noble, Ray. Rainbow Room, Rockefeller 

Center, N. Y. C. 
Pancho. Pierre Hotel, N. Y. C. 
Reisman, Leo. Central Park Casino, N. 

Y. C. 
Rines, Joe. Mayfare, Boston, Mass. 
Romanelli, Luigi. King Edward Hotel, 

Toronto. 
Scotti, William. Essex House, Newark, N.J. 
Stern, Harold. Fifth Avenue Hotel, 

N. Y. C. 
Whiteman, Paul. Ritz-Carlton Hotel, N. 

Y. C. 

* * * 

YOU'RE TELLING US 

You know we want you to use this 
coupon, but in order to be fair to every- 
one, questions should be confined to music 
and artists on the networks. And don't 
worry, if your question falls in that cate- 
gory and it's possible to answer it, we'll 
answer it. If it takes a bit of time, don't 
take your sword in hand, just use the 
mightier pen and the coupon below and 
ask us something else you want to know. 

BULLETIN! 

Word has been flashed to us just before 
going to press that Paul Whiteman is 
going on the air beginning January fifth 
for Bing Crosby's old sponsor at a salary 
reported as $10,000 a broadcast. This 
confirms the report made earlier in this 
column that Paul would demand more 
money for any subsequent sponsored pro- 
gram using guest stars. With Bing going 
on for Paul's former sponsor, the two 
stars have, in effect, merely swapped 
horses in midstream. 



John Skinner, 
RADIO MIRROR, 
1926 Broadway, 
New York City. 

I want to know more about: 
Orchestral Anatomy 

Theme Song Section 

Following the Leaders 

Or 

Name 

Address 



RADIO MIRROR 



Cooking for the Sisters of 
the Skillet 



(Continued from page 51) 

Sound last summer, and he insists that 
the flavor is delicious. However, since sea 
water is not always available, Ed and 
Ralph recommended some other potato 
recipes for you. As a matter of fact, the 
Sisters are almost lyric on the subject of 
potatoes. "You can see for yourself that 
we like them," Ralph explained, and Ed 
added, "We total five hundred pounds." 

Ralph suggests cooking potatoes with 
dill, which he feels is just as much at 
home with a potato as with a pickle. Add 
a stalk of dill — fresh, preferably, although 
dried dill may be used — to the water in 
which potatoes are boiled — an especially 
good method for cooking potatoes for 
salad. Another way to introduce the dill 
flavor is to add finely minced dill to white 
sauce when serving creamed potatoes. 

Ed feels that mashed potatoes are 
taken too much for granted and suggests 
a few variations. When adding the sea- 
sonings, include, for every cup of mashed 
potato, a tablespoonful of minced par- 
sley, chives or onion. Grated cheese, 
melted in warm milk or cream, also adds 
a unique flavor. The Sisters have other 
potato recipes, too — a delicious potato 
loaf and a new and appetizing sour kraut, 
frankfurter and potato dish which I'll be 
glad to send to you. 

Since winter is the time for stews, Ed 
and Ralph gave me this recipe for chicken 
stew, made with ham. 

"Sisters'" Chicken Stew 
1 stewing chicken, disjointed 
I qt. canned tomatoes with juice 
1 cup minced ham 
3 minced onions 

Vi cup minced green pepper 

Va tsp. salt. 

% tsp. paprika 

Half dozen pepper corns 

Place chicken in heavy stew kettle, 
cover with tomatoes and juice, add ham, 
onion, green pepper and pepper corns and 
cook, covered, until tender (about two 
hours) adding paprika and salt when 
partly cooked. Thicken to taste and 
serve on large platter surrounded by a 
ring of rice, egg noodles or spaghetti. Or 
serve with biscuits — and if you've never 
before added a tablespoon of minced pi- 
miento to your biscuit dough try it now. 

The oyster stew, with double portion 
of oysters for Ed and none at all for 
Ralph, is just the thing for winter eve- 
nings and if you would like to try it just 
ask me for it. 

If you are a sandwich addict, especially 
if you have a sandwich toaster, you'il 
want to try this favorite of Ralph's. But- 
ter two slices of rye bread then, keeping 
the buttered sides outside, make a regula- 
tion sandwich of Swiss cheese spread with 
mustard— Ralph prefers domestic cheese 
and Belgian mustard — and toast on both 
sides until the cheese is melted and the 
bread browned. 

It isn't only in the field of so-called 
masculine cookery that Ed and Ralph ex- 
cel. When we touched on the subject of 
holiday dishes. Ed suggested a new plum 
pudding and Ralph bobbed up with a 
variant of cranberry sauce that you will 
like. I'll send these recipes with those for 
oyster stew and potatoes if you will ask 
me for them. And don't forget that I'll 
also get for you your favorite radio stars' 
favorite recipes if you will let me know 
the ones you are interested in. Address 
Mrs. Margaret Simpson, Radio Mirror, 
1926 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 



STOP your Rupture 

Worries/ 




Learn About My Perfected 
Unique Rupture Invention! 

Why worry and suffer with that 
rupture any longer? Learn now 
about my perfected rupture inven- 
tion. It has brought ease, comfort, 
and happiness to thousands by as- 
sisting Nature in relieving and 
aiding many cases of reducible 
hernia! You can imagine how 
happy these thousands of rupture 
sufferers were when they wrote me 
to report relief, comfort and re- 
sults! How would YOU like to 
be able to feel that same happiness 
to sit down and write me such a 
message — a few months from to- 
day? Hurry — send coupon quick 
for Free Rupture Book, PROOF 
of results and invention revelation! 

Marvelous-Acting Device 

Binds and Draws the Broken 

Parts Together as You Would 

a Broken Limb! 

Surprisingly — continually — my per- 
fected Automatic Air Cushions draw 
the broken parts together, allowing Na- 
ture the Great Healer, to swing into 
action! All the while you should ex- 
perience the most heavenly comfort and 
security. Look! No obnoxious springs 
or pads or metal girdles! No salves or 
plasters! My complete Appliance is 
feather-lite, durable, invisible, sanitary 
and CHEAP IN PRICE! Wouldn't 
YOU like to say "goodbye" to rupture 
worries and "hello" to NEW freedom 
. . . NEW glory in living . . . NEW 
happiness — with the help of Mother 
Nature and my marvelous-acting Air 
Cushion Appliance? 



BROOKS RUPTURE APPLIANCE 
SENT ON TRIAL! 



My invention is 
never sold in stores 
nor by agents. Be- 
ware of imitations! 
You can get it only 
from my U. S. fac- 
tories or from my 
3 3 foreign offices! 
And I'll send it to 
you on trial. If you 
don't like it — if 
it doesn't "work" 

BROOKS AP 

182F State St. 



— it costs you 
NOTHING. But 
don't buy now. Get 
the facts about it 
FIRST! Write me 
today. I'll answer 
in plain, sealed en- 
velope with amaz- 
ing information 
Free. Stop Your 
Rupture Worries — 
send coupon now! 

PLIANCE CO. 



CONFIDENTIAL COUPON 



for RUPTURE 

H. C. BROOKS, 
182F State Street, 
Marshall, Mich. 

Rush me your new 
Free Book, amazing 
rupture method rev- 
elation, proof of re- 
sults, all without 
obligation, and in 



SUFFERERS 




plain, sealed envelope. c - E - BROOKS i 
Inventor ' 



A'ame . 
Street. 
City. 



State ._. 

Stale whether lor Man Q, Woman _, or Child □ 

Marshall, Mich. Lj m — — m m — ^ -m- . ■ 



71 



RADIO MIRROR 



Millions 
Suffer 

v e w lei I- 




AN AFFLICTION ALL 

THE MORE DANGEROUS 

FOR ITS DELICACY 

THERE is nothing more painful than Piles- 
more enervating ! Piles can make you a veri- 
table wreck, physically and mentally. More- 
over, they can turn into something very serious. 

If there's one thing that should be treated 
promptly and earnestly, it is Piles! Yet, on 
account of the delicacy of the trouble, many 
hesitate to seek relief. 

A real treatment for the distress due to Piles 
is supplied today in Pazo Ointment. Pazo 
almost instantly stops the pain and itching — 
and makes for complete comfort. Pazo is 
effective because it is threefold in effect. 

THREEFOLD EFFECT 

It is (1) soothing, which tends to relieve the 
pain and itching. It is (2) lubricating, which 
tends to soften hard parts and make passage 
easy. It is (3) astringent, which tends to reduce 
swollen parts and stop bleeding. 

Pazo is put up in Collapsible Tubes with a 
special Detachable Pile Pipe, which is perfor- 
ated. The perforated Pile Pipe, when attached 
to the Collapsible Tube, makes it easy for you 
to apply the Ointment high up in the rectum 
whete it can reach and tnoioughly cover the 
affected parts. Thousands of persons have used 
this method with complete satisfaction. 

However, for those who prefer supposi- 
tories, Pazo is now put up in that form, too. 
Pazo Suppositories are Pazo Ointment, simply 
in suppository form, and self-lubricating. Pazo 
Suppositories are packed 14 to the box and 
are not only more effective but more econom- 
ical than the ordinary. 

PROVE IT! 

Try Pazo today and see how unnecessary it is 
to suffer the torment of Piles. All drug stores 
sell Pazo-in-Tubes and Pazo Suppositories at 
small cost. Either will surprise you with results. 



72 



What's New on Radio Row 

(Continued from page 46) 



It's a girl in the home of Em, of Clara, 
Lu 'n' Em. She was christened Jane 
Pendleton Mitchell, Mrs. John M. Mit- 
chell being Em's name in real life. This 
makes two children in the domociles of 
the trio, Lu (Mrs. Howard Berolzheimer) 
having adopted a boy baby several 
months ago. Now the fans are wonder- 
ing what Clara is going to do since her 
buddies have shown the way. . . . Bar- 
bara (Bennett) Downey is awaiting an- 
other visit from the stork. Morton said 
he was going to have a family of thirteen 
children and doggone if it doesn't look as 
if he meant it! . . . And Pearl Hamilton, 
of the Three X Sisters, is also preparing 
the bassinet. Her husband is Edward 
Santos, the trumpeter . . . Mark War- 
now's brother, Raymond Scott, the com- 
poser and arranger, recently eloped with 
Pearl Stevens. 



MUSINGS OF THE MONITOR MAN 

THERE has been much ado over ace 
NBC announcers like Jimmy Walling- 
ton, Kelvin Keech and Frank Singiser re- 
signing as staff mikemen to become free 
lance broadcasting butlers. Such procedure 
is not surprising for it is human nature to 
want to better oneself; the surprise is 
that more announcers who have estab- 
lished themselves haven't thrown off the 
shackles of the studios. The remunera- 
tion is far better on commercial pro- 
grams, the work is easier and the hours 
shorter. Relieved of the routine of the 
air castles, hopping from one studio to 
another, day in and day out, they are free 
to accept screen and transcription jobs 
and in other ways increase their earning 
capacities. 

Have you wondered why you don't hear 
on the air so much these days as you used 
to such poems as Joyce Kilmer's "Trees," 
Kipling's "Boots and Saddles" and Riley's 
"Old Swimmin' Hole?" The reason is the 
authors' estates or their publishers who 
own the copyrights now exact a fee of 
ten dollars for each reading. The re- 
quirement applies to any of their works. 



AUDREY MARSH, whom you hear as 
Esther in Harv and Esther on the 
Columbia network with Teddy Bergman, 
used to be known as Audrey Mason on 
the radio bills. She discarded the Mason 
as a jinx when she lost out on a couple 
of fine commercial prospects. Her real 
surname, by the way, is Zellman. 

GRACIE ALLEN now thinks George 
Burns is the numbskull of the team. 
It is all because a manufacturer of wo- 
men's hats wanted to put on the market 
a bonnet to be named "Grade's Little Blue 
Hat," and offered $10,000, in cash or its 
equivalent, for the privilege. George de- 
clined on the grounds that the commer- 
cialization of Grade's little blue hat 
would ruin its value for laughs. Grace 
maintains $10,000, deposited in the bank 
to the account of Sandra, their adopted 
baby daughter, would be even a bigger 
laugh. 

DID YOU KNOW— 

That Benay Venuta began her radio 
career on the Pacific Coast not only as a 
singer but also as a continuity writer and 
producer of sketches? . . . That Jessica 
Dragonette was the first radio artist to 
sing before a studio audience? . . . That 



Jean Grombach, producer of many radio 
features, is a graduate of West Point? 
. . . That Forman Brown, the voice of 
the March of Rhyme on Club Columbia, 
once shoveled salt in a pickle factory? . . . 
That Phillips H. Lord was a country 
school teacher before he ever dreamed of 
becoming Seth Parker? . . . That Vir- 
ginia Verrill made her singing debut at 
the age of thirteen as voice double for 
Barbara Stanwyck in the movies? . . . 
That Bert Parks, Columbia announcer 
and singer, started his business career as 
the proprietor of a popcorn stand? 

WMCA, one of New York's enter- 
prising independent stations, has 
been the training ground for many per- 
sonalities now heard on the networks. 
Among those who acknowledge WMCA 
as their alma mater are: Rudy Vallee, 
Jerry Baker, Baby Rose Marie, Don Car- 
ney (Uncle Don), Art Gillham, Helen 
Kane, Ozzie Nelson, Will Osborne, Nor- 
man Pearce, Les Reis and Artie Dunn, 
Dick Robertson, Whispering Jack Smith, 
May Singhi Breen and Peter de Rose, 
Frank Parker, Ann Lester, Arthur Tracy 
and Gabriel Heatter. 



MAJOR EDWARD BOWES, in his 
60's, is the highest salaried man in 
all show business. His income is $19,000 
or more a week, most of which is de- 
rived from his amateur shows on the air, 
on the screen and in the theaters ... It 
is now estimated the year 1935 will drop 
$85,000,000 into the laps of the broad- 
casters of the United States. This will 
exceed by $12,000,000 the best year in the 
history of broadcasting, which was 1934. 
The czars of the air castles know pros- 
perity is here. 



Robbed, He Wrote a Poem About It 

COULD you, on finding your house 
ransacked, your most prized posses- 
sion gone, but a pair of pajamas and some 
books left, write a poem about it? 

David Ross — philosopher, poet, humor- 
ist, ace announcer of the Columbia Broad- 
casting System — did just that, even when 
the robbery involved the loss of his cov- 
eted Gold Medal awarded him by the 
American Academy of Arts and Letters 
for good radio diction. 

Mr. Ross arrived home from a Chester- 
field program to find his rooms despoiled, 
and, his anger still hot, got into the pa- 
jamas, sent the suit out to be pressed, 
then penned the following vilification 
against the robbers: 

Alas poor slithering thief 
Of no avail my golden plaque 
To cleanse the speech you have em- 
ployed, 
Since your barbaric tongue 
Will still pronounce it: 
"Toidy-toid." 

Alas, Demosthenes 

Whose brow is stamped upon the gold 

And broods in silent grace, 

Could he but hear your fetid speech, 

He'd spit his pebbles out 

Upon your face. 

Go, poor squirming scum, 
Melt down the stolen gold 
And sell it for dishonored pence instead; 
And withered be your tongue some day. 
David Ross. 



RADIO MIRROR 



Coast-to-Coast Highlights 
Chicago 

(Continued from page 46) 

a boat enthusiast, had been standing too 
close when a gasoline launch exploded. 
It knocked him flat and made him deaf 

for days. 

* * * 

Although Wayne King expects to do 
a lot of touring this winter he has re- 
newed his lease on the top floor of the 
Hdgewater Beach apartments. The same 
nurse who trained Wayne's little daughter 
is now the boss of young Mr. Weems, 
Ted Weems' boy. 

* * * 

Amos 'n' Andy tried to keep it a secret 
when they went out and bought an air- 
plane. But the news leaked out anyway. 
Now they commute all over the midwest 
by air having breakfast in St. Louis and 
lunch in Peoria. Charles (Andy) Correll 
is learning how to fly from the instructor 
who taught Wayne King to pilot his own 

ship. 

* * * 

When Linda Parker, the Sunbonnet 
Girl of the Cumberland Ridge Runners, 
died following an emergency operation 
for appendicitis recently, most of the 
Greater Sinclair Minstrels went down to 
La Porte, Indiana, for the funeral. Linda 
was the wife of Art Janes, baritone of the 

minstrels' quartet. 

* * * 

Charles Previn, conductor of the Silken 
Strings concerts, and Marcelli. who di- 
rects the music for Fibber McGee and 
Molly, are stabbing at each other daily 
and becoming quite proficient with the 
fencing foils. When Hal Kemp played the 
Palace Theater here, Horace Heidt and 
Mrs. Heidt came backstage after the first 
show and paid Hal such a glowing compli- 
ment on his work that Kemp was dizzy 
for the rest of the day. 

To explain how definitely his band 
governs itself, including Heidt, he drew 
up an organization chart showing special 
committees to handle program planning, 
music arranging, broadcasting, dance mu- 
sic, new talent auditions, education, re- 
creation, advertising, personnel, stage pro- 
ductions and even intermission entertain- 
ment. It's as carefully worked out as a 

plan for a big business firm. 

* * * 

Although Abner of Lum and Abner 
bought himself a cabin express cruiser 
last summer he hasn't used it as much as 
he thought he would. Being a canny 
small town boy he is horrified at the ex- 
pense of the thing, forty gallons of gaso- 
line for an afternoon! So he added a 
little outboard motor. Of course the out- 
board won't push the boat through the 
water very fast but it will keep it mov- 
ing when he and his family are just out 
bumming around. And it runs all after- 
noon on about two gallons of gasoline. 

* * * 

The gang over at NBC were very, very 
sorry when their bosses decided to use 
that waste space on the nineteenth floor 
for more studios. Because that was where 
they played ping pong in off moments. 

* * * 

Mrs. Freeman Gosden, wife of Amos, 
was highly pleased with her visit with 
Dr. Dafoe and the Dionne quintuplets up 
in Canada. She made the trip specially to 
see the babies and has been talking about 
it ever since. 

* * * 

WGN's new studios, adjoining Tribune 
Tower in a new building all their own, 
are really beautiful. Here in one studio 




My dentist said: 

"It's a fine health habit 

lliveryone should chew Dentyne," my dentist 
said. He explained that it gives the mouth ex- 
ercise which it fails to get from our modern 
soft-food diets. It strengthens the muscles and 
helps improve the mouth structure. It helps 
the normal self-cleansing action of the mouth 
. . . and improves the condition of the teeth. 
You'll notice Dentyne's firm consistency that 
is so important in giving you these benefits. 




Jack called it 

t( Wonderful gum " 

IVlen who are particular always like Dentyne 
I find. It has that "different" taste — spicy, 
lively, and refreshing. After trying Dentyne, 
I certainly complimented him on his good 
taste. Notice the handy, flat shape of Dentyne 
— an exclusive feature, making it convenient 
for your purse or vest pocket. 




DENTYNE 

KEEPS TEETH WHITE- MOUTH HEALTHY 



73 



RADIO MIRROR 



ACCEPT FREE 

2 -DRAM BOTTLE OF 

$3 <Qa T^ichesse 

PERFUME! 




To introduce 



LUXOR . . . moisture-proof powder 



Combats shiny nose, conspicuous 
pores, floury blotches 

Y'OU can't possibly have a lovely skin if face 
powder mixes with natural skin moisture 
and lets shine through, clogs pores and 
makes them conspicuous, or forms pasty-look- 
ing blotches. 

So change at once to Luxor, the moisture- 
proof face powder. Prove it yourself. It won't 
even mix with water in a glass. Thus, it won't 
mix with similar moisture on your skin and 
make a harmful paste. 

More than 6,000,000 women stick to Luxor 
because it is moisture-proof. It comes in a range 
of smart new shades, scientifically blended in 
our vast laboratories to flatter brunettes, 
blondes, and in-betweens with gorgeous 
natural effect. 

No powder at any price, contains finer, purer 
ingredients. Insist on Luxor by name, and get 

FREE/ 2- drams of ha Richesse 

a sophisticated, smart French scent, selling reg- 
ularly at $3 an ounce. An enchanting gift to 
win new friends for Luxor. Powder and per- 
fume together in a bright new Christmas wrap- 
per at all cosmetic counters for the price of 
Luxor powder alone. 



1 Moisture-proc 



55 c 

JLm/XQX, face powder 




AMAZING HAND SOFTEN- 
ING CREAM DRIES LIKE MAGICI 



By all means try this spectacular new 
softener for hands. A marvelous ab- 
sorbent cream works right into 
tissues — dries like magic! At 
all cosmetic counters. 



they can seat 600 visitors, a much larger 
number than the biggest of NBC's studios 
can accommodate. In Chicago the Co- 
lumbia network's studios are not equipped 
for any visitors at all. But CBS has been 
using the main ballroom of the Medinah 
Club as a special theater type studio for 

big broadcasts. 

* * * 

Vivienne Segal came all the way from 
New York to Chicago recently because 
the only dentist she likes to have working 
on her teeth is here. 

* * * 

Marion and Jim Jordan, who play the 
amusing parts of Fibber McGee and 
Molly, tell a prize story of under em- 
phasis. Once they were stopping in a 
Kansas boarding house when a bad storm 
hit the town. The house rocked and 
swayed and creaked until Marion was 
really frightened. The landlady knocked. 
When Jim opened the door she said 
calmly, "You folks had better put your 
windows down. Looks like it might 
storm." 

* * % 

Eleanor Holm and Art Jarrett have 
their own orchestra now and both sing 
with it. But Eleanor is probably better 
known as a champion swimmer than as a 
singer. The wife of one of Chicago's bet- 
ter known sports editors asked Eleanor 
how she manages to keep her face out of 



the water when she swims. Apparently 
the wife didn't know Eleanor's medals 
are for back stroke swimming. 
* * * 

This fall sees the advent into Chicago 
of Orville Knapp and his California or- 
chestra. Knapp replaces Wayne King at 
the Aragon ballroom. Incidentally 
Knapps' orchestra features one of those 
new Hammond electric organs which so 
many of the big shots are buying. Rudy 
Vallee has two, one for his band and the 
other for his home. Jan Garber is back 
at the Trianon, both Jan and Knapp 
broadcasting over WGN. 

=K * * 

Also come to Chicago for their first pro- 
longed stay this fall are the Mills Broth- 
ers who are doing a commercial NBC 
series with Art Kassel's orchestra and Hal 
Totten as sports commentator. 

Now local lights are beginning to won- 
der how long Chicago can hold Vivian 
della Chiesa, the beautiful voiced soprano 
WBBM unearthed in its recent public 
auditions for singers. She is on the verge 
of becoming nationally famous and, as in 
the case of Jane Froman, will probably 
migrate to New York. Jane got her build- 
up in Chicago under Paul Whiteman's 
sponsorship before she went to New York 
and national fame. 



Untold Chapters in Grace Moore's Life 



{Continued from page 15) 



The next night, she knew, he was going 
to propose. At the table where he had 
spent so many evenings in the past month, 
he offered her all she had been dream- 
ing. For a moment the career that she 
had been willing to sacrifice everything 
for, was forgotten. She accepted. 

And the moment the announcement was 
made, Grace was assailed by the doubts 
she had refused to listen to before. In- 
stinctively she knew the roar of disbe- 
lief and amazement Park Avenue must be 
setting up, knew that though Robertson 
loved her, revered her, his family would 
waste neither love nor friendship on her. 

Grace had reached the first crossroads 
of her career. She lost no time making a 
decision. Throwing position, Newport, 
gowns, travel to one side, she broke the 
engagement to accept a small part — a 
very small part — with a road company of 
the musical show "Sweet Sixteen." 

Forsaking the chance to sit at tea with 
aristocratic ladies, she fared forth to de- 
light not overly discriminating theater- 
goers west of the Hudson River with 
nightly renditions of "First You Wiggle. 
Then You Waggle." In time, Robertson 
and all he had meant was forgotten. By 
economy so rigid, she tried not to think 
about it, she saved sufficient funds to buy 
passage for Europe. When the tour fin- 
ished, Grace sailed, with barely enough 
money left over to pay rent the first 
month. 

As though acknowledging her brave 
challenge to a doubting world, divine 
Providence intervened. It led her to 
Monte Carlo and an old friend who 
staked her to a fling at the roulette wheel. 
She had never gambled before, but she 
wound up the evening, with proverbial 
beginner's luck, forty thousand francs 
ahead. 

Tucking her new-found fortune in her 
purse, Grace took the first morning train 
for Paris where she enrolled that very 
day with one of France's foremost vocal 
teachers. It was in this gay, magical city 
that, Quixote-like, she had her second 
tilt with the windmills of society. 



In Paris, students enjoy life whether 
they have money to spend or not. Grace 
joined this crowd of fellow countrymen 
and amid innocent revelry on the Left 
Bank, met an art student named Biddle. 
For weeks they shared all the excitement 
that Paris offers young couples in love 
before Grace learned who Biddle really 
was. And when she did, she burst into 
gales of laughter. 

She learned that he was George Biddle 
of Philadelphia, no ordinary art student 
but a son of one of America's oldest and 
wealthiest families. She had laughed 
when she remembered that Biddle was a 
life-long friend of Robertson, and con- 
fessed a story. 

DO you remember where you and 
Markoe often used to dine?" she 
asked, mentioning the name of an exclu- 
sive New York restaurant. "Well, last 
Christmas the girl who shared my apart- 
ment and I found ourselves with just fifty 
cents to buy a holiday dinner. I couldn't 
bear the thought of that, so I telephoned 
Oscar, the head waiter there, and told him 
I was Grace Moore. When he said he'd 
never heard of Miss Moore, I told him in- 
dignantly, 'Why, you must remember me, I 
come there often with Mr. Robertson and 
Mr. George Biddle!' Using your name 
worked like a charm. Oscar fell all over 
himself. I opened up a charge account. 
Marge and I had our Christmas dinner, 
and used our fifty cents for the tip." 

Biddle fell in love with Grace from that 
moment on, and his acceptance of her 
story with a sense of humor she hadn't 
expected to find_ turned the scales in his 
favor. Their friendship ripened as only 
Paris friendships can. In the soft spring 
night that followed, George Biddle 
courted the young singer. When he pro- 
posed, offering her the opportunity to 
sign all future restaurant checks "Mrs. 
George D. Biddle," she accepted. 

She wasn't so certain by now that the 
career she had been so sure of was ever 
going to lead anywhere. Her forty thou- 
sand francs were nearly gone, her voice 



74 



RADIO MIRROR 



instruction was only half finished, and her 
fiance wanted to return home. Though 
she had said she would marry him, she 
suddenly held back. While he was urging 
her to pack, a cable arrived from his 
father. "Come home at once," it ordered, 
"and explain this engagement." 

Biddle returned without Grace, holding 
only her promise to return in the fall. 
Swearing undying devotion, he stepped on 
board the transatlantic liner. Four 
months later, when Grace returned, he 
was waiting. In the taxi uptown, he urged 
a hasty elopement. 

Once more Grace faced security for 
life with a man she found charming and 
engaging or the grim, drawn out battle to 
make good in the entertainment world. 
But her mind was made up. Just as 
firmly, just as kindly as she had Robert- 
son, she sent George away. 

Even five years later, when Grace had 
achieved a measure of success that would 
more than satisfy the average young 
singer, she still held steadfast in her de- 
termination to reach the topmost rung 
before answering love. She had played 
leading roles in several more Broadway 
shows, had scored a triumph in a Metro- 
politan debut. Then came her greatest 
success, the role of Louise in the Opera 
Comique of Paris and the greatest ova- 
tion ever given anyone in the part since 
it was created by Mary Garden. 

r W 1 HE cream of Europe's aristocracy 
joined in that ovation. In a box, his 
enthusiasm flashing in his black eyes, a de- 
scendant of Roman royalty stood up and 
cheered. The Prince de San Faustino, 
a Neapolitan noble of an ancient regime, 
sought and gained an introduction. His 
orchids were first to arrive at her suite 
in the morning. He put his cars at her 
disposal. And he wooed with all the im- 
petuous abandon of his race. Engulfed 
by his ardor, she whispered a hesitant 
"Yes." But no sooner had she time to col- 
lect her thoughts than she regretted. She 
broke the engagement and relinquished 
the opportunity to become a titled lady. 

Italian society had gasped when the en- 
gagement was announced. Now it had 
even a greater shock. A mere singer was 
passing up the chance to become a Prin- 
cess! Stories of how this same Grace 
Moore had snubbed American wealth and 
name were recalled. Ladies asked one an- 
other "What next?" 

Grace answered their question. Next 
came greater fame. Conquest of operatic 
audiences, millions of movie-goers, more 
millions of radio listeners. Her name be- 
came a household word of the tiniest ham- 
let, on the smallest Main Street. What 
next? Tea with Queen Mary, a social 
recognition few are ever destined to re- 
ceive. Park Avenue was as impressed as 
was Italian society when Mussolini fol- 
lowed the Queen's example and extended 
to Grace another invitation to tea — tea 
for two. 

Like the siege of Troy was Grace's 
storming of the citadels of international 
society by refusing the more obvious 
methods of marrying rich young men and 
depending instead on her own abilities. 
Today, fond mothers would boast if their 
offspring were to come home with the 
news that glamorous Grace Moore had 
said "Yes." 

But Grace Moore has already found 
love. Her husband is not listed in the 
Social Register nor has he vast wealth, 
but because they had planned to go away 
for a second honeymoon, King Leopold 
II of Belgium had to countenance a polite 
no" when he invited Miss Moore to 
give a command performance. 

Royalty and society can still cool its 
heels. Grace Moore recognizes only one 
man — Valentin Parrera. 



c7r de luxe DeMe%t..eMti! 



^ ..*<£*. 

•&E& 







butter, melted bs . Spread I ^ or etc V £ k 

Uyer r Sweetened Condensed ^ ^ ^ 
Brand Swe « . sauce . r wlt n 

b eatene * g «a£r crumbs- B£ > or co tf. 
oI l lemon te maining «ac (350 °F .). Serv 

2—.*- {. ^«*'" Ve ? ( side , a „d nice -»«-** 
1. flavored •»•""' 0U \J imI« 'You 




2cupsS raham A 

. (1 can) E * g "dM'uk 
« /sCU Sweetened Condensed ^ 

2 apple sauce 



in m»- . d mce ■»» - But 

W ftavorous inside, ^^ it.» 

must use 

FREE ! New Cook Book of Wonders! 

New! New! NEW! Just off the press! "Magic Recipes" is a thrilling new 
successor to"Amazing Short -cuts. "Gives you brand-new recipes — unbelievably 
quick and easy — for pies, cookies, candies, frostings! Sure-fire custards! Ea6y- 
to-make refrigerator cakes! Quicker ways to delicious salad dressings, sauces, 
beverages, ice creams (freezer and automatic). Address: The Borden Sales Co., 
Inc. Dept. MWG-12S, 350 Madison Ave , New York, N. Y. 




Name. 
Street. 
City— 



State- 



(Print name and address plainly) 
This coupon may be pasted on a penny postcard. 



13oit(e>Hs 

Qua/ctu 




inis coupon may De pasted on a penny postcard. ~^^^^^ 



A 

TIRED 

FACE 

Needs Help 



Whether you're 76 or 60 

Our new Complexion Kit will act 
like magic. 

• Removes blemishes! 

• Re-vitalizes a jaded skin! 

• Imparts a clear, lovely color! 
This ad and $1.00 brings our trial 
kit to you! You will be amazed 
at your beautiful new complexion. 

REVELATION 

COMPLEXION KIT CORP. 

640 Madison Avenue, Dept. C, New York City 




BURNING 
AND TIRED? 



Dust — wind — sun glare — reading — 
tire your eyes. For relief, cleanse them 
daily with Murine. Soothing. Refresh- 
ing. Used safely for nearly 40 years. 



75 



RADIO MIRROR 




TO END THE 
CATHARTIC HABIT 

Try This Improved 
Pasteurized Yeast 
That's Easy to Eat 



p 



[F you take laxatives to keep "reg- 
ular," you know from experience 
that drugs and cathartics^ give only tempo- 
rary relief from constipation. Such remedies 
merely cause a drastic purging action. They 
do not correct the cause of your condition. 

Doctors now know that in many cases the 
real cause of constipation is a shortage of 
the vitamin B complex. This precious factor 
is sadly deficient in the typical every-day 
diet. In many foods it is entirely lacking. 
When this factor is added to the diet in suffi- 
cient amounts, constipation goes. Elimina- 
tion again becomes regular and complete. 

Yeast Foam Tablets are pure pasteurized 
yeast and yeast is the richest known food 
source of vitamins B and_G. They should 
stimulate your weakened intestinal nerves 
and muscles and quickly restore your elimi- 
native system to normal, healthy function. 

With the true cause of your constipation 
corrected, you will be rid of the evil cathartic 
habit. Your energy will revive. Headaches 
will go. Your skin will be clearer and fresher. 

Don't confuse Yeast Foam Tablets with 
ordinary yeast. These tablets cannot ferment 
in the body. Pasteurization makes this yeast 
utterly safe for everyone to eat. It has a 
pleasant, nut-like taste that you will really 
enjoy. And it contains nothing to put on fat. 

All druggists sell Yeast Foam Tablets. 
The 10-day bottle costs only 50c. Get one 
today. Refuse substitutes. 

YEAST FOAM TABLETS 



FREE 



MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY 

You may paste this on a penny post card 
NORTHWESTERN YEAST CO. RG -12-35 

1750 North Ashland Ave., Chicago, III. 

Please send free introductory package of Yeast 
Foam Tablets. 

Name 



Address. 

City State. 



All You Want to Know About Roses and Drums 

{Continued from page 36) 



broadcasters worked with the two girls, 
and on April 8, 1934, played a trick 
on the radio public. On that day, they 
gave both girls the script and they read 
alternate lines of the Betty Graham part. 
Not to themselves, but over the micro- 
phone. No one detected anything wrong. 
The following Sunday, Helen Claire took 
over unaided. It was some time before 
the listeners were aware that Betty Gra- 
ham was being portrayed by another ac- 
tress. 

If you were to add up all the famous 
actors who have appeared at different 
times in Roses and Drums you would 
have one of the greatest all-star casts in 
history. You will remember De Wolfe 
Hopper, Pedro de Cordoba, Osgood Per- 
kins, Walter Connolly, Guy Bates Post 
and Mrs. Richard Mansfield among 
others. 

ACTING for the microphone is a lot 
different from other acting. There 
is one man in the cast of Roses and Drums 
who has developed a truly remarkable 
radio technique. He is Jack Roseleigh. 
Believe it or not, he can by the tone of 
his voice, by a turn of his head, let you 
know whether he is sitting down or 
standing up. By his voice alone! He has 
played about a hundred different roles 
on Roses and Drums. 

The job of matching living voices 
with those of the dead is constantly with 
the men who make Roses and Drums. Re- 
cently they gave us a few flashes of 
P. T. Barnum and Jenny Lind, the 
Swedish nightingale. The voices of these 
two, as famous as any of the soldiers 
of the war, also had to be matched. 

Barnum, we might say in passing, was 
introduced for the same reason that Sid- 
ney Lanier, the tubercular Southern poet 
was — for the sake of variety. Even the 
most devoted listeners would grow weary 
if the program were kept to the war all 
the time. 

The amount of research this program 
requires is staggering. Roses and Drums 
demands more digging into books, manu- 
scripts and ancient records than any other 
program in radio. Just to give you an 
idea of how far the author and director 
will go to be right, they have obtained 
a list of privates in Union and Con- 
federate Armies, and listed them on 
cards. Why? Simply for the sake of ac- 
curacy. When the script requires the use 
of a private's name, the cards are con- 
sulted, a private's name chosen — and this 
name is used. It gives the play authen- 
ticity. Relatives of privates whose names 
were used are reported to have written 
letters of appreciation. 

SO complete and so accurate is the re- 
search that in the preparation of the 
episode dealing with the death of Jeb 
Stuart, the author was able to describe 
the weather for every hour of the day. 
Herschel Williams, the director, has been 
equally thorough. When he proposed to 
introduce a rebel yell, he wanted to have 
it right, a yell that could not be criticized 
by anyone. He located an old Confed- 
erate soldier living several _ hundred 
miles from New York, prevailed upon 
him to give the cry as he had given it 
many years before, and recorded it. The 
record was then used to guide the actors 
participating in the play. 

Maestro Pelletier, who conducts the 
seven-piece orchestra, contributes much 
to the success of the program. He can 
make his seven men sound like a brass 
band, a fife and drum corps or a fifty- 



piece symphony orchestra. And that is no 
small accomplishment. 

The manuscript of Roses and Drums 
is a bulky forty-page affair. It takes a 
long time to write. There is so much de- 
tail to manage that the author has been 
able to keep only four weeks ahead of 
the current program, which is six weeks 
less than is generally required on other 
programs. He is often delayed in the 
preparation of scripts by the necessity of 
taking trips to the actual battle scenes 
to study the terrain. 

When the finished play is okayed by 
Professor Jernegan and passed by the 
network authorities, it is ready for re- 
hearsal. Griggs, who plays Randy, de- 
scribes the process of getting ready for 
the Sunday broadcast as follows: 

"The rehearsal starts on Thursday 
when the entire cast discusses and works 
over the development of the week's 
episode and its characters. On Friday a 
four-hour rehearsal with sound effects and 
on Sunday from twelve-thirty to the 
hour of the broadcast. The long rehear- 
sal gets us into the spirit and atmosphere 
of the play and we go on the air in top 
form. 

"With the characters so well known, 
most of the rehearsal time is given to 
creating the illusion of the story. 

"It was this program which first used 
spotlights in the studio, not for the bene- 
fit of the audience, but to give intensity 
of feeling and theater sense to the actors. 

"The sense of character that, on the 
stage, can be supplied by costume, make- 
up, movement and facial expression, on 
the air depends on the actor's voice. Radio 
is constantly seeking actors who can 
'think with their voices,' who can tell in 
tone of voice what they think and feel 
and are, as well as what they want to 
convey to another character." 

THE actual plot which carries along 
from Sunday to Sunday is fictitious, 
of course, but the story of the activities 
of Civil War spies that is told is based 
on actual fact. Betty Graham is closely 
modeled after Betty Duval and Betty 
Boyd, both spies for the Confederate 
Army. Many of her adventures are those 
of these unsung Betties of Southern 
history. 

So far as Roses and Drums is con- 
cerned, the Civil War is a virtually in- 
exhaustible field for drama. Periodically, 
meetings are held to consider whether 
there should be a change to another 
panorama of history, such as the opening 
of the West or the World War. But al- 
ways the decision is to draw further on 
the rich sources of the inter-state struggle. 

Influencing this decision is the thought 
that, with the end of the Civil War, we 
shall see the culmination of the struggle 
for the hand of Betty, which has been 
going on so long between Randy and 
Gordon. The odds seem to favor Gordon 
although you can never tell. 

One thing is certain, the listeners are 
as interested in this love affair as they 
are in the war. Which rather grieves the 
program makers. Eighty per cent of their 
effort is spent on research and when it is 
over, they find their audience giving it 
divided attention, sometimes lending their 
best ears to the romantic side of the 
story, which is a side requiring no re- 
search at all. 

Still, it should be a comfort to all of 
us, especially those who have lost faith 
in human nature, that people should be 
more interested in romance than in 
bloodshed. 



76 



RADIO MIRROR 



Radio Mirror's Directory 

(Continued from page 48) 

RUFFNER, Edmund "Tiny". Announcer; born 
Crawfordsville, Ind„ Nov. «, 1K99; married Florence 
Kowalewska; debut over NBC, 1930. NY. 
RUSSELL, Johnny. Sinner. Si/zlers Trio; born 
Toledo Ohio, Jan. ll. 1914; unmarried; debut in 
Columbus. Ohio. N. Y. 

RYAN, Babs (Blanche). Singer; bom Davidson. 
Tenn., Jan. 16. 1914; unmarried; debut I'red Waring s 
Pennsylvanias, 1933. N. Y. 

RYAN, Tim. Comedian; partner of Irene Nob ette. 
"Circus Nigbt in Silvertown" ; born Ilayonne. N. J.. 
July 5. 1899; married Irene Noblette; <leliut San l'ran- 
cisco. June 12. 1932. N. Y. 

SAGERQUIST. Eric. Orchestra leader. Campana 
First-NiKlitcr"; born Karlstad. Sweden. Dec. 6. 1898; 
married Leonore Koroppj debut in Chicago, over WI.S. 
September, 1924. CHIC. 

SALATHIEL. Leon. Baritone. 'lone Pictures ; 
born Independence, Kan., Jan. 7, 1904; married Betty 
Sickels; debut in St. Paul. 1923. N. Y. 
SANFORD, Harold. Orchestra leader; born Northamp- 
ton Mass. Sept 5, 1B79; married June Sanford: 
debut over WEAP. June, 1926. N Y. 
SANELLA, Andy. Orchestra leader, Manhattan 
Merry-Go-Round" ; born Brooklyn, N. Y.. 1900; mar- 
ried ; one daughter; debut over WJZ. 1923. N Y; 
SAXE, Henry. Actor. "Sally of the Talkies ; born 
Montreal. Canada. May 19, 1895: married Germame 
Noel LaPierre; debut over W11HM. Chicago. 1931. 
CHIC. „„., TT , , 

SCHREIBER. Mignon. Actress, "The Iloofingbams ; 
born Chicago, Oct. 27. 1907; unmarried; debut over 
WT'AM, Cleveland. June. 1929. CHIC. 
SCHUMANN-HEINK, Ernestine. Contralto; born 
Lichen. Austria, June 15, 1861; widow. N. Y. 
SCOTT, Ivy. Soprano; born on steamer off coast ot 
Java. Feb. 10, 1885; married Fred Earl Walker; one 
son: debut over WEAF. 1925. N Y. ■ 

SEARS. Charles. Tenor. "Temple of Song ; horn 
Hoonestown, 111.. Feb. 8. 1904; married Florence Ed- 
wards; debut over WMAQ. Chicago. March, 1930. 
CHIC 

SEARS, Jerry. Orchestra leader; horn Westboro. 
Mass March 25, 1906; unmarried; debut in New 
York City, 1933. N. Y. , TT ,,, 

SEYMOUR. Anne. Actress. "Grand Hotel . etc., 
born New York City. Sept. 11, 1909; unmarried: 
debut over WL.W. Cincinnati, 1933 CHIC. _ 
SHACKLEY George. Orchestra leader: born Uuincy, 
Mass March 7. 1890; married; one son; debut over 
WIZ. 1922. N. Y. „ ... 

SHEFTER. Bert. Pianist, partner of Morton Gould, 
bom Toltovia. Russia. May 15. 1904: married Edith 
Pearl; one son; debut over KDKA, Pittsburgh, 1921. 

SHELTON. George. Comedian, partner of Tom How- 
ard. "Rudy Valle Variety Hour"; born New York 
City. March 4. 1896; unmarried: debut on Vallee pro- 

SHERRIS.' Marley. Singer. Balladeers Quartet : born 
Toronto. Canada, June 23, 1893; married Mabel 
Let-son: debut in Edmonton. Canada, 1923. N. Y. 
SHIELD, Roy. Orchestra leader. 'Music Magic : 
born Waseca. Minn., Oct. 2, 1893: debut over NBC 
from San Francisco. June. 1931. CHIC. 
SINATRA, Ray. Orchestra leader. Dreams Come 
True"; born Gergenti, Sicily. Nov. 1. 1904; married 
Prima Cordani ; one son. N. Y. 

SISSON. Kenn. Orchestra leader. Hits and Bits : 
born Danbury. Conn.. Aug. 15. 1898; married Emma 
Redner; one son. N. Y. ... _, . 

SKINNER, Cornelia Otis. Monologist ; born Chi- 
cago. 111.. May 30. 1901 ; married Alden S. Blodgett. 
Oct. 2. 1928; debut over NBC, June, 193=;. N. Y. 
SMALL, Mary- Child singer. "Little Miss Bab-0 ; 
born Baltimore. Md.. May 10, 1922; debut on Rudy 
Vallee program, 1933. N. Y. 

SMITH. Homer. Tenor. Southernaires Quartet: horn 
Florence. Ala.. Dec. 2. 1904; unmarried. N. Y. 
SMITH. Whispering Jack. Baritone; horn New York 
City. May 30. 1896: debut in Philadelphia, 1920. N. Y. 
SMYTHE, J. Anthony. Actor. "One Man's Family"; 
horn San Francisco, Calif., Dec. 18; unmarried; debut 
in San Francisco. 1932. SAN F. 

SOUBIER, Cliff. Actor. Sinclair Minstrels. "Uncle 
Ezra's Radio Station", etc.; born Brantford, Ontario. 
Time 25. 1891; married Maria Wood: debut in New 
York Citv. 1930. CHIC. 

STARKEY. Louise. Actress, plays "Clara" in 
"Clara. Lu. 'n' Em"; born Des Moines, Towa, Nov. 
6, 1905; married Paul Mead; debut over WGN, June, 
1930. CHIC. 

STERN. Harold. Orchestra leader; born Russia; 
debut in New York City. 1923. N. Y. 
STEVENS, Leigh. Orchestra leader. "Molle Merry 
Minstrels": born Mt. Moriah. Mo.. Sept. 13. 1909; 
married: debut over WHB, Kansas City. 1923. N. Y. 
STEWART. Paul. Actor, "Easy Aces", etc. ; born 
New York City. March 13. 1908; unmarried. N. Y. 
STOKES, Leonard. Baritone. Songsmith's Quartet; 
born Moultrie. Ga. , Mav, 1904; unmarried; debut in 
New York City. 1927. N. Y. 

STUART, Donald. Comedian, plays "Percy the 
Playwright" in "Carefree Carnival"; horn London. 
England, Dec. 2, 1897; married; debut in Los Angeles, 
1933. SAN F. 

SWARTHOUT, Gladys. Mezzo-soprano; born Deep 
Water. Mo.. Dec. 25. 1904; married Frank Chapman; 
debut over NBC, 1932. N. Y. 

TAYLOR, Eva. Singer; born St. Louis, Mo.. Jan. 
22, 1900; married Clarence Williams; two sons, one 
daughter; debut, 1922. N. Y. 

TEELA, Dick. Tenor; born Oshkosh. Wis.. Jan. 6, 
1910; married Gwyneth Neil. May. 1933; debut over 
NBC. January. 1932. CHIC. 

THIBAULT, Conrad. Singer and actor, "The Log 
Cabin Show"; born Northbridge. Mass., Nov. 13. 1906; 
married Eleanor Kendall; debut over WCAU, Phila- 
delphia. 1932. N. Y. 

THOMAS, John Charles. Baritone: born Myersdale. 
Pa., Sept. 6; married Dorothy Koehler; debut in New- 
ark. N. J. N. Y. 

THOMAS, Lowell. News commentator and author; 
born Woodington. Ohio. April 6. 1892; married Fiances 
SyajJ °ne son: debut over NBC. 1930. N. Y. 
THOMPSON Kay. Singer. "The Hit Parade" ; horn 
?.'•., Louis, Mo.. Nov. 9. 1909; unmarried; debut over 
K\\ L, St. Louis. 1925. N. Y. 

TIZZIE LISH". Comedian. "Al Pearce and His 
Gang ; born Syracuse, N. Y., 1892; unmarried; debut 
ui Los Angeles, 1924. N. Y. 

TODD, Mabel. Singer and comedienne. "Al Pearce 
'" /• ls , Ga J n ? : bo .™ Los Angeles. Calif.. Aug. 13; un- 
m Ai r J e . < lU d ^!i ut Wlth Pearce, 1932. N. Y. 
rVr 7- - E ^. F ed - Master-of-ceremonies. "Care- 
™tt- M nm 'al ; born Macedonia, Iowa. Tan. 6. 1904; 

fowl 19'- "V°N : F * ° Ver K ° IL ' Council Bh,ffs ' 




LOOFL-Miss Nobody thinks she 

Call play someone whispered 

— but when she sat 

down at the piano . . . 

Eileen had never expected to be asked to Grace 
Williams' party. Grace Williams — the leader of 
the most exclusive set in town. 

Eileen was thrilled — yet so frightened. Well, 
she had already accepted Bill Gordon's invitation, 
and now she d have to go through with it. 

That night Bill called for her. "You look ador- 
able," he told her proudly. Eileen wondered how 
the others would feel about her. She soon found out. 

It was while they were playing bridge. "Who is 
that girl with Bill?" she heard someone whisper. 

"I never saw her before." came the reply. "Seems 
nice enough but nobody of importance, I guess." 

Eileen blushed. She'd show that smart croicd a thing 
or two! Soon the bridge tables were pushed away. 

"Where's Jim Blake tonight ?" someone asked. "If 
he were here we could have some music." 

"Jim bad to go out of town on business." came the 
answer. Here was Eileen's chance. Summoning all her 
courage she said. "I can play a little." 

There was a moment of silence. Hesitantly Eileen 
played a few chords— then broke into the strains of "The 
Cuban Love Song." Her listeners sat spellbound — never 
had she played so well. It was almost an hour before 
she rose from the piano . . . later Eileen told Bill a 
surprising story- 

I Taught Myself 




"You may laugh when I tell 



LEARN TO PLAY 
BY NOTE 

Piano Violin 

Guitar Saxophone 

Organ Ukulele 

Tenor Banjo 

Hawaiian Guitar 

Piano Accordion 

Or Any Other Instilment 



you," Eileen began, "but 
I learned to play at home 
without a teacher. I 
laughed myself when ] 
first saw the O. S. School 
of Music advertisement. 
However I sent for the 
Free Demonstration Les- 
son. When it came and I 
saw how easy it all was. 
I sent for the complete 
course. Why. I was play- 
ing simple tunes by note 
from the start. No grind- 



ing practice sessions — no tedious finger scales, ll was 
just as simple as A-B-C. And do you know it only 
averaged a few cents a day!" 

This story is so true-to-life that we want you to send 
for our Free Book and our Free Demonstration Lesson 
at once. They prove just how anyone can easily learn 
to play by note, for a fraction of what old. slow methods 
cost. Select your favorite instrument. The U. S. School 
of Music will do the rest. Mail the coupon today. U. S- 
SCHOOL OF MUSIC, 3 0612 Brunswick Bldg.. New 
York City. 

U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

30612 Brunswick Bldg.. New York City 

Send me your amazing free book, "How You Can 
Master Music in Your Own Home," with inspiring mes- 
sage by Dr. Frank Crane; also Free Demonstration 
Lesson. This does not put me under any obligation. 

Xame 



Address 

Have you 
Instrument Instrument ?. 



77 



STOP A 



COLD 

THE FIRST DAY! 

Drive It Out 
of Your System! 



AC OLD once rooted is a cold of danger! 
. Trust to no makeshift method. 

A cold, being an internal infection, calls for 
internal treatment. A cold also calls for aCOLD 
treatment and not a preparation good for a 
number of other things as well. 

Grove's Laxative Bromo Quinine is definite 
treatment for a cold. It is expressly a cold treat- 
ment in tablet form. It is internal in effect and 
it does four important things. 

Four Effects 

First, it opens the bowels. Second, it checks 
the infection in the system. Third, it relieves 
the headache and fever. Fourth, it tones the sys- 
tem and helps fortify against further attack. 

Grove's Bromo Quinine is distinguished for 
this fourfold effect and it is what you want for 
the prompt relief of a cold. 

All drug stores sell 
/■ Grove's Laxative Bromo 

Quinine. When you ask 
for it, don't let anyone 
switch you to something 
else, for any reason! The 
cost is small, but the 
stake is large! 



A Cold is an 
Internal Infection 

and Requires 
Internal Treatment 




GROVE'S LAXATIVE 

BROMO 
QUININE 



RADIO Ml RROR 



TONEY, Jay. Baritone. Southernaires Quartet; born 
Columbia, Tenn.. Sept. 21. 1896; married. N. Y. 
TR1GGS, Harold. Pianist, partner of Vera Brodsky; 
born Denver, Colo.. Dec. 25; unmarried; debut in 
Chicago, 1930. N. Y. 

TROY, Helen. Comedienne, "Carefree Carnival" ; 
born San Francisco, Calif., 1906: unmarried; debut 
over KYA. San Francisco, 1930. SAN F. 
TUCKER, Madge. Director various children's pro- 
grams and actress; born Centralia, 111.; unmarried; 
debut in Washington, D. C. 1928. N. Y. 
UPTON, Monroe. Comedian, plays "Lord Bilge- 
water" in "Al Pearce and His Gang"; born Bandon, 
Ore.. Aug. 15. 1900; married Bernardine Holdridge, 
193-'; debut in Shanghai, China, 1922. N. Y. 
VALLEE, Rudy. Orchestra ieader and master-of- 
ceremonies, "Vallee Variety Hour"; born Island 
l'ond, Vermont, July 28, 1901 ; married Fay Webb; 
debut over British Broadcasting Co. network, Lon- 
don. 1926; U. S. debut over NBC, 1929. N. Y. 
VAN, Gus. Comedian and master-of-ceremonies; 
born Brooklyn. N. Y., Aug. 12, 1887; married Mar- 
garet Van; debut over KDKA, Pittsburgh, 1922. N. Y. 
VAN BUSKIRK, Inglis. Singer and comedian. "Ron- 
nie and Van"; born Reading, Mass., 1907; unmarried; 
debut in Boston, 1931. CHIC. 

VAN EMBURGH, Harold. Tenor; born Newark, 
N. J., Sept. 21, 1904; married Florence Meskill; one 
daughter; debut over WAAU, Newark, 1925. N. Y. 
VAN HARVEY, Art. Actor, plays "Vic" in "Vic 
and Sade"; born Chicago, Aug. 23, 1883; married 
Marie Paul; debut in Chicago, 1931. CHIC. 
VAN LOON, Henrik Willem. Commentator and nar- 
rator; born Rotterdam, Holland. Jan. 14. 1882; mar- 
ried Helen Criswell, August, 1920. N. Y. 
VANNA, Gina. Soprano, "House by the Side of the 
Road"; born Chicago, March 15, 1914; unmarried; 
debut over WENR, Chicago, 1930. CHIC. 
VIA, Pedro. Orchestra leader; born Madancas, Cuba; 
married; one son. one daughter; debut over WGY, 
Schenectady, 1927. N. Y. 

VINCENT, Elmore. Comedian, plays "Senator Frank- 
enstein Fishface" in "Carefree Carnival"; born 
Amorilla, Texas, June 10, 1908; married Julia Patti- 
son; debut over KJR, Seattle, 1930. SAN F. 
VOORHEES. Don. Orchestra leader; born Allen- 
town. Pa., July 26, 1903; married; debut over CBS, 
September, 1926. N. Y. 

WAINMAN, John. Baritone. "Morning Devotions"; 
horn Jordanville, N. Y. ; married; debut over NBC, 
1928. N. Y. 

WALDEN. Bertha. Actress, "House of Glass"; born 
Vienna, Austria, 1888; widow; debut over NBC, 1933. 
N. Y. 

WEEDE, Robert. Baritone, "Radio City Music Hall 
of the Air"; born Baltimore, Md., Feb. 22, 1905; mar- 
ried; two sons; debut in Baltimore, over WBAL, 1926. 
N. Y. 

WELCH, John. Comedian, plays "Sassafras" in 
"Honeyboy and Sassafras"; born Dallas, Texas, April 
11, 1903; unmarried; debut over WFAA, Texas, 1923. 
N. Y. 

WELLS, Kathleen. Contralto; born Jersey Citv, 
N. J., Feb. 27, 1911; unmarried; debut over WHOM, 
Jersey City, 1931. N. Y. 

WEYANT, Randolph P. Tenor, Songsmith's Quartet; 
burn Wakefield, Kan., Jan. 24, 1904; married; one 
daughter. N. Y. 

WHITE, Bob. Actor. "Sally of the Talkies"; born 
Philadelphia, Pa.. May 20. 1903; married Betty Ray- 
nolds; two sons; debut in New York City, 1927. CFI1C. 
WHITE. Francia. Soprano, "Music at the Haydn's"; 
born Greenville. Texas, Oct. 30; unmarried; debut in 
Los Angeles, 1933. N. Y. 

WHITE, Howard. Pianist, "Landt Trio and White"; 
S«S5, Scranton, Pa., July 31, 1901; married; debut over 
NBC. October, 1928. N. Y. 

WHITE, Joe. Tenor; born New York City; mar- 
ried Maureen Mavourneen; three children; debut on 
Silvertown program. 1924. N. Y. 

WHITE, John. Singer and actor, "Death Valley 
-Uays ; born Washington, D. C. April 2, 1902; mar- 
ried Augusta Postles; debut in New York City, 1927. 
N. Y. 

WHITEMAN, Paul. Orchestra leader and master- 
of-ceremonies. "Whiteman's Music Hall"; born Den- 
ver, Colo., March 28, 1891; married Margaret Liv- 
ingston; debut from the Westinghouse Station, New 
\ork, Feb. 22, 1921. N Y. 

WHITNEY. Edwin M. Actor. "Death Valley Days"; 
born Parma Center, N. Y., March 17. 1877; widower; 
debut over NBC. 1928. N. Y. 

WICKER Ireene. "The Singing Lady"; born 
Quincy, 111., Nov. 24. 1906; married Walter Wicker; 
one (laughter; one son; debut in Chicago. April, 1930. 
C rllL. 

WICKER, Walter. Actor, "Today's Children"; etc.; 
born Morgan Park. III., July 19, 1902; married Ireene 
Seaton; debut in Chicago, 1931. CHIC 
WILKINSON, Jimmy. Baritone, "Kitchen Party"; 
born Cumberland, Md., March 21. 1903; married; debut 
over WBAL, Baltimore, 1924. N. Y. 
WILLSON, Meredith. Orchestra leader, "Carefree 
Larnival , etc.; born Mason City, Iowa, May 18- 
married Peggy Wilson; debut on Atwater-Kent pro- 
gram. WEAF, 1923. SAN F. 

WILSON, Kathleen. Actress, "One Man's Family"; 
born Girard, Kan.. Jan. 15, 1911; married Rawson 
5?»,"I L?^i.T de I'i ,t . ln . San Francisco. 1926. SAN F. 
WILSON, Muriel. Soprano, plays "Mary Lou" in 
Show Boat ; born New York City, June 29; un- 
married. N. Y. 

WINCHELL. Walter. News and gossip columnist; 
born New York City, April 7, 1897; married June 
Magee; one son. one daughter; debut in New York 
City. 19 7 8. N. Y. 

WINNINGER. Charles. Actor, played "Uncle Charlie" 
in Uncle Charlies Tent Show"; born Athens. Wis.. 
May 26, 1884; unmarried; debut in Chicago, 1924. 

WIRGES, William. Orchestra leader, "Hits and 
Bits ; born Buffalo. N. Y.. June 26; married Alice 
May; one son; debut over WEAF. 1924 N Y 
WOLFE. Winifred. Actress, "One Man's Familv" ; 
born San Francisco. Aug. 26, 1922; debut in San Fran- 
cisco. January. 1933. SAN F. 

WONS, Tony. Commentator and poetry reader. 
,J?" use _ "y t,ie side °f the Road"; born Menasha, 
w,s "„!; e £- 2?' 1891 '' married: one daughter; debut 
over WLS, Chicago, 1929. CHIC. 

WRIGHT. William H. Comedian, plays "Zeb" in 
'Eb and Zeb" sketches, "Al Pearce and His Gang"; 
born March 26, 1894; married Nell Peabody ; debut 
with Pearce. 1922. N. Y. 

WYNN, Ed. Comedian; born Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 
9. 1886: married Hilda Keenan; one son; debut over 
NBC. 1930. N. Y. 

YARBOROUGH. Barton. Actor, "One Man's Fam- 
ily"; born Goldthwaite. Texas, Oct. 2; formerly mar- 
ried; one daughter; debut in San Francisco, 1930. 
SAN F. 

YOUNG, Victor. Orchestra leader, "Shell Chateau"; 
born Chicago, Aug. 8, 1900; married Rita Kinnel; 
debut in Chicago, 1929. L. A. 




FREE! 

Special Advertising Offer of 

FACSIMILE DIAMOND FREE ! 

Send the coupon at once and Ret FREE this brilliant, 
glittering % -Carat Facsimile Diamond blazing with biue- 
white fire from its 24 polished facets. Every one guar- 
anteed perfect and flawless. Only the acid test of direct 
comparison can tell these glittering beauties from gems 
costing hundreds of dollars. Wearing them gives you that 
prosperous, successful look. Your friends will admire you 
and envy you. 

To introduce them, we offer for a limited time to send 
you one FREE without any obligation, just to advertise 
them and prove to you their exquisite beauty and bril- 
liance. We hope you'll tell your friends about them. We 
only ask you to send 10c to help pay advertising and post- 
age. Nothing more to pay. 

NOTE— No order will be filled for more than ONE 
sample. Safe delivery guaranteed and fully insured by one 
of America's oldest insurance companies. 

rKEYSTONE~COT DepT T6 "1 

Box 7282, Philadelphia, Pa. 

! Please send me a full % -Carat Facsimile Diamond J 
| without any obligation on my part. I enclose 10c | 

I coin (or 12c in stamps, 20c in Canada), to help pay . 
advertising and postage. Nothing more to pay. 

I Name I 



Address. 
Town . . . . 



I 

.State | 





Mufti 

Cleans gloves, hats, neckties, apparel. Re- 
moves road tar, oil, grease. Saves cleaning 
bills. Mufti dries instantly; leaves no odor, 
no ring. 10c and 30c a bottle. 

■iin-ja:»w;[.i:,n.]:y«wj:iJ! 



PHOTOS ENLARGED £ a ? 

Florentine Oil Colors fl"|(? 
8x10 - 7x9 - 6y 2 x&V 2 3* t Z r n 

Amazing. Lifelike, in natura, colore. Buet. 
full length. Et-; Made from anv size Photo. 
Snapshot, or Film. ORIGINALS RE- 
TURNED WITH ORDER. SPECIAL; 
THREE DIFFERENT 8x10— $1.00 FOUR 
6x8 or 5x7 — $1.00 11x14 — 60c. TWO 
11x14 — JLOo 6x8 or 6x7— Framed. 80c. 
8x10 Completeiv Framed — $1.00. All painted 
in royal oil colore. Send no money unless you 
wish. Pay Postman Plus Poetaee. Catalog 5c. 

MONARCH STUDIOS. RG-36. MeAdoo, Pa. 



VEGETABLE 
CORRECTIVE 

DID TRICK 

They were getting on each 
other's nerves. Intestinal 
sluggishness was really the 
cause — made them tired 
with frequent headaches, 
bilious spells. But that is all 
changed now. For they dis- 
covered, like millions of 
others, that nature provided 
the correct laxatives in 
plants and vegetables. Tonight try Nature's 
Remedy (NR Tablets). How much better you 
feel — invigorated, refreshed. Important — you 
do not have to increase the dose. They con- 
tain no phenol or 
mineral deriva- 
tives. Only 25c — 
all druggists. 




TONIGHT 

TOMORROW ALRIGHT 



pppr, Beautiful 5 Color— 1935-1936 Calendar Ther- 
r nLLi mometerwith the purchase of a25c box ofNRpr 
alOc roll of Turns (For Acid Indigestion). At yourdruggists. 



RADIO MIRROR 



Amateurs at Life 

(Continued from page 44) 

could watch. Tad was whistling now. I lu 
imitated Crosby and the singer with Ted 
Weems. Then he did his bird calls. 

It was a smashing success for half of 
the team of Byron and Crail. Mickey 
could see that Tad had won the crowd. 
Instinctively she also knew that no one 
had missed her, unless it was Tail. She 
waited until the last hand clap before 
walking to Tad's side. 

"Where were you?" he asked. "We 
waited hours." 

Mickey didn't explain. What was the 
use? The rest of the party passed in a 
blur. 

There was so much to do the next two 
days that Mickey never found herself 
alone with Tad. If he wasn't with Mar- 
ion, she was with one or another of the 
young Van Biddle male guests. She 
learned the first day that wealth didn't 
prevent boys from being good looking, at- 
tentive, and very nice. The third morn- 
ing, before Tad was up, she asked for a 
car to take her into New York. She 
went straight to Uncle Jim and un- 
burdened herself. 

"Uncle Jim, we've just got to get Tad 
out of here. He's taking things too much 
for granted, as though all anyone had to 
do in this life was to be attractive and 
gay. He's never been lazy before and now 
he acts as though he were planning to 
stay on that estate until snow flies." 

I'M sorry this is happening to you, 
Mickey," he said. "I've seen the same 
thing so often before. If Tad would only 
stop now it would be all right. But he 
won't. He'll drift on, being gay and 
charming and staying places as a house 
guest until he's lost all his ambition. 
When it's too late, he'll want to settle 
down. You go back and tell him that. 
Make him see." 

All the way to Westchester, Mickey 
thought up arguments. She hoped she'd 
find Tad as soon as she got there; per- 
haps she could overwhelm him at the out- 
set. He was finishing breakfast on the 
porch when she arrived. Without pre- 
liminaries, she started in. 

"Tad, we can't accept this hospitality 
any longer. We'll have to leave today. 
Besides, we'd be much better off doing 
nothing in Poughkeepsie. At least may- 
be we'd find work to do there." 

He stretched and lit a cigarette. "Just 
my sentiments, little one. Honest work 
never hurt." He drew a letter from his 
pocket and threw it in her lap. 

Mickey knew before she opened it, 
from the look on Tad's face, that it was 
an offer. She read it through once and 
remembered every word. 

"Isn't that the nuts?" Tad exclaimed. 
"A commercial program wanting me for 
spot broadcasts at a hundred per!" 

For once, Mickey's sense of humor 
failed her. It was hard enough holding 
back the tears but there must be a sunny 
side somewhere — perhaps the fact that a 
month from now Tad would be so sick 
of this he'd be the one wanting to leave. 
After all, doing one novelty number every 
week or so could become deadly boring. 

She clung to that hope and managed to 
cheer up when they were ready to leave 
by noon. She could even have enjoyed 
the drive into town if it hadn't been for 
the farewells in the front hall. 

Tad had stood a moment, holding Mar- 
ion's hand. Everything had been said in 
the way of thanks for a wonderful time. 
He and Marion had just looked at each 
other a moment. "Goodbye," Tad had 
said simply, and Mickey couldn't avoid 



Kidneys Must 
Purify Blood 




To Bring 
Vitality, Clear Skin 
and 
Youthful Looks 



Women Need Help More Often Than Men 



The only way your body can clean out Acids and poison- 
ous wastes from your blood is tliroufli 9 million tiny, deli- 
cate Kidney tubes or filters. If. because of functional 
troubles, your Kidneys get tired or slow down in their 
work, these poisons remain in the system and make your 
eyes look dull and your skin coarse and dry. and at the 
same time you find yourself all Tired-Out, Nervous, and 
unable to keep up with the speed of modern life. 

Functional Kidney troubles also may cause much more 
serious and disagreeable symptoms such as Getting Up 
Nights. Lept Pains, Backache. Circles Under Eyes, Dizzi- 
ness Rheumatic I'ains, Acidity, Burnlnc, Smarting and 
Itching. 

Any Doctor can tell you that the speed of modern life 
and present day foods throw an extra heavy load on the 
Kidneys, and that most people need help from time to 
time if they are to feel their best and preserve their youth- 
ful appearance. Fortunately, for sufferers, it is easy to 
help functional Kidney Troubles with the Doctor's guar- 
anteed prescription Cystex, which now is available at all 
drug stores under a positive guarantee to satisfy completely 
or cost nothing. 

Doctors Praise 
Cystex 

Doctor T. J. Rastelli. famous Doctor, 
Surgeon, and Scientist, of London, 
says: "Cystex is one of the finest 
remedies I have ever known In. my 
medical practice. Any Doctor will 
recommend it for its definite benefit 
in the treatment of many functional 
Kidney and Bladder disorders. It Is 
safe and harmless." And Dr. C. Z. 
Rendelle, another widely known Phy- 
sician and Medical Examiner, of 
San Francisco, recently said: "Since 
the Kidneys purify the blood, the 




Dr. T. J. Rastelli 



poisons collect in these orcans and must be promptly 
Hushed from the system, otherwise they re-enter the blood 
stream and create a toxic condition. I can truthfully 
recommend the use of Cystex." 

World-Wide Success 

Cystex is not an experiment, but is a proven success 
in 31 different countries throughout the world. It is pre- 
pared with scientific accuracy in accordance with the strict 
and rigid standards of the United States Dispensatory and 
the United States Pharmacopoeia, and being designed 
especially to act In the Kidneys and Bladder Is swift and 
safe in action. Most users report a remarkable improve- 
ment in 48 hours and complete satisfaction In 8 days. 

Guaranteed To Work 

Because of its unusual success, Cystex is offered under 
an unlimited guarantee to do the work to your complete 
satisfaction in 8 days, or money back on return of empty 
package. Under this unlimited guarantee you can put 
Cystex to the test and see exactly what it can do In your 
particular case. You must feel younger, stronger, and 
better than you have in a long time — you must feel that 
Cystex has done the work to your complete satisfaction or 
you merely return the empty package and It costs you 
nothing. Tou are the sole judge of your own satisfaction. 
Cystex costs only 3c a dose at druggists, and as the guar- 
antee protects you fully, you should not take chances with 
cheap. Inferior, or irritating drugs, or delay. Ask your 
druggist for guaranteed Cystex (pronounced Slas-Tex) 
today. 



m 



.■">.? 



wm> 



Like NEW/ 



|PAYS2£«7SS»HOUR 

NU refinishes any color automo- 
bile easily, quickly and economically 
without polishing-, waxing.rubbingorpainting'. 
JUST WIPE IT ON WITH A CLOTH ! 
Magic-like fluid covers old paint with tonjih, 
elastic coat. Absolutely transparent, eelf- 
leveling, aelf-polishine;. Guaranteed. leasts 8 
to 12 months. Egnal in beauty tn repaint job 
costing $25 to $75. Write for Free Sample to 
Drove oar claims and Territory offer hAh-NU 
CO., uept.T-90, Oakley Sta., Cincinnati, O. 



ANY PHOTO ENLARGED 



Size 8 x lO inches 
or smaller if desired. 
Same price for fall length 
or bust form, groups, land- 
scapes, pet 



nlargen 



ntsof t 



47 



parZofgroup picture. Safe 
retain of original photo 
guaranteed. 

SEND NO MONEY JffXtt 

(any size) and within a week you will receive 
your beautiful life-like enlargement, guaran- 
teed fadeless. Pay postman 47c ploa postage— 
or send 49c with order and we pay postage. 
Big 1 6x20-inch enlargement sent C. O. D. 7Sc 
plus postage or send 80c and we pay postage 
this amazing offer now. Send your photos today. Spe< 

STANDARD ART STUDIOS 
104 S.Jefferson St. Dept. 1545-w, CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 




3 51 PROVE in 7 Day* Kan 
maUeVOUaNEWMAM 



KveD in tne flrst ween i wiii ^ruve l 
can give you a powerful body of might 
and muscle — with my quick Dynamic 
Tension methodl 

Mail coupon below — and I'll send 
you absolutely free, my new book. 

"Everlasting Health and Strength." Eleveah 
,-i-,ti?is that chanced me from ay7-pOund wcnklinz 
to twice-wiiiHcr of title. 'World'? Most Perfectly 
Developed Man." Shows how I can build you 
a champion body the earns easy way! 



and I 



i bis. powerful museiea. increase J 
amasing strength, vitality, pep! 

And I've Rot no use for pills, or for c mtraptioas 
that mar strain you. My <ialura' Dynamic Ten- 
sion method develops real men. inside and out! 
Banis-hf s constipation, bad hrcath, pimples. 

Send NOW for free copy of my book filled with 
pictures and bodv faots. Find out how I can 
make you the husky, big-mnsclod NEW MAN 
you can br! Mail coupon TODAY CHARI.E> 
ATLAS. DepL 5312, 115 " 



CHARLES ATLAS. Dept. 5812. 115 E. 23 St., N. Y. C. 

;OW Dynamic Tension can make me a 



Address I 




FREE BOOK 

MAIL 
COUPON 

AT 
ONCE 



79 



RADIO MI RROR 




"3 min° teS 

of myti me,,, 

and 1 forgot 

my troubles!" 



There's no doubt about it — the three-min- 
ute way certainly makes a difference. 
Three minutes chewing FEEN-A-MINT, 
the delicious chewing-gum laxative — then 
good-bye constipation and the logy way it 
makes you feel. Have you been using rack- 
ing "all-at-once" cathartics? Then you 
know what cramps and griping are. The 
three-minute way is easy, thorough, and 
oh so efficient! It's good for the entire 
family — and children love it. 




THE CHEWING-GUM LAXATIVE 



Ablest CRAY HAIR 

REMEDY IS 
MADEATHOME 

VOU can now make at home 3 
■*■ better gray hair remedy than 
you can buy, by following: this 
simple recipe : To half pintof 
water add one ounce bay rum, 
I a small box of Barbo Com- 
pound and one-fourth ounce 
of glycerine. Any druggist 
can put this up or you can 
mix it yourself at very little 
cost. Apply to the hair twice 
a week until the desired 
shade is obtained. Barbo imparts color to streaked, 
faded, or gray hair, makes it soft and glossy and 
takes years off your looks. It will not color the 
Bcalp, is not sticky or greasy and does not rub off. 

BUSY HOUSEWIFE EARNS 




$ 



400 




Mrs. F. McE. (Penna.) 
thought it was too good 
to be true when she 
read that Chicago 
School of Nursing stu- 
dents were often able 
to earn $25 a week 
while learning "prac- 
tical" nursing. How- 
ever, she sent for the 
booklet offered in the 
advertisement and after much careful thought de- 
cided to enroll. Before she had completed the sev- 
enth lesson she was able to accept her first case — in 
three months she had earned $4001 

Think of the things you eould do with $4001 

CHICAGO SCHOOL OF NURSING 

r.in train you, as it has trained thousands of men 
and women, at home and in your spare time, for the 
dignified, well-paid profession of Nursing. Course Is 
endorsed by physicians. Lessons are simple and easy 
to understand. High school education not necessary. 
Complete nurse's equipment included. Easy tuition 
yaymtnte. Decide today that you will be one of 
thousands of men and women earning $25 to $3 5 a 
week as trained practical nurses! Send the coupon 
for interesting booklet and sample lesson pages. Learn 
how you can win success, new friends, happiness — 
as a nurse. 



CHICAGO SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Dept. 1812, 26 North Ashland Boulevard, Chicago, III. 
Pleaso send free booklet and 32 sample lesson pages. 



City. 
80 



State- 



seeing the look that passed between them. 

Back in New York, in their rooms, 
Mickey had a phone call from Uncle Jim. 
His sponsors wanted Byron and Crail for 
a return engagement on the Hour. "Et 
tu, Brute?" she said. "Do you have to 
turn against me, too?" 

"Sorry, Mickey, it's the way this game 
works," Uncle Jim replied. 

For their second broadcast, Tad de- 
cided they must have a new song. He 
also decided that this time he would sing 
as well as whistle. "Because the Van Bid- 
dies liked your voice?" Mickey snorted, 
but Tad was impervious to sarcasm. 

They rehearsed until Mickey thought 
she'd go crazy. Not until the following 
Thursday was Tad satisfied. Then, in- 
stead of rehearsing, Tad took her around 
during the day. The spot broadcasts he'd 
been offered didn't start for another ten 
days, so he had time to play. 
_ Eventually it was Sunday again. "This 
time," Tad declared, "we win and no two 
ways about it." 

Tad was not exaggerating. By nine- 
thirty Sunday night, there was no longer 
any doubt as to the winner of the eve- 
ning's Hour. Byron and Crail were over 
a thousand votes ahead. Uncle Jim an- 
nounced into the mike, when the last act 
had finished: 

"Unless I'm very much mistaken, we 
have a new pair of winners. They are 
Byron and Crail, the two kids from 
Poughkeepsie you heard two weeks ago." 

The votes that straggled in between 
ten and ten-thirty only swelled their lead. 
Uncle Jim came over to congratulate 
them. "You start your week at the Cen- 
tury, Friday. Better have a third song 
in reserve, for encores. And remember, 
you're professionals now." 

TAD said, "Okay, Uncle Jim. We won't 
forget all you've done for us when 
our names are in the bright lights." 

It was Tad's careless reply, really, that 
did the trick. Mickey didn't say any- 
thing that night, but the next morning 
she took the bull squarely by the horns. 

"Tad, I've been itching to say this for 
a long time. Now that we've won first 
prize, I can't hold it back any longer." 

"Go ahead, shoot," Tad said. 

"All right, look. We came down here 
on a lark. We've had all the excitement 
and more than we were looking for. 
What else do you expect from an ama- 
teur hour? You can't just put aside all 
the plans you've been making for the past 
four years. Let's go back. I don't mean 
right now, but after our week at the Cen- 
tury. We don'f want to be entertainers 
all our lives, do we?" 

"Sure, why not?" Tad said. 

The utter futility of arguing broke 
Mickey. Without caring whether anyone 
was watching, she began to cry. This 
wasn't Byron and Crail. It couldn't be 
— not at swords' points. Her shoulders 
shook with sobs of chagrin. 

"Hey Mickey, darling, you know I 
can't stand tears," Tad said, his voice 
softer than Mickey had ever heard it. 
"Don't let it get you down. I didn't know 
you felt that way. We'll go home tomor- 
row, if you say." 

"Not tomorrow, after our week at the 
theater," Mickey replied, drying her tears. 

"Okay, that's a promise." ■ Tad said 
cheerfully. "A week from Thursday 
we're off — for good. Now forget it, huh? 
We have a new song to learn this week." 

Mickey always remembered that first 
afternoon at the Century. Everything 
was so foreign to her — the backstage ac- 
tivity, with its chorus girls in tights and 
brassieres, singers in full evening dress, 
workmen in grimy overalls; battered 
dressing rooms that had been the goal of 




MAKE 

BLOND HAIR 

-even in DARK shades 

GLEAM with GOLD 

in one shampoo WITHOUT BLEACHING 

Girls, when your blond hair darkens to an in- 
definite brownish shade it dulls your whole 
personality. But you can now bring back the fas- 
cinating glints that are hidden in your hair and 
that give you personality, radiance — beauty. Blondex 
brings back to the dullest and most faded blond 
hair the golden beauty of childhood, and keeps 
light blond hair from darkening. Brownish shades 
or hair become alluring without Bleaching or dyeing, 
camomile or henna rinsing. Try this wonderful 
shampoo treatment today and see how different it 
is from anything you have ever tried before. It is 
the largest selling shampoo in the world. Get 
Blondex today at any drug or department store. 



STOPPED IN ONE MINUTE 

Are you tormented with the itching tortures of eczema, 
rashes, eruptions, or other skin afflictions? For quick 
and happy relief, UBe cooling, antiseptic, liquid D. D. D. 
Prescription. Its gentle oils soothe the irritated and 
inflamed skin. Clear, greaseless and stainless — dries 
fast. Stops the most intense itching instantly. A 35o 
trial bottle, at drug stores, proves it — or money back. 

D.D.D. PAsAc/U&tlorvb 



gy.i:^m ; Y 



YDS 




ALSO BARGAIN 

EXTRA5-CIVEN 



Ginghams, Percates. Prints. Voiles, 
Chambrays, Shirtings, Crepes, etc. 

Varioun lengths, latest assorted colors, 
all included in this bargain bundle, at a 
big saving 



,2 BUNDLES 

$ 189. 



Ftt.Vii 




PHOTO Enlar gements 



Clear enlargement, bast, fall 
length or part group, pets or 

other subjects made from any pho- 
to, snapshot or tintype at low price 
of 49c each; 3 for $1.00. Send as 
many photos as you desire. Re-. 
turn of original photos guaranteed 

SEND NO MONEY 

Just mall photo with name and ad- 
dress. In a few dava postman will •»/('? ^1 00 
deliver beautiful enlargement that ■* • '■ " 
will never fade. Pay only 49c plus postage or send 
60c— 8 for $1.00, and we will pay postage ourselves. 
BEAUTIFULLYrDCflToacqUAintyoa tl x 14 inches 
CARVED FRAMErlfttSwith tVeHIGH ? „ ". , 
quality of our work we will frame, antil further notice, an pastel col- 
ored enlargements FREE. Illustrations of beautifully carved frames 
for yonr choice will be sent with your enlargement Don't delay Act 
now. Mailyour Photos today. Write NEW ERA PORTRAIT COMPANY 
11 E. HURON STREET. DEPT. «80 CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 



FREE LESSOM 

\ HomeArtCrafts 



GOOD MONEY FOR SPARE TIME 

> new easy way. Art novelties in bit; demand. Get free 

on and quickly learn to decorate Gifts, Bridge Prizes, 

Toys, etc. No experience necessnry. Anyone can 

succeed with simple "3-atcp" method, and you earn 

9 you learn. Everything furninhcd. including Biipply 

of Novelties for you to decorate and Homecrafters 

NO CANVASSING 

Just sit at home and make up 
fo $60 a week spare time or 
full. Write today for bis: il- 
lustrated book and FIRST 
LESSON FREE. Absolutely 
not one cent to pay. Lesson 
is free. Openings in every 
locality. Write quick. 

FIRESIDE INDUSTRIES 
DepL 34-w, Adrian, Mich. 



RADIO MIRROR 



so many young actors; the sudden hush 
before the show began. 

It was a full house she and Tad faced. 
The theater orchestra crashed into its 
number, quieted down to a barely audible 
accompaniment, then Mickey began. 

That night, after the last show, Tad 
came to her in her dressing room. 
"Mickey, if I never say it again, you were 
swell! And wear that dress some time 
for me when we're old and gray and have 
swapped husbands and wives." 

Wednesday night, the next to the last, 
the doorman at the theater knocked on 
Mickey's door as she was putting on the 
last touch of make-up. "Man downstairs 
to see you," he called, "name of Ahern." 

"Send him up," Mickey replied, idly 
trying to remember whom she knew in 
New York. Someone knocked again. She 
opened the door to admit a total 
stranger, a short, dark man with a 
friendly, toothy smile. 

"Miss Crail?" he began, and without 
waiting for an answer, went on, "I'm Les 
Ahern, from the Gable Advertising 
Agency. Will you come to see me in the 
morning? I'm pretty sure I'll have a 
job for you, something in the radio line. 
Mere's my card and the address." He 
backed out. "Don't forget. Ten o'clock. 
I'm counting on you." 

Mickey was glad the man hadn't 
pressed for an answer. There was 
only one thing to do. Refuse. Wasn't 
she going home tomorrow, with Tad? 

SOME inner sense kept her from telling 
lad about the offer. In a week, it 
would be forgotten anyway. Yet, when ten 
o'clock the next morning came and went, 
she felt a definite sense of relief. And 
each succeeding hour that passed she per- 
sonally gave a shove to hurry its exit. 
At last it was eleven thirty and they had 
finished their last performance. 

They stood together outside Mickey's 
dressing room, Tad's arm carelessly 
draped over her shoulder. 

"Mickey," he began, and hesitated. 

"What is it, Tad?" she asked. 

"Mickey," he started again. "I've had 
a definite offer for a radio program. It's 
a novelty half hour every afternoon and 
they want to put me on a regular salary 
for three weeks." 

He paused, but Mickey was silent. 

"You're making it tough for me," he 
said. 

"Go on," she urged, quietly. 

"I know how you feel about all this, 
how you think we should have been home 
a week ago. Mickey, I'm staying. Maybe 
the best way out of this is for you to go 
back. But I'm staying." 

Mickey heard a rustle of skirts on the 
stairs. "Is that you, Tad?" someone called. 
It was Marion. She came on up to them. 

"Be right with you," Tad told her. He 
put out his hand. "Goodbye, Mickey. It's 
all been swell and I'm sorry you can't see 
things my way. Will you write me?" 

"What's this?" Marion asked. "You 
aren't going home!" When Mickey half 
nodded, she said, "But that's so absurd. 
You two are just getting started." 

"I know," Tad said, "I've told her that. 
But she seems to have her mind made up. 
Well, kid, wish me good luck." 

Then he was gone. Mickey went into 
the dressing room and stood in front of 
the mirror, staring at her reflection. 
Marion had been swell. Tad too. It was 
really nobody's fault. She shivered a 
little, braced herself and said, half aloud, 

"Okay, Crail, your move now." 

What happens to Mickey? Does she go 
back alone to Poughkeepsie? What 
changes the whole course of her life is 
revealed in the absorbing next installment 
in the January issue, out November 26. 



Ikinny weak nervous 

'RUNDOWN ? ScienceSays Feed" locU 
iStorved Glands to add 5 Lbs. inlWeek? 
6am New Strength and Energy],' 






AS the result of tests covering 
thousands of weakened, rundown, 
-nervous, skinny folks, science now 
claims th;it it Is CJLANDS STAItVINU 
FOB IODINE that keep you pale, 
tired-out, underweight and ailing. 
When those glands don't work properly, 
all the food in the- world can't help 
you. It Just Isn't turned Into "stay- 
there" flesh, new strength and energy. 

The most Important gland — the one 
Which actually controls hotly weight — 
needs a detlnUe ration of iodine all the 
time— NATURAL ASSIMILABLE 
IODINE— not to he confused with 
chemical iodides which often prove 
toxic. Only when the system gets an 
adequate supply of iodine can you reg- 
ulate mctaholism — the hotly" s process 
of converting digested food into rich, 
red blood and cell tissue. 

To get this vital mineral in con- 
venient concentrated and assimilable 
form, take Kelpamalt — now recognized 
as the world's richest source of this 
precious substance. It contains HiOO 
times more iodine than oysters, once 
considered the best souree. 6 tablets 
alone contain more NATURAL. IODINE 
than 486 lbs. of spinach or 1,387 lbs. 
of lettuce. 

Try Kelpamalt for a single week and 
notice the difference. See flattering 
extra pounds appear in place of scrawny 
hollows. At once you get a splendid 



appetite, night-long sleep, y 
fee! better and have new strcn 
energy. If you don't gain at 



ou will 



»1.00 tur- 
tle of G" 



appetite, night-long sleep, you win 
feel better and have new strength and 
energy. If you don't gain at least f. 
lbs. In one week the trial is free. 100 
jumbo tablets are 4 to 5 times the Blze 
of ordinary tablets and cost but a few 
cents a day to use. Try it today. Sold 
at all good drug stores. If your dealer 
has not as yet received his supply, send 
"or special introductory size bot- 
15 tablets to tbe address below. 

Kelpamalt 

KNOWN IN ENGLAND 
AS VIKELP 



SPECIAL FREE OFFER 

Write today for fnecinntinK instructive 50- 
paite book on How to Build Up Strcnctli 
and Wcieht Quickly, Minernl Contents of 
food and their effects OH the human bodv. 
New fncts about NATURAL IODINE. 
Standard weight and measurement charts. 
Daily menus for weight building. Absolutely 
free. No obligation. Kelpamalt Co., Dept 
COO, 27-33 Wr-st 20th St.. New York City. 



This FRAME is FREE 

with each PHOTO or 

SNAPSHOT 
ENLARGEMENT 

for only 98^ 




Simply send us your PHOTO 
or SNAPSHOT, and in about 
one week you will receive a 
Beautiful Enlargement, ex- 
actly like the original, in this 
ARTISTIC Chromium plated 
standing or wall frame, sizes 

p X 7, 8 X 10. or 10 X 12— only 98c. 
SPECIAL: 11 x 14. 10 x 16. 14 x 20. or 
16 X 20. Enlargements (imfrnmed). with 
hand-colored Button of vour Photo 89c. 
^£>nrt Na Mnnpul 3mt P av rnuilman pri.e of cnlurscmcnt desired 
Oena nO mOliey: p i UB poBtiieo. Or rcn.it with order nnd we pay 
postage. Originola returned. Send Photo today. You'll be delighted. 
ALTON ART STUDIOS. Dept. S12A.48S6N.DamenAve., Chicago 




ELECTRIC 

HAIR 
i WAVER -i 

1 COMPLETE ' 



Gives Natural Wave in 
20 Minutes at Home 

At last! Wave your hair at home 
s{ with Safe-Kurl — amazing new 
► Electric Hair Waver! Takes only 
20 minutes to give yourself any 
ype wave, and dry your hair. 
SAFE, gentle heat puts in soft, 
natural, beautiful, permanent-typ. 
itifls, waves, ringlets, rolls tha 
last. No more high beauty-shop 
oills. No more tedious, uncomfort 
able "over-night' curiers an ' 
crinii.er-. Safe-Kurl gives you professional 
nave quickly, easily, safely — by electricity. 

Guaranteed by 12- Year-Old Electrical Firm 
Plugs into any light socket. Uses any ordinary houschol • 
current, AC or DC or home light plant current. Will last 
lifetime. Made of finest materials. Customer writes: 'Safe- 
Kurl saves me money and keeps my hair waved perfectly . 
Takes only a few minutes to use." SEND NO MO.N'El I 
Pav postman only SI. 95. plus few cents postage, when he 
delivers vour Waver, ready to use. Nothing else to buy. 
Complete directions included. Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money back. Mail order today. 
Safe-Electric Co. Dept. T-219 Cincinnati. Ohio 




Hair 

OFF BE 

I once looked like this. Ugly hair on 
Unloved ' ace ' ■ un J° vec ' discouraged. 

Nothing helped. Depilatories, waxes, 
liquids .even razors failed. Then I discovered a 
simple, painless, inexpensive method. It worked! 
Thousands have won beauty and love with the secret. 
My FREE Book, "How to Overcome Superfluous 
Hair," explains the method and proves 1 actual suc- 
cess. Mailed in plain envelope. Also trial offer No 
obligation. Write Mile. Annette Lanzette, P. O. Box 
4040. Merchandise Mart. Dept. 185, Chicago. 



Stop 

Itching 

Skin 



It's wonderful the way soothing, cool- 
ing Zemo brings relief to itching, burn- 
ing skin, even in severe cases. You can 
feelitching fade away when Zemo touch- 
es the tender and irritated skin, because 
of its rare ingredients. To relieve the 
itching of Rashes and Ringworm and 
comfort the irritation of Eczema and 
Pimples, always use clean, /c=^ 
soothing Zemo. All drug- f- 
gists', 35c, 60c and $1. 




RADIO MI RROR 



NEW CREAM MASCARA 

needs no water to apply — 
-b^ really waterproof! 



^^^ 




Beauty authorities — and women everywhere 
• — are praising Tattoo, the new cream mas- 
cara that actually keeps lashes silken-soft 
instead of making them brittle. More water- 
proof than liquid darkeners; far easier 
to apply than cake mascaras! Simply 
Squeeze Tattoo out of the tube onto 
"the brush, whisk it over your lashes 
and there they are . . dark, lustrous 
and lovely, appearing to be twice 
their actual length! Can't smart. Ab- 
solutely harmless. Cry or swim all 
you like; Tattoo won't run or smear! 
Tattoo your lashes once and you'll 
never go back to old fashioned 
mascara. In smart rubber lined satin 
vanity, with brush, 50c everywhere. 




SEND FOR 30 DAY TUBE 

TATTOO, 11 E. Austin Ave., Dept M12 Chicago 
10c enclosed. Please send 30 day tube Tattoo 
Cream Mascara with brush. □ Black D Brown 
□ Blue (Check color desired) 



State. 



TATTOO 




married women No experu-ncu needed 
Big pay full or part time — up to $23.75 in a week. Even 
housewives get cash first day — latest stylei 
ind crepe at special bargain prices. Your ov 

j urnisbed without cost Writo quick for frt 

ISend oo monev — nut name o 

I. V. SEDLER CO., INC. 
Dept. 20-12 Cincinnati, Ohio 



WW** 

Now Only 

10 



RVz Price 




AFTER 

10 Day 

FREE Tkis I ^^^u AR J^mo 

No Money Down 

Positively the greatest bargain ever offered. A genuine lull sized 
S1UO office model Underwood No. 5 for only $39.99 (cash) or 
on easy terms. Has up to date improvement:: including stand- 
ard 4 row keyboard, baekspacer, automatic ribbon reverse 
fihiftlock key 2 color ribbon, etc. The perfect all purpose 
lypewriter. Completely rebuilt and FULLY GUARANTEED 



Learn 


louch 


Typewriting 


CourM 
Sunt 
By.ton 
en»ily 
ir>« Id 


f-u IH 
of the 

Bpeed 

—fully 

Ir.'irrK"! 

OII.T 


3itiu Study) 

FamouB Van 

Typewriting 

illustrated, 

uven dur- 



Lowest Terms — 10c 



Day 



Money-Back Guarantee 

Send coupon lor 10 day Trial 
— if you decide to keep it pay 
only S3. 00 a month until S44.90 
(term price) ic paid Limited 
offer — act at once 



, INTERNATIONAL TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

| 231 West Monroe St., Chicago, III., Dept. 1203 

I heiiu Underwood No. p <F. O. B. Cnicago) at once lor 10-daya 



(F. O. B. Cft 

If I am not perfectly aatisfied I can return 

IltxU If I keep it I will pay S3.00 u month until I ha 
(term price; m full. 



I Name. , 
Address. 



L— — — 

82 



Mrs. Lanny Ross Answers 
All of Your Questions 

(Continued from page 9) 

two people can be happy when practi- 
cally all of their time must be devoted 
to business, remember what Olive White 
Ross says about that: "A writer or an 
artist never really leaves his work. It is 
on his mind from morning until night. 
So it is with the singer and actor. Be- 
sides, business matters can be brought 
into the home because there is always 
some interesting personal problem in- 
volved — exciting because it's really play 
and fun." 

And to guard against too much concen- 
tration on business, there is still a sep- 
arate office elsewhere in the city for both 
star and manager with a competent secre- 
tary for each of them. The apartment 
contains Lanny's attractive studio_ where 
he can work on his singing or his song 
writing (he's just sold "Day Dreams" to 
Harms, Inc.) and where he can turn busi- 
ness conferences into pleasant social 
functions! 

REMEMBER that Lanny, who doesn't 
smoke, and drinks only an occa- 
sional cocktail, cannot go into crowded, 
smoky cafes — for smoke invariably gives 
him colds. So even though Olive is much 
more social in her tastes than Lanny, they 
effect a happy compromise by visiting 
friends at Montauk Point where they go 
fishing and enjoy life in the house-party 
manner. Sometimes during the week they 
give little parties at one of the bagatelle 
(the marble game) "palaces" which New 
Yorkers find so amusing. At the last 
counting Lanny had run up 11,000 points 
on his favorite machine — and when he 
reaches 15,000 the management has prom- 
ised him, instead of one of the routine 
prizes, the machine itself. Then Lanny 
pians to set it up in his own play room 
on the second floor of the new apart- 
ment! 

As for their future plans — well, Olive 
would not be human if she did not wish to 
raise a family — and 1 know she does. At 
the moment Lanny doesn't think about 
it — certainly he doesn't wish to talk about 
it — but I know that one day, when their 
lives have been enriched and fulfilled in 
every other way, they'll want to complete 
them in this way, too. 

. Which brings us back to the part of 
their lives which interests Olive most and 
which she herself expressed this way:"My 
most sincere hope is that all the fans will 
continue to admire Lanny for his beau- 
tiful singing, personal charm and excellent 
work in pictures, the theater and radio." 

And my wish is that with this pleasant 
glimpse behind the scenes of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lanny Ross's life, they will be left in 
peace to work out their careers which 
have one common end: the unqualified 
success of Lanny Ross. 
Sincerely, 

— Ernest V. Heyn. 



Mary Lou Has Left the 


Show Boat! 




What Has Become of 


Her? 


In the January issue of 


RADIO 


MIRROR the real reason 


you no 


longer hear this famous 


star on 


Thursdays will be reveal 


3d. 



Did Gray Hair 

Rob Them of $95 a Week? 




NowCombAwayGrayThisEasyWay 

GRAY hair is risky. It screams :"You 
are getting: old!" To end gray hair 
handicaps all you now have to do is 
comb it once a day for several days with 
a few drops of Kolor-Bak sprinkled on 
your comb, and afterwards regularly once 
or twice a week to keep your hair look- 
ing nice. Kolor-Bak is a solution for ar- 
tificially coloring gray hair that imparta 
color and charm and abolishes gray hair 
worries. Grayness disappears within a 
week or two and users report the change 
is so gradual and so perfect that their 
friends forget they ever had a gray hair 
and no one knew they did a thing to it. 

Make This Trial Test 

"Will you test Kolor-Bak without risk- 
ing a single cent? Then, go to your drug 
or department store today and get a 
bottle of Kolor-Bak. Test it under our 
guarantee that it must make you look 
10 years younger and far more attrac- 
tive or we will pay back your money. 

■ FRFC Buy a bottle of KOLOR-BAK I 
1 ■"-»• today and send top flap of car- I 

■ ton to United Remedies, Dept. 4412, I 

■ 544 So. Wells Street, Chicago — and | 
I receive FREE AND POSTPAID a 50c | 

■ box of KTJBAK Shampoo. I 

Learn to Dance 

Yon can learn all the modern dances — the latest 
Tango steps, the new Fox Trots, dreamy Waltzes, 
smart Collegiate Steps, and popular Society Stepi 
at home, easily and quickly. New chart method "* 
makes dancing' as simple as A-B-C. No music 
or partner required. Don't be a wallflower. 
Learn to dance. Complete course— 26R pases, 
54 illustrations, sent on 6 Days' Free Trial. 
Equals $20 00 Course. Send no money. Pay 
postman only SI 98. plus postage upon arrival. 
Money back if not delighted. Catalog: Free. 

Franklin Pub. Co.. 800 No. Clark St.. Dept. C-547. Chicago 



orners 




The real thing for mounting Snapshots, Cards, 
Stamps, etc No paste needed. Neat, - 
easy to use for mounting prints tight or 
loose. Sold at photo supply and album 
counters or send 10J; today for pkg. 
of 100 and free samples. 
Engel Art Corners Co., Chicago, 111., 
Address Dept 60 Z, - 4717 North. Clark 5L 





\PWI IIP ilSgi Ml Hf «y 



SALARY 
TO START 

$90to 
$175 

MONTHLY 



MEN.. 
WOMEN 

Affc Ran?e 

ia+oSo 



tiy. Mati Clerk ( ) POSTMASTER 

) P. O Laborer ( ) Seamstress 

) R. F. D. Carrier ( ) Auditor 
i ) Special Agent ( ) Stenographer 

( ) Customs Inspector ( ) U.S.BorderPatrol 
I ) City Mai! Carrier ( ) Telephone Opr. 

) P. O. Clerk < ) Watchman 

I ) Matron ( ) Meat Inspector 

i ) Special Investiga tor ( )Secret Service Opr. 
[ ) Typist ( ) Pile Clerk 

INSTRUCTION LUREAU, 0e P ;. 315-A, SI. Louis, Mo. 

Send me FREE particulars "How to Qualify for 
Government Positions" marked "X". Salaries, 
ocationa. opportunities, etc. ALL SENT FREE. 



Name. 
\ddrce< 



TRY J 
THESEJ 



Test'these three exotic lipstick shades 
at our expense ... no need for costly 
experiments to find your most flatter- 
ing shade. Send 10c In stamps to cover 
mailing costs for three full trial sizes 
i of TEM PT LI PSTICK, each in a vibrant 

new shade. . . . FRE E offer good for 
> limited time only. 

TEMPT PRODUCTS LAB. 

Depart moot 54 

.116 W. HtbSt. New "fori 




RADIO MIRROR 



Coast-to-Coasf Highlights 

(Continued from page 47) 

Mel Williamson's voice is being raised 
from most Los Angeles stations these 
days for the Federal I lousing Adminis- 
tration . . . One-time aviator, University 
of Texas graduate, lots of local announc- 
ing and program experience. 

* * * 

Fenton Farnshaw, a last summer's grad 
from the University of California at Los 
Angeles and a colonel in its R. (). T. C, 
has joined his father's radio production 
firm as assistant stage director. His 
father, Harry, created and wrote the 
Chandu series which, by the way, has 
just started all over again on KRKD. Los 

Angeles. 

* * * 

Russ Johnston. Los Angeles radio 
writer, has bought twelve acres at the 
base of Palomar Mountain . . . built a 
rustic shack and lives there with his wife 
except for commuting twice a week to 

Los Angeles. 

* * * 

Johnny Murray is back on the air 
again, KFWB, after a year's absence. 
Once a trumpet player, long-time a pop- 
ular Hollywood emcee, he held a record 
on the hi-jinks weekly frolic until it went 
off the air. Now he has a brand new 
series with one of those talent hunt 
angles. 



The Mad, Mad March of 
Time 

(Continued from page 10) 

it in the scripts which they're working on. 

The rooms which are the delivery ward 
five times a week for a new fifteen min- 
utes on the air are as barren of com- 
fortable furnishings as the editorial offices 
of a struggling weekly newspaper. 

The windows are devoid of curtains. 
the walls are broken by holes where wires 
have been jerked to make room for more 
telephones. The only chairs are the swivel 
type in front of the desks. A visitor 
stands up. Bill Geer's office is the same, 
with the exception of one battered arm 
chair that is pushed out of the way in a 
corner. 

When Geer looks up from his desk, he 
is holding a paper. Pointing to a front 
page story, he grins and says: 

"We had that whole thing on the air 
last night. Fifty per cent of the time we 
scoop the papers that way." 

That is your first intimate glimpse of 
how fast a pace these producers set for 
their program and it brings up a ques- 
tion: If the scripts are being prepared 
this early in the morning, how will they 
make room for a story that breaks late 
in the afternoon? 

"Two ways," Geer answers. "First, the 
script men know that there's a good 
chance that by five o'clock, we'll have 
thrown out the particular story they've 
worked on to make room for another, 
better one. 

"Then, certain stories — for instance the 
Italo-Ethiopian situation — are built up 
carefully and the ending left off until 
dinner time. If nothing new has de- 
veloped by that time we finish up with 
what we already have learned. But if war 
has been declared or something else has 
happened that is of momentous impor- 
tance, we tag that on." 

Talking to this man you get the feeling 
that no eventuality will be too great for 
the staff to cope with. When you have 



A HANDSOME SUM IN CASH 
KOR YOUR TRUE STORY 

How would you like to receive a handsome sum in cash in return 
for a true account of a stirring episode in your life? 

Macfadden Publications Inc. are always in the market for good 
true stories and are willing to pay royally for them. Each year, by 
means of contests and straight purchase we pay many thousands of 
dollars to men and women who never before have written for 
publication. 

If you have lived a story of dramatic quality the chances are that 
you can realize a very substantial sum of money on it, perhaps as 
much as $2500. Certainly it will be worth your while to investigate. 

On behalf of the many persons who submit their life experiences 
in story form to Macfadden Publications Inc. we have printed a 
manual describing the technique which according to our experience 
is best suited to the writing of true stories. Entitled "What You 
Should Know About Writing True Stories," it easily may be your 
introduction to a new source of substantial revenue. By all means 
write for your copy today. Simply clip, sign and mail the attached 
coupon and the booklet will be sent by return mail. 

MACFADDEN PUBLICATIONS, INC. - 1926 BROADWAY - NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Macfadden Publications, Inc. 

Dept. RM 

1926 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Please send me my free copy of your booklet entitled — "Wliat You Should Know About 
Writing True Stories". 



Name 



Street. 



City. 



.State 




Home Treatment for 
Keeping Skin Young 

Mercolized Wax — one beauty aid you can afford 
because this single preparation embodies all the 
essentials of beauty that your skin needs. It 
cleanses, softens, bleaches, lubricates and pro- 

rH tects. So simple to use, too. Just pat it on your 
^^^m skin each night as if it were an ordinary cold 
|P cream. Mercolized Wax seeps into your pores, 
^f dissolves grime, dust and all impurities. It 

mP absorbs the discolored surface skin in tiny, invis- 

ible particles, revealing the beautiful, smooth, young skin that lies 
beneath. It clears away freckles, tan, oiliness, sunburn or any other 
blemishes. You use such a tiny bit of Mercolized Wax for each appli- 
cation that it proves an inexpensive beauty investment. Beauty can not 
be taken for granted. It must be cared for regularly if you want 
to hold beauty through the years. Mercolized 
Wax brings out the hidden beauty of your 
skin. Let it make your skin more beautiful. 

Phelactine removes hairy growths — takes them out — 
easily, quickly and gently. Leaves the skin hair free. 
Phelactine is the modern, odorless facial depilatory that 
fastidious women prefer. 

Powdered Saxolite dissolved in one-half pint witch 
hazel quickly reduces wrinkles and other age signs. It is 
a refreshing, stimulating astringent lotion. Use it daily. 




83 




£^£#££S# 




~tftet£ 



YOU'RE 

WITH R 
fPACI [V 

vKU9tXT 

• • • 

P1DHEERS 111 RADIO 



TAP 



DANCING BY MAIL 

Bog. or Adv. Tap $1. Sample Tap IcBson 
for Beg. with Standard Time-Btep & 
break 25c. Beg. Waltz & Foxtrot 51. 
HAL LEROY studied hero. Send for 
Ml "\V". 
KIN5ELLA ACADEMY, 2544 May St.. Cincinnati, Ohio 

cJlieuShidlGuMhi 
Do It. &ut Halite 



ny, 1935 OFFER 

^WEARAWATCH 
OR DIAMOND 



30/to^FREE/ 

ihen Make Your Own Terms 




My confidence in YOU, mj 
confidence in my standard, de- 
pendable watches and beautiful 
genuine diamonds, and my con- 
fidence in business conditions 
cause me to make this unheard 
of offer. I am going to place 
as many watches and diamonds 
in the hands of men and women 
throughout the land as possible in 
1035 NO MATTER WHAT THE 
SACRIFICE, because each watch and 
diamond will act as a salesman to s ll 



Direct-to-You, Rock Bottom 
Prices on Nationally Advertised 
Watches, Diamond Rint 
and Silverware 



an offer! Naliona 

scd watches, diamorH 
Iverware offered at 1< 
est direot-lo-you prices. Fo: 
nearly a half century we 
have wold highest quality 
jewelry all over the world 
And now thi- remarkable offer 

Send for Beautiful 
FREE CATALOG 

Write now— bnlore thiH offer in with- 
drawn ,,,.) sol the beautiful FREE 
( italofi .Select the watch or diamond 
you want, wear it. examine it. and 

then write u» the terms you desire 

SANTA F£ WATCH CO. 

C-97 Ihomas Bldt;. Topcka. Kan 

We Buy Old Gold 




RADIO MIRROR 

been given a description of the complete 
production set up, you're positive no sit- 
uation can get out of hand. 

Bill Geer is the news editor, an all im- 
portant job. But there are other per- 
sonalities behind the scenes that help 
wield the day's stories into a night's radio 
show. There is Arthur Pryor, Jr., who 
has been associated with the March of 
Time since its debut on the CBS network. 
As general production manager, he is 
responsible for the tying together of the 
scripts, the music, and the acting. 

At his side is Howard Barlow, well 
known musical director, who has just fin- 
ished his summer's work on NBC's State 
Fair with Lanny Ross. At five o'clock 
every afternoon, Barlow and Pryor go 
over the scripts, discuss the possibilities, 
and Barlow goes off to dig out the inci- 
dental music that will best suit the moods 
of the evening's program. 

At five o'clock, if nothing has happened 
to upset the schedule, Pryor assembles 
the cast of actors, hands out the parts, 
and they hold an undress rehearsal with- 
out the orchestra. 

In the meantime, back down on the fif- 
teenth floor, the teletypewriter continues 
to clack out a digest of the day's news. 
While Pryor, his assistants, and Barlow 
work to unite the scripts they already 
have, more stories are breaking that must 
be incorporated. 

Geer, waiting until the last minute, 
rushes up to the studio and calls a con- 
ference. He may have one, two, or three 
big stories that the others know nothing 
about. They have half an hour to decide 
which of the scripts they've already spent 
two hours on should be thrown away. 

WHEN that is decided, Geer hurries 
back downstairs, calls the script men 
(the same who started at 8:30 in the 
morning) into his office, and gives out the 
latest stories. In an hour they must be 
written, checked by Geer himself, copied 
on stencils and run off on a mimeograph 
machine. After that, they are laid out on 
a long flat table, sorted, and clipped to- 
gether. 

The night you elect to go to these 
rooms to see for yourself, a woman in On- 
tario, Canada, has given birth to her 
tenth child and is tied for the lead in a 
race to have the most children by 1936 
and win a five hundred thousand dollar 
prize. Because this story didn't come in 
until after five, everything is an hour be- 
hind schedule. 

You go to the fifteenth floor at seven 
thirty as you've been told. The rooms 
are empty. A studio conference with 
Pryor, Barlow, and Geer hasn't ended yet. 
Until it does, nothing more can be done. 

Three quarters of an hour later,_ things 
began to happen. Geer strides in, fol- 
lowed by three script men, a secretary, 
two mimeograph girls, and two others 
to help sort and clip. 

The script men sit down at typewriters, 
light cigarettes, run their fingers through 
their hair, and begin to write. Geer pulls 
himself up to his desk, a heavy pencil in 
his hand, and begins to cut scripts to make 
room for the addition of the baby derby. 

As he finishes a page, it is rushed to a 
typist, copied, run off the mimeograph, 
and handed back to Geer. He makes pen- 
cilled corrections — corrections which must 
be made on every sheet as it comes off 
the mimeograph — and one complete script 
(four will be used tonight) is ready. 

The binder swings into action. The 
second script is five pages. These five 
pages are separated in neat stacks. The 
binder goes down the line, whisking off 
the pages. Back and forth. In five min- 
utes he has them in order and bound. 

You sit off in a corner, out of the way. 



OLD BOOKS 

MAGAZINES • LETTERS • NEWSPAPERS 

WAN' 



w TO5 )O oo.O0MH 




Old books (as late as 1927) now 
gathering dust in your attle, trunks, 
or basement, may be worth a fortune 
to you. A single book in your home 
may bring $IO-$50-$IOO or more in 
cash! We will pay hundreds and 
thousands of dollars for certain school 
books, travel books, story books, poet- 
ry, etc. One book may bring you as 
much as $5,000.00 cash. We want 
thousands of old books to sell to col- 
lectors and libraries. Investigate! Any 
book you now have may be valuable! 

SEND FOR PRICE LIST NOW 
Send 10c stamps or coin at once for 
new list describing many old books 
that bring high cash prices. You may 
bave what we want! Act now. 
AMERICAN BOOK MART. Dept. 180 
140 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, III. 




shrooms 

orshed. Exclusive new process. Bigger, better, 
quicker crops. More money for you I Enormous 
new demand. Write for Free Book. American 
Mushroom Industries, Dept. 472, Toronto, Ont. 



Inl2 Weeks hi Shops of Coyne 
' --Learn by Doing—many earn 
while learning. Free ompfoyment 
lifter emanation. You don't need nd- 

' and my "PAY TUITION AFTER GRADUATION" PLAN. 

"H. C. Lewis, Prcs., COYNE ELEC TKI^Ai. aCriuOL 

500 South Paulina Street, Dept. 95-64, CHICAGO, ILL. 

CATARRH aho SINUS 

CHART- FREE 

Guaranteed Relief or No Pay. Stop hawking— 
stuffed-up nose — bad breath — Sinus irritation— 
phlegm-filled throat. Send Post Card or letter 
for New Treatment Chart and Money-Back Offer. 
40,000 Druggists sell Hall's Catarrh Medicine. 

63rd year in business. . , Write todayl 
F.J.CHENEY & CO. Dept.2312, TOLEDO. O. 



HANDS YOU A 
LIGHTED Cigarette 

Take a beautifully enameled Case 
from your vest pocket. PreB8 a 
di.'.sj.'ic buttonl Automatically 
there is a epark — a flame. A 
LIGHTED Cigarette — your fa- 
vorite brand — is delivered to your 
SMOKE. A revolutionary inventioi 

■mi' j- I v low priced. Get n Magic Case for 15 Days* 

Trial nt our risk. AGENTS! Get facta about Bi R ProBte. MAGIC 
CASE MFRS. T 4234 Cozens Ave., Dept. W-46G0,St. Louis, Mo. 

Learn Public 
Speaking 

At home — in spare time — 20 minutes a day. 
Many overcome "stage-fright," gain self- 
confidence and increase their earning power, 
through ability to sway others by ef- 
fective speech. Write for free booklet. 
How to Work Wonders With Words. 
North American Institute. Dept. 1 389 
3601 Michigan Avenue, Chicago, III. 






Land 
me pack- 
i eells for 
only 26c. The kind of eoap uaed in every homo 
every day Up to 100% profit for you. Write for 
money-making details and facta about othei 
tional Victor Soup deals For quick action send 25c ior 
actual full eized sample. 
VICTOR SOAP CO., Dept. T R-125, DAYTON, O. 



W Tells AD 



bwTo Secure A 

Government Position 

Tells ADouc i hese and Other Positions 

RAILWAY POSTAL CLERK 
$1850 to $2700 a year 

POSTMASTER 

$1200 to $2500 a year 

POST OFFICE CLERK 

$1700 to $2100 a year 

R. F. D. MAIL CARRIER 

$1800 to $2300 a year 

FREE BOOK tells hmv x can hel P you Bet a Govern- 

" ment Job. For 8 years I was Civil Ser- 

vice Examiner — have helped thousands to pass examina- 
tions through my coaching. If citizen 18 to 50, you may 

• qualify Get ready NOW lor u. Government position. Send for free book. 
Write or mail ron[>..n TODAY. 

/\Ti<.. fAl H4KSON, Civil- Service Expert 
8612 Case Bldg., Rochester, N. Y. 

, ic j eend mo your Iree book "How to Secure a Govcrnm 




nt Position.' 



Mame . . 
Address 



84 



RADIO MIRROR 




OLD MOTHER HUBBARD 

HAS FILLED HER BARE CUPBOARD 

WITH ONIONS AND STEAKS AND CHEESES; 

HER STOMACH FEELS GRAND 

SINCE SHE KEEPS TUMS ON HAND . . . 

SHE EATS WHAT SHE DARN WELL PLEASES I 



NO ALKALIES FOR 

ACID INDIGESTION! 

A/TILLIONS have found they do not need to 
■"■l- drench their stomachs with strong, caustic 
alkalies. Physicians have said this habit often 
brings further acid indigestion. So much more 
safe and sensible to simply carry a roll of 
Turns in your pocket. Munch 3 or 4 after meals 
— or whenever troubled by heartburn, gas, 
sour stomach. Try them when you feel the 
effects of last night's party, or when you smoke 
too much. Turns contain a wonderful antacid 
which neutralizes acid in the stomach, but 
never over-alkalizes stomach or blood. Pleasant 
to eat as candy. Only 10c at any drug store. 



TUMS 



TUMS ARE 
ANTACID . . 

NOT A LAXATIVE 

FREE: 



FOR THE TUMMY 




Beautiful 5 color 1035-30 Onlendnr-Tlicrmometei 
with tho piirchnne of n I0r roll of Turns or 25c box ol 
NR .the nll-v-i-.-t.il.le lnxntive). At your druiKi«t'ii 




18 Kt. <i ■■ 

GOLD |5? 

ice our ■ %J 



Finished in 18 Kt 

WHITE 

To introdu 

Beautiful Blue White Rainbow 
Flash Stones, we will send a 
1 Kt. IMPORTED Simulated 
DIAMOND, mounted in Lovely 
18 Kt. White-Gold Finish King 
as illustrated, for this ad. and 
15c expense in coin. Address: 
National Jewelry Co., Dept 2, 
wheeling. W Va. (2 for 25c.) 



LADIES! Earn Money at Home 

with GIFT & ART Needlework Shop 



No Experience Needed -We Tell You How! 

i-nrn big weekly income right ax home — full oi epar 

time — with art needlework and gilt shop . We tell vc 

how and eupply every latest de- 

Bign stamped linens — cushions 

aprona, tabic sets, Bcarfe, dresser 

eets, infants wear. etc.. and al 

materials. Mail postcard for bir 

FREE OUTFIT and samples. 

Send no rrtonev. H. E. PIPER CO., Dept. B-910. 

Madison Road. Cincinnati, Ohio. 




SEND FOR 
BIG FREE 
OUTFIT 




THE PURE KNITTED COPPER. 

BUSH 

The big hand full of safe clean- 4^4c 
liness for pots, pans, aluminum %\J S 
ond oven glass. Burnt-in grease 
and grime off in a jiffy. No splint- 
ers, no rust. Buy one today at the 
store where you secured this 
magazine. 

NEW WICKLESS 

TURNS NIGHT 

AIR INTO BRIGHT 

HOME LIGHT 

A wonderful scientific light de- 
velopment! Revolutionizes home 
lighting! Gives you 20 times light of 
old wick lamp at fraction of cost. Ac- 
tually 300 candlepower of brilliant, 

soft, white light— yet burns 96% FREE AIR, only 

4% cheap kerosene (coal oil)! 

LIGHTS WHOLE HOUSE FOR FEW PENNIESI 

Your home all brightly lighted for hours for only a few cents! 
No chimneys to smoke, clean or break. No wicks to buy or trim! 
30-DAY TRIAL In Your Home! 

Built in beautiful modern art lamp models. 
Get descriptive folder -have yoor choice sent 
on 30-day no-risk trial. Enjoy this wonder- 
ful, new light right in your home for a 
whole month. Send at once for details I 
AKRON LAMP & MFG. COMPANY 
122 Lamp Bldg. AKRON, OHIO 




LAMP 



AGENTS! 

Fast, steady money- 
maker. Be first to 
have it in your terri- 
tory. Write today. 



As the deadline approaches — everything 
must be finished by nine thirty — you feel 
the tension increase, note that everyone is 
smoking, hear muttered curses as type- 
writer keys stick. Finally, the last staple 
binds down the last five pages. 

With one accord, everyone in the room 
wheels out the door and into the hall to 
get to an elevator to the twentieth floor. 
In the studio. Barlow, his orchestra, Pryor 
and his actors are waiting. 

Geer runs into the control room while 
the writers hand out the scripts to the ac- 
tors. At nine-thirty-five Pryor raises his 
hand, Barlow taps, and the March of 
Time theme song bursts forth. 

In exactly thirty-five minutes the re- 
hearsal is finished. For the first time since 
seven o'clock relaxation is the order of 
the day. Pryor grins through the glass 
of the control room, stretches, and speaks 
into the loudspeaker that is attached into 
the studio proper. 

"Okay, kids, that was swell. Time out 
now for a 'coke.' " 

Band men, writers, actors, engineers, 
announcers file out, trying to shake off 
the tightness of their nerves. Outside in 
the lounge, they wait the fifteen minutes 
of leisure until ten-twenty-five. 

AT ten-twenty-eight everyone is back 
■ in the studio and for everyone but 
Geer and his assistants the tension is 
worse than ever. For Geer and the men 
who group at his side, the job is over. No 
more stories to write until nine in the 
morning. Unless — and you suddenly re- 
member what he told you earlier in the 
day. 

"We have a direct wire from the tele- 
typewriter to the control room. Even 
while we're on the air, we can get news. 
If it is important, a messenger writes it 
out on paper and goes into the studio to 
give it to Harry Von Zell. We're breaking 
an iron clad rule of the CBS — no calls 
into the control booth while the broad- 
cast is going — but we'll do it if we have 
to." 

The rule is safe for one more night. No 
stories come in on the direct wire. The 
fifteen minutes are up and an exhausted 
studio of people can go home and 
stretch out in bed, safe for a few hours 
from the inexorable demands of a five- 
time-a-week dramatic digest of the news 
of the day. 

But even as they sleep, even as the 
earth turns towards another dawn, some- 
where in the blackness of night a new- 
March of Time has begun! 



NEXT MONTH 

An Exclusive 

First Interview with 

Jack Benny's Father! 

Don't miss this highly enter- 
taining feature on radio's 
famous comedian, Jack 
Benny. It's filled with amus- 
ing anecdotes never before 
told. In the January issue, 
out November 26. 





•i 



auto Radios am 
electrical appliances ir 
spare time. I have nir 
from $40 as Inch as $10' 
a month. My Radio 
work equals and often 



2i, la 



arv."— JOHN J. REID- 
ER. 5.10 Davton Ave. 
St. Paul. Minnesota 



Learn to Make 

$ 30, $ 50, $ 75 a WEEK 

sMioam you at 
norm m Apcvui ivrruL, 

Get my FREE book ahout the op- 
portunities in Radio. Mall the cou- 
pon now. Get the facts about thi3 
new, fast-growing Industry. N.B.I. 
training fits you i'i lobs making. 
selling, servicing short and long wave 
Radio sets, to have your own busi- 
ness; to build, sen-ice and Install 
loud-speaker systems ; to operate 
Radio apparatus on board ships, in 
a broadcasting or commercial land 
station; for Television, which prom- 
ises hundreds of good jobs soon, auto- 
mobile Radio, aviation, police Radio, 
and many other branches. My FREE 
bank gives full Information and tells 
how to learn quickly at home In spare 
time. Stop struggling along In a 
dull job with low pay ami no future. 
Start training now for the live-wire 
Radio field. Hundreds of men Dow in 
Radio owe their success to N.K.i. 
training. 

Many Make $5. $10. S15 a 

Week Extra in Spare Time 

While Learning 

Hold your job. I'll train you In a 
few hours of your spare time a week. 
The day yon enroll I start sending 
you Extra Monty Job Sheets w ich 
quickly show you how to do Radio 
repair jobs common in most every 
neighborhood. I give you Radio 
equipment that teaches you to build 
and service practically every type of 
receiving set made. George W. 
Honert, 24S Water Street, Llgonier, 
Ind.. made over ?"»00 from the start 
of the Course lo its completion. 

Get My Book— FREE— Now 

My book has shown hundreds of 
fellows how to make more money 
and win success. It's FREE to 
any ambitious fellow over 15 years 
of age. Investigate. Kind out what 
Radio offers; about my Course: what 
others who have taken it are doing 
and making; about my Money Rtck 
Agreement, and the many other 
N.R.I, features. Mail coupon NOW. 

J. E. SMITH, Pres. 

National Radio Institute 

Dept. 5NT 

Washington, D. C. 




akin* a Rood \\\ 
Idom have a 
ider $40. If it < 




i Radio Es- 

he lacxc*t 

store 

enrolling I have mn 
about $85U0. I want 
thank N. R. I."— J- 
HUFF 001 W. 18th I 
Austin. Texas. 




J. E. SMITH, President 
Vatlonal Radio Institute 
Dept. 5NT 
Washington, D. C. 



Dear Mr. Smith: 
Without obligating me, send 
free book about spare time 
and full time Radio opportu- 
nities, and how I can train 
.tn-m at home in spare time. (Please write plainly 

NAME AGE 



ADDRESS 

CITY STATE. 



,J 



85 



RADIO MIRROR 



JUNGLE MADNESS 
FOR CULTURED LIPS 





Here's a freshly dif- 
ferent, more alluring 
lipstick shade that brings 
to lips the sublime madness 
of a moon-kissed jungle night — 
the new Jungle shade of Savage 
Lipstick! It's a brilliant, vivid, 
brighter red — the most exotic color 
ever put into lipstick — and a truly 
adventurous hue! And is Jungle in- 
delible? So much so that its intense 
color becomes an actual part of 
you . . . clinging to your lips ... all 
day ... or, all night . . . savagely! 
There are four other Savage Lip- 
stick shades: Tangerine (Orangish) 
. . . Flame (Fiery) . . . Natural (Blood Red) 
. . . Blush (Changeable). 20c at all 10c stores. 

SAVAGE 



LIGHTEN YOUR HAIR 
WITHOUT PEROXIDE 



... to ANY Siiade you Oes.re 
. . . SAFELY in 5 to 15 minutes 

Careful, fastidious women avoid the uee of 

eeroxide because peroxide makeB hair brittle. 
echler's Instantaneous Hair Lightener 

require! NO peroxide. Used aa a paste it o Q a- 
not streak, Eliminates straw" look. Beneficial to perma- 
nent waves and bleached hair. Lightens blonde \w\r^m 

grown dark. This ia the only preparation that also lightensV4 
the scalp. No more dork roots. UBed over 20 years by famous ™ ■ 
beauties, stage and soreen stars and children. Harmless, Guar- I 
anteed. Mailed complete with brush for application I 

rnrr 36 page booklet "The Art of Lightening Hair 

* KMLCt Without Peroxide" Free with your first order . 

ERVVIN F. LECHLER, Hair Beauty Specialist 

565 W. 181st St., New York, N. Y. 



NO DIET -NO MEDICINES 
•NO EXERCISES' 

AN AMAZING invention called Roll- 
/~V ette, developedi n Rochester, Min- 
nesota, makes i t possible for you to rid 
yourself of unsightly pounds of fat 
and have a beautiful, slenderform. 
This remarkable patented device 
takes off fat quickly from any part 
of your body without strenuous 
diets, dangerous drugs, exercise. 
Leaves the flesh firm and gives a 
natural healthy glow to the skin. 
Makes you feel years younger. 

A FEW MINUTES A DAY 
ROLLS FAT AWAY 

Take off many inches from the 
spots where you want to reduce 
most. ROLLETTE is an effective, 
scientific principle for reducing 
which is receiving the approval of 
physicians everywhere. Just send 
name and address for PDPP 
Trial Offer— Today F l\Cb 
Rollette Co., 11 East Huron St. 
Dcpt. 501 Chicago, Illinois 

86 




LOSES 23 Lbs. 



" By vsino 

RoUetle I have 

lost 23 lbs. the 

first month." 

AnneReiUy, 

Milwaukee, 
Wise. 



Will War Guns Silence 
Radio? 

(Continued from page 18) 

women slinking about our comparatively 
peaceful nation, taking an uncommon in- 
terest in our affairs, our morale, the 
strength of our defenses and of our 
courage. Above all, they're interested in 
the shipment of food, clothing and fuel 
that are leaving these shores for foreign 
ports. That's the vital information they 
must uncover, must transmit to their su- 
periors in their country, or to warships of 
their nation patrolling the seas. 

How can they dispatch this danger- 
ous intelligence quickly and secretly? The 
mails? Too slow. By cable or wireless 
telegraph? Too easy for our govern- 
ment's agents to check filed messages. By 
concealed, unlicensed transmitters? Old 
stuff, too simple for the agents to locate 
them with the highly developed direction 
finders of today. 

BUT you know the answer already. 
Those spies can use our broadcasting 
stations and do it with neither you, nor 
1, nor the broadcasters suspecting a thing. 
The man who told me how it might be 
done is one of a quiet-spoken, resolute 
little army of government, military and 
naval officials who will strike, and strike 
hard, at any espionage which takes ad- 
vantage of us and of our broadcasters. 
How, then, can it be done? 

All right, let's try our hands at this 
amateur secret service radio sleuthing. 
We'll say just for instance that Italy is 
at war with Germany. Lying at a New 
York pier, is a heavily loaded Grecian 
freighter. She will clear secretly at half- 
past one in the morning for Greece, a neu- 
tral nation, with her cargo of wheat. 
Germany strongly suspects that that 
wheat will be transshipped to Italy and, 
under the circumstances, she has no in- 
tention of permitting the Italians to eat 
well, if at all. 

In other words, Germany doesn't want 
that ship to reach Greece. Somewhere 
outside the neutral waters of the United 
States, lie German warships, ready to see 
that she doesn't. But unless these war 
vessels know when she's sailing, what she 
looks like, how are they going to stop 
her? 

You are sitting in your home, listen- 
ing half-heartedly to a musical program 
being broadcast from a small New York 
station. Suddenly you lean forward alert- 
ly as a bouyant announcer spouts his ad- 
vertising message. 

". . . . Grain ite is a product used by 
five million Americans. Originated in 
Greece in the days of the Greek Olympic 
games, it is a product which is being 
bought this very night, by hundreds of 
athletes. Isn't fifteen cents, one and one- 
half dimes, a mighty small price to pay 
for your own safety? We now pre- 
sent. . . . 

All in a dither, you pull out a pencil 
and paper and go to work. 

I^MFTY miles out in the Atlantic ocean, 
a sleek, gray, German war vessel pitches 
and rolls as she restlessly patrols at half 
speed, waiting for intelligence from shore. 
In her radio room sits a hard-faced young 
officer, earphones clamped to head, eagerly 
sucking in every word of that advertis- 
ing message. 

He scribbles rapidly. Another officer 
flips through a code book. "Five million," 
he mutters. "That means five thousand 
tons . . . Grainite? . . . Ah, wheat . . . 




30-Day Trial Offer 

Writo today for Iree 
booklet. "Health, 
Strength and Perfect 
Figure" and details of 30- 
day Trial Offer. 



STOP 

SUFFERING 

FROM Abdominal Weak- 
ness, Backaches, Head- 
aches, N ervousness and 
other ills caused by bad pos- 
ture. Welcomo relief from 
such ills and discomfort has 
come to thousands after wear- 
ing the light, comfortable 
Natural Body Brace. as 
the braco 
eently helps 
return the 
vital organs 
to a more 
normal 
position. 




Comfortable, easy to wear. 
Over 300,000 satisfied users — 
MEN and WOMEN. 
The Natural Body Brace Co. 
2312 RashBldg. Salina, Kans. 



m fc NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY RE- 

■ ' GARDING GOOD JOBS IN INSTITUTIONS, 

HOSPITALS, ETC., everywhere write NOW for information enclos- 
ine etnmp to Schurf Burenu. Dept! 12-34. 145 W. 45th St.. N. Y. 

UNIONS 

J Torture. Needless 

7 Pain stops almostinstantly. The swell- 
ing and inflammation is eo quickly re- 
duced you can wear smaller, neater shoes 
with ease. Prove it on your own bunion. Just 
write and say, *'I Want To Try Pedodyne.'* No obligation. 

Pedodyne Co., 180 N. Wacker Dr., Dept. P-212, Chicago, III. 





Make money taking pictures. Prepare quickly during 
spare time. Also earn while you learn. No previous ex- 
perience necessary. New easy method. Nothing else like 
it. Send at once for free book. Opportunities in Modern 
Photography, and full particulars. 

. AMERICAN SCHOOL OF PHOTOGRAPHY 
3601 Michigan Avenue Dept, 1389 Chicago, U. S. A. 





YOUR FHCG CHA71G€D 



Straight regutai features! Charming 
new beauty! They can be yourB. Or. 
Stotter (grad. of University of Vienna) 
reconstructs facea by famous Vienna 
Polyclinic methods. Unshapely Nosee, 
Protruding Ears, Large Lips, wrinkles, 
Signe of Age, etc., are all quickly cor- 
rected. Low cost. Write or call for 
Free Booklet "Facial Reconstruc- 
ttton." (Mailed in plain wrapper.) 



Follow This Man 

Secret Service Operator No. 38 la on 
the job 1 Runnini? down Counterfeit 
Gang. Tell-tale fingerprints in mur- 
dered girl'e room. Thrill, Mystery. 
__ Tho Confidential Reports 

■>rl*A-0 of Operator No. 38 made 
* * CC to him chief. Writo for it. 
Earn a Regular Monthly Salary 
YOU can become a Finger Print Ex- 
pert at home, in spare time. Write 
for details if 17 or oyer. 

Institute of Applied Science 

1920 Sunnyside Ave. 

Dept. 79.19 Chicago, 111. 



WILL YOU WEAR THIS SUIT 



and Make up to $12 in a Day! 

I et mc send you this fine all-wool tailored Buit FREE OF 
COST, hist follow my eaay plan and show the suit to 
vour friends. Make up to $12 in a day easily. No expe 

Hence — no canvassing necessary. 

Send for Samples— FREE of COST 

Write today for FREE details, ACTUAL SAMPLES and 
MiirG-riro" monev pettine plans. Send no money. H. J. 
Collin, Progress Tailoring Co., Dept. Z-349, 500 
S. Throop St., Chicago, III. 




gbax 




w Quickly and safely you can tint those streaks of 
gray to lustrous shades of blonde, brown or black. 
BROWNATONE and a small brush does it. Used and 
approved for over twenty-four years. Guaranteed 
harmless. Active coloring agent is purely vegetable. 
Cannot affect waving of hair. Economical and lasting 
— will not wash out. Imparts rich, beautiful color 
with amazing speed. Easy to prove by applying a lit- 
tle of this famous tint to a lock of your own hair. 
BROWNATONE is only 50c— at all drug and toilet 
counters — always on a money-back guarantee. 



HEADACHES 



ENDED . . FOREVER 

Why try to stop your headache? 
Of course you want to rid your- 
self of tho pain But wait! In- 
stead, shouldn't you talk it over 
a bit with your headache? It ie 
thero for no other purpose than 
to warn you — it says, LOOK 
OUT. Somo thing has gone 
wrong. Learn to diagnose your 
headache and you at once spot 
the real source of trouble. If 
you aro not woll; if some one 
of your organs does not funo 
ion properly; if you are COn- 
atipatnd; if your ntomiich doea not properly dicont ihi- food it t:<hr ■ 
— il hi-iidii.il-- t« very likely to wave its signul to you to LOOK OU'l 

In Iuh nturtltiiK book, llc.<:idiu-hca ( Uernftrr Miwfuddcn (coon into 
tho fUDJOOt of hQiulitclicn in n inoxt thorouicri munnor Ho tclln you 
rho ciuiHon an woll as the treatment for tho different types of bead 
itaboi. 

lau need «end do money tor thin book Mwrely pny the ponimnn 
n'2.00 jjIiim poMtime. If not natinfartory return in Gdayn and your $U.(K 
vill bo refunded. The nninll Sli.tJO [iri.-e for tin* book includoH a on.- 

/ear's ■ubBoription lor Phyalcal Culture Maguine. This price applie* 
to the United States only 

Macfadden Book Company, Dept. R. M. 12 

1926 Broadway New York City 




WttX HAIR 

Women, girls, men wltn gray. fadea, streaked Dair Shan- poo 
and color your hair at the same time with new Frencn 
discovery "SHAMPO-KOLOR," takes tew minutes, leaves 
hair soft, glossy, natural. Permits permanent wave and curl. 
Free BooKlel, Monsieur L. r. Valligny. Dept. 1 8, 254 W.31 St., New York 

You < an- DANCE IN 

THREE HOURS— Now 

Just throe hours practice, at Home without music or part- 
ner. It's a new and simplified course in ballroom dancinc, 
written by C. F. Appelbaum, dance instructor at the St. 
Louis Y for 4 years. It's a full course 24 lessons for $1.00. 
Send stamps cash or money order. Money refunded If not 
entirely satisfied. 

LEARN TO DANCE IN THREE HOURS 
CARL F. APPELBAUM, 1120 So. Cheyenne. Tulsa, Okla. 



VOICE 



100% Improvement Guaranteed 

| We build, strengthen the vocal organs — 

ot with singing Xeaaons— but by fundamentally 

. oundand BCientifically correct nilent exercwee.. 

I and absolutely guarantee to improve any sinking 

or speakiog voice at least 100% . - . Write for 

wonderful voice book— sent free, bat enclose 8c 

for part postage. Learn WHY you can now have 

the voice you want. No literature eent to any- 

j one onder 17 unless signed by parent 

PtfiFLCl VOICL INSTITUTE, Studio 79-19 

64 E. Lake St.. Chicago 



CLEANS CLOTHES 

New W 'ay. ..Sells On Sight 

NEW DRY-CLEANING CLOTHES BRUSH. 
Revolutionary Invention. Banishes old-style 
clothes brushes forever. Never anything like it! 
Secret chemical plus unique vacuum action. 
Keeps clothing splc-and-span. Also cleans hats, 
drapes, window shades, upholstered furniture, 
etc. Saves cleaning bills. Low priced. 
AGENTS WANTED. Hustlers making 
phenomenal profits. 

SAM PI F flFFFR Samples Bent at our 
»" mrLt Urrtll ri8k to first person 
in each locality who writes. No obl!- 
Kation. Get details. Be first. Send in vour 
name TOD A Y! 
KRISTEE MFG. CO.. 442 Bar St. Akron. O 

*2 491 




f rheumatisn 
back, sciatici 

dry, penetrat- 
home 




Let me tell You how I Got Rid of 

Pimples 

AFTER SUFFERINGS IS YEARS 



, I know what it is to suffer the_ 
s embarrassment of unsightly skin 
caused by pimples. I, too, know 
that for years I tried nearly every- 
thing to get rid of them. I now know the joy of a 
clear skin brought about by an easy-to-use home 
treatment. 

A POSTCARD BRINGS THIS BOOK 

Tells in plain language how this wonder 
treatment was discovered and how it FgkFF 
works. Simple to apply. The first appli- fKtt 
cation usually stops the pain and itching. 
Send your name and address for complete 
information. Do this today. Address 

EC GIUCIIC 2508 Southwest Blvd. 
■ O.UIVlHO Kansas City, Mo. 



RADIO MIRROR 



Greece . . . Greek . . . This very night . . . 
One and one half dimes . . . Half past 
one. Get this to the commander imme- 
diately. Five thousand tons wheat on 
Greek ship clearing New York tonight 
1 :30 for Greece." 

A moment later, the destroyer heels 
down hard as she swings about in a sharp 
turn and bites into the heavy seas on a 
fast run northward to head off the Greek 
freighter. 

When you snatched up your pencil and 
paper, you knew there was something 
wrong with that advertising talk. You 
were right. There was enough wrong to 
have started off a chain of events which 
might well have meant the vengeful en- 
try of another nation into the war. 

But how was that message permitted to 
get on the air in the first place? Very 
simple. A manufacturer can always buy 
time on an independent broadcasting sta- 
tion. It wouldn't be very hard for a for- 
eign nation to assign spies to purchase 
and conduct in an outwardly respectable 
manner a manufacturing business solely 
for the purpose of being able to buy ad- 
vertising time on our air and using it to 
transmit espionage intelligence. 

SUCH messages won't be easy to de- 
tect; won't, obviously, be as crude as 
the example 1 gave. One officer of the In- 
telligence Department of the Army sug- 
gested to me that it was not at all unlikely 
that musical codes would be used by 
foreign agents. 

If you're musically inclined, you might 
amuse yourself playing about with the 
vast possibilities there. In an original 
composition, written expressly to trans- 
mit a specific message, each note of the 
melody could correspond to a letter of the 
alphabet. In a familiar composition, cer- 
tain chords could represent code words 
previously agreed upon. Drums might rap 
out messages in Morse code, saxophones 
slip in signals now and again in the In- 
ternational wireless code. But just be- 
cause I pass these possibilities on to you, 
please don't suspect the first foreign mu- 
sician you meet. 

No matter how it were done, if our in- 
telligence officers spotted any such secret 
transmission of messages through our 
broadcasting stations, even though we 
were neutrals, they'd clamp down on these 
offenders against our peace and security 
with a fast-moving, if heavy, hand. 

The chances are remote that any broad- 
casting station itself would be in any way 
responsible. Yet if spies were to persist 
in using our air facilities, the govern- 
ment could and would take over control 
of broadcasting under the powerful na- 
tional emergency law. 

THAT'S the law which could make your 
radio so silent you'd walk on tiptoe 
every time you went into the same room. 

You see now that spy activities consti- 
tute a threat to your listening freedom. 
You also realize that broadcasts from the 
war front could be so crammed with 
propaganda as to imperil our peace and 
neutrality chat strict curtailment of broad- 
casting could be necessary. 

It is important that you know how 
such propagandizing by radio could de- 
velop to dangerous proportions. You 
should know that there are other men- 
aces which roaring war guns hold for 
your listening. Unless you know them, 
you cannot be prepared for the drastic 
steps the government is ready to take in 
war emergencies. These, then, are the 
things which I shall reveal to you in the 
January issue of Radio Mirror out No- 
vember 26. 




CUSTOm BUILT 

PvOYALf 

24- TUBS ^ccMcr 

THIS super radio-musical instrument was created 
for tkose discriminating and exacting few who 
insist on tke finest, most beautiful, most precisely built 
radio obtainable. A set of rare distinction, musically 
and artistically perfect, tke Royale offers over 100 
features . assuring a luxurious and idealized type ot 
brilliant, sparkling, guaranteed world-wide perform ance 
...heretofore unattainable. It is today's only "aged 
radio. .. offers 6tuning ranges. ..4Hto 2400 meters. ..etc. 

This 24 - tube achievement out- 
performs otker receivers. Assures 
Unlimited Scope Full Fidelity 
Audio range as 20 to 16.000 cycles 
per second . . . 40 warts undistorted 
output. Fully guaranteed for 5 years 
. absolute satisfaction assured 

Tke 30-day FREE Trial Offer en- 
ables you to try tke Ro-yale in your 

own Iiome, wi ill out 
obligation. Write for 
literature now or mail 

TODAY 



J^^^gL, literatur 
pP^) coupon 




H? ROTALC PAII€ CCAFTEC/ 

(Division Aladwest Radio Corporation) 

Dept. 207 F. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Wrtbout obligation, send me literature deicnbin; 
Custom-BuUt 24-Tube 6-Tuning Range, Royal. 
Radio . . . and details of your 30-day Free Trial Plan 



A 



Name 

Street. 

Town 



State.. 




, Weak alftaM. (fori ox fiinaj 

{ Send For Free 1936 Catalog O 

PINS tundxmxly river pLird. en.mcfed I or 2 colon. 

*nv3<*4 letteri and rtu Doz. Pr*e S3 -SO. Stettin* 
ir Cold PUle SOc Deo. IS RINGS, Sterimf 
iirrer, iimil»rlv l'.» priced L»t-*» m»Ler* 
or 40 v>i Over 300 dofnL Write today! 

BASTIAN BROS. CO. ^ 



For 15 Years, the Choice of Fastidious Women 

GOLDEN GLINT 

I the SHAMPOO 

v with the tiny tint RINSE 

Brightens Every Shade of Hair 



87 



RADIO MIRROR 



stop COUGHS 

quicker by "Moist- 
Throat' Method 



Getting throat's 
moisture glands 
to work "soothes" 
coughs away 



THE usual cause 
of a cough is the 
drying or clogging of 
moisture glands in 
your throatand wind- 
pipe. When this hap- 
pens, heavy phlegm 
collects, irritates. Then you cough. 




The 



quick and safe way to relief is by letting 
Pertussin stimulate those glands to pour out 
their natural moisture. Sticky phlegm loos- 
ens, is easily raised. You have relief! 

Get after that cough today — with Pertus- 
sin. Over 1,000,000 doctors' prescriptions for 
Pertussin were filled in one year, according 
to Prescription Ingredient Survey issued by 
American Pharmaceutical Assn. 




PERTUSSIN 

■MOIST-THROAT" METHOD OF 

COUGH RELIEF 



Seeck& Kade, Inc., 440 Washington St., N. Y. C. 
I want a Free trial bottle of Pertussin — quick! 



Name. 



NOfiW&iME 



No more sticky lotions for 
me. My hands quit chapping 
when I changed to — 
HESS WITCH HAZEL CREAM 

—the no-jyum lotion. He3s is never 
sticky. It keeps skin free of chap 
all winter long. Heals and soothes 
roiiKh, soro. red shin like magic. 
Try it. Sold in all 10c stores. (67) 

E. E. HESS CO., Brook, Ind. 




FREE INSTRUCTIONS 
SHOW HOW TO MAKE THESE 



clever ' 
novelties 



FREE instructions show you 
how tomakethese charm- 
ing novelties. Gifts that 
■ you can make and give 
JSk yourfriendsthisChrist- 
^7M masiMakethemoutof 
^yCX. ''^f^U^-z-, clothes-pins, empty 
S /.",;, cereal boxes, old 
h ',' ■ i . ':■ phonograph rec- 
/»/•■-<* '"■'=,■ ^{^r ords.andotherodds 
' -ksiisK — ^and ends, and a small 
amount of Dennison'8 
gay, colorful crepe paper. 
We show you how FREE. 
It's as simple as ABC and 
loads of fan besides. Send 
the coupon 




• DENNISON'S 

• Dupt. M-145, Framintfham, Mass. 
I Please send FREE the instrnctio 
, for mafciDK fivo clever novelties. 

I Name 

' Street (.orR.F.D.) 

■ City _ ...State 

■ Why not let us Include some of these other Dunniaon 
I Book; '! Chifk thone you want and enclose 10c for each. 

Fun for All : forty Games. Slums and Decorations 
I J93S hook of New Dennison Crafls.. Crepe Paper Flowers 
New Crepe Paper Costume Booh... The Cellophane Crafl Book 



Kicked Upstairs! 

(Continued from page 25) 

of the little Philadelphia station that it 
became a regular weekly feature, and the 
amusing adventures of "Sir Percival 
Postlethwaite," a comic-strip type of 
Briton, became the talk of Philadelphia. 

Letters poured in to the station in ever 
increasing volume, to such an extent, in 
fact, that the enterprising manager of the 
station, sensing that such a "find" would 
not long be content to work merely for 
the fun of it, and without any salary, 
offered Carter a regular job on the an- 
nouncing staff. The salary was higher 
than that of the newspaper job, and 
even though it hadn't been, the micro- 
phone microbe's bite had taken effect. 
The lure of the studio had become 
stronger even than that of printer's ink, 
and Carter seized the opportunity eagerly. 

Two weeks later a representative of the 
radio station waited shame-facedly for an 
uncomfortable audience with the manag- 
ing editor of the tabloid newspaper. Ad- 
mitted to the presence, he stammered in 
his embarrassment. "Say, listen," he 
blurted at length, "can you take this guy 
Carter back? He's a swell guy personally, 
and we like his work, but somehow, he 
doesn't seem to go over with sponsors. 
They don't like his British accent." 

Inasmuch as Carter, like most good 
newspapermen, had been earning about 
twice what he was being paid on the 
paper, the managing editor had no hesi- 
tation in restoring his job, and Carter 
came back once more to the clackety- 
clack of typewriters, the strident caco- 
phony of linotype machines, and the roar 
from below of batteries of presses. 

SIX months later, as a circulation pro- 
motion stunt, Carter's newspaper 
made an arrangement with radio station 
WCAU, Columbia's outlet in Philadel- 
phia, and a newsreel, for a daily news 
broadcast. Carter was assigned to the 
task of preparing and broadcasting the 
material. In less than two weeks, his 
daily broadcast had attracted such wide- 
spread attention that three sponsors were 
bidding for his services, and in a month 
he had become more of a Philadelphia 
institution than the newspaper for which 
he worked. During the two years that 
followed, Carter's news broadcast became 
the Quaker City's most popular and 
widely talked of air feature, although it 
was not until 1932, when the Lindbergh 
baby was kidnaped, that the rest of the 
nation's listeners-in came to know his 
clipped tones and terse emphasis. 

From the little village of Hopewell, 
Carter broadcast the details of the kid- 
naping and the subsequent activities of 
the hunt for the kidnapers, and more than 
fifteen thousand letters attested to the 
widespread attention his words com- 
manded. 

One day, during the Hopewell siege, the 
time for Carter's broadcast arrived to find 
him totally unprepared. Some informa- 
tion he had been expecting, and upon 
which he had counted for material, had 
failed to reach him. Resourcefully, he 
clipped from that day's edition of his 
newspaper an editorial concerning the kid- 
naping, stepped before the mike, and read 
the article in its entirety, spacing it out 
so that it just filled in the time allotted. 

So forceful was his delivery, so much 
fire did he manage to inject into the cold 
type of the editorial, that letters by the 
hundreds deluged the newspaper office and 
that of the broadcasting company. The 
editor of the paper heard of the tremen- 
dous response to Carter's broadcast. 

"Have Carter send a copy of that 




Protect Your Home 
from Tuberculosis 

Buy 
Christmas Seals 



LITTLE BLUE BOOKS 



bend postcard for our free catalogue. Thou- 
sands of bargains. Address: LITTLE BLUE 
BOOK CO., Catalogue Dept., Desk 468, 
Girard, Kansas. 



■ 



CTSfl2MSgcl 

CLASS PINS— any letters, any year, any colors. Silver plated. 
1 to II, 40e ea; gold plated, S0# ea; sterling, 60* e*. Silver plated. ^ 
12 or more, 35* ea; gold plated*. 45* ea; sterling, 65* ea. Sterling silver 
rings as shown. 1 to 11, 11.90 ea; 12 or more, 91.65 ca. Write for Big FREE I 
' Catalog showing hundreds of pins, rings, medals, emblems, trophies, etc. 



,! METAL ARTS CO. k.. FACTORY*!! ROCHESTER.N.Y 



H£JT_T£ 



ERUPTI ONS 



PSORIASIS, ECZEMA, ITCH, ACNE, RINGWORM 

Distresses from these disorders now QUICKLY relieved with 
PSORACINE, a remarkable preparation used by thousands. 
Many wonderful reports from everywhere. FREE IN- 
FORMATION ON SKIN DISORDERS. WRITE 
ILLINOIS MEDICAL PRODUCTS. 208 N. WeHs, D-62. Chicago. 



Denison s 4&&&0& 



BT 57 Years of Mrs \ *"> 






We supply all entertainment ^^. -jQP 

needs for dramatic clubs, Xdajv .X — ^ — v 

schools, lodges, etc., and for V 1 '^^'^ rr&S 

every occasion. 

T. s. Penl.on & Co. . 623 S. W»b„h, P— 1. it Chicago 



rranr 



WITHOUT 
SEWING 




SEWNOMORE 

PaysUpTo&es&Hour 




.SEW-NO-MORE— amazing- new , 

Srodact.mends ripa, tears, holes 
lany fabric— instantly— neatly — 
[ ynthoutneedlsor thread. MENDS DON'T SHOW! 
► Better than darning or sewing-. Patterns matched 
...pa perfectly. Takes only a minute. Can be washed, 

p *,*"' -j i^_- b ,°! ,e B* lroned - Saves eyes clotheB, time, money, 
■Popular priced. Qmckly demonstrated. Pays 217% profits 
FRJE SAMPLE- Write for FREE Sample to prov© claims. FREE 
outfit and territory offer. 

SEW.WQ.WORE CO. otfyT -^j%HArTSlSS HRO - 

Old Faces Made Young! 

Men as Well as Women Can 
Now Look Young. 

A famous French beauty specialist recently as- 
tonished New York society by demonstrating that 
wrinkles, scrawny neck, "crow's feet", double chin 
and other marks of age are 
easily banished by spending 
only 6 minutes a day in 
your own home by an easy 
method of facial rejuvena- 
tion that any one can do. 

No cosmetics, no massage, 
no beauty parlor aids. 

The method is fully ex- 
plained with photographs in 
a thrilling book sent free up- 
on request in plain wrapper. 
Pauline Palmer, 1032 Armour Blvd., Kansas City.Mo. 
Write before supply is exhausted. 

Name 

City., 




. State.. 



RADIO MIRROR 



WAKE UP YOUR 
LIVER BILE- 

WITHOUT CALOMEL 

And You'll Jump out of Bed in 
the Morning Rarin' to Go 

THE liver should pour out two pounds of 
liquid bile into your bowels daily. If this 
bile is not flowing freely, your food doesn't 
digest. It just decays in the bowels. Gas bloats 
up your stomach. You get constipated. Your 
whole system is poisoned and you feel sour, 
sunk and the world looks punk. 

A mere bowel movement doesn't get at the 
cause. It takes those good, old Carter's Little 
Liver Pills to get these two pounds of bile 
flowing freely and make you feel "up and up". 
Harmless, gentle, yet amazing in making bile 
flow freely. Ask for Carter's Little Liver Pills 
by name. Stubbornly refuse anything else. 
25c at all drug stores. ©i93i,c. m.co. 

Old Leg Trouble 

Heals at Home While Working 

Viscose Method heals many old leg sores 
caused by leg congestion, varicose veins, 
swollen legs and injuries or no cost for 
TRIAL. Describe trouble and get FREE 
BOOK. Dr R. G Clason Viscose Co., 
140 N Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

MYSTIC S\ AKi; 

Reminiscent of Sacred Oriental Ser- 
pent eet with marvelous. y hued Sun 
Stone, symbol of the Sun's mysteri- 
ous power for health and happiness 
Gold acid teat ring. Attracts, com- 
pels, mystiSes. Pay postman $1.98 
and shipping charges, or make re- 
mittance with order and we pay 
shipping charges. Guaranteed, 

Oriental Lucky Coin FREE. 

FRENCH ROY, Box Ul.Varick Sta^DepL 151, New York, N.Y. 

PAYS AGENTS UP TO $8 IN A DAY 

Dispel Bathroom Odors easy, inexpensive way. Puro 
Bowl-Itizer overcomes odors and replaces them with 
flower-like fragrance. Banna out of eight, inside 
Toilet. Guaranteed as advertised in Good House- 
keeping Magazine. 

Every home needs Bowl-Itizer ... one of 12 faut- 
solling borne necessities. Make sensational daily 
profits. Write today for details and Full Size Sample 
FREE. 







Get Rid 

— of — 



PIMPLES 



Acne, Blackheads, Oily Skin, etc. 

Write for Great News about New Home 
_ Treatment for clearing skin of unsightly 
Pimples, Acne, Blackheads, Enlarged Pores,. Oily Skin 
and other blemishes. Discovery of Famous Skin Specialist 
used privately for years with marvelous success. SENT 
ON TRIAL You Risk Nothing. 

rnrr Send for Free Booklet At Once. Don't suffer. 
■ ""tt embarrassment any longer WRITE TODAY. 

Seboline tVi. Co., Box 2408, Kansas City, Mo. 

No_ Joke To Be Deaf 

—Every deaf person knows that— 

Mr. Way made himself hear his watch tick after 

oeing deaf for twenty-five years, with his Arli- 
. ficiat Gar Drums. He wore them day and night. 
■.-Tney stopped his bead 

noises. They are invisible 
I and comfortable, no wires 

or batteries. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money back. 

Write for TRUE STORY. 

Also booklet on Deafness. Artificial Ear Drum 
THE WAY COMPANY 

7 lv Hofmann Bide. Detroit, Michigan 




RMRZING/5ILK1H05E 

GUARANTEED TO G 
TVearTUithout Holes I 



R NEW HOSE 

REE ^ 



Beautiful Bilk Hose guaranteed to wear 
without holes up to 8 months or re- j 
placed free. "Antl"-Snag, Spot-proof, 
Ringless. Sheer chiffons and serv- 
ice weights. 68 styles, colors for 
men, women, children. Sold 
only by representatives 
direct to users. Big 
money for agents. 



YOUR OWN 
HOSE FREE 




agents: 

IN A 

fO^WEEK 

Write for special 

full or part time plan. 

Give hose size. 

WILKNIT HOSIERY CO. 

P-8 Midway. Greenfield, O. 



broadcast immediately, and print it on 
page one," he ordered. His rotund face 
was red when he learned that the broad- 
cast which had attracted such widespread 
attention was no more than a verbatim 
repetition of his own newspaper's edi- 
torial, which had attracted no more than 
ordinary comment when printed. 

An insistent radio audience demanded 
Carter after its appetite had been whetted 
by his masterful handling of the Lind- 
bergh case and, shortly after his return 
from Hopewell, he was signed by his pres- 
ent sponsor — for whom he is entering his 
fourth year, with a growing popularity. 

With a flair for showmanship, Carter 
dropped the prosaic given name "Harold," 
adopting for broadcasting purposes the 
more picturesque "Boake," and borrowed of 
a great-grandfather, Francis Boake Car- 
ter, of Shanganah Castle, Dublin. Thus, 
in the event that you visit an art gallery 
and note a portrait prominently displayed 
bearing the signature "H. T. H. Carter" 
you will know that "H. T. H." and 
"Boake" are one and the same, for when 
he could snatch time from his newspaper 
work, before he first came to the micro- 
phone, Carter was an accomplished por- 
trait painter, with such a favorable 
reputation in his adopted city of Phila- 
delphia that more than a hundred of his 
works, at one time or another, were ex- 
hibited there. 

EVEN more than his forceful delivery, 
a checkered career crowded almost un- 
believably into his brief thirty-five years 
gives him a background for his interpreta- 
tive news broadcasts. Born in Baku, 
Russia, where his father was British con- 
sul, Carter spent his boyhood in that 
country. The four schools from which 
he was unceremoniously ousted, by his 
own admission for "backwardness, inat- 
tention, and general nuisance," were in 
England, but during his brief stay at each, 
he managed to gain sufficient knowledge 
for his admission to Christ College, Cam- 
bridge, where his academic and athletic 
careers were interrupted by the war. 

When he was mustered out of the Royal 
Air Force, he came to America, where he 
drilled for oil in Mexico and Texas before 
finding his way to Philadelphia and news- 
paper work. In a newspaper office he 
also found romance, marrying the as- 
sistant society editor of his newspaper 
with whom, and their two children, he 
now lives in suburban Philadelphia. 

His rather divergent diversions are his 
painting and cricket and he is recognized 
as one of the foremost exponents of the 
game. 

And to his credit, witness to the fact 
that success has left him unspoiled, be it 
said that he has never indulged in that 
last (and best) laugh at the expense of 
his former newspaper colleagues to which 
he is justly entitled. For basis of one of 
the most merciless "ribbings" to which 
they subjected him was an occasion when 
a hard-boiled city editor publicly, and with 
somewhat pointed rudeness, rebuked him 
for talking with a yacht salesman on office 
time. The city editor is still a city editor 
— but Carter has a yacht. 



We are happy to announce 

that the winner of 

the Irene Rich Dress, 

created by Frances Clyne 

for RADIO MIRROR'S first 

Fashion Contest, is 

Mrs. Ethel L Booton of 

Springfield, III. 



a seccnu/ day 

take a Beauty Laxative _, 



You simply can't expect to have sparkling 
eyes, a clear youthful complexion and plenty 
of pep, unless you insist on regular elim- 
ination. Never wait a second day. Take a 
beauty laxative. 

Olive Tablets gently and safely help nature 
carry off the waste and poisonous matter in 
one's system; keep you looking and feeling 
fine and fit. And they're non-habit-forming. 

Keep a box of these time-tried beauty 
laxatives handy for the times when nature 
skips a day. Three sizes, l5(-30t-60(. All 
druggists. 



DR. EDWARDS' 

Olive tablets 



LAXATIVE 



OH*V 



athome: 

Learn easy Koehne Method of color- 
ing photos and mlnlaturCR in oil. New! No 
rt traininKnecded. Hi* demand. Send tor 
ee booklet. Make. Money At Home. 

NATIONAL ART SCHOOL 
3601 Michigan Ave. Dcpt. 1389. Chicai* 



TIRE PRICES CUT! 

on repaired ■*Mw/w//&jgm 

GOODYEAR s ^WmK& 

GOODRICH FIRESTONE %$&jKk 



Here are the outstanding standard 
brand tire bargains of the year, re- 
paired by the improved "criss -croaa" 
method and by skilled workmen. Yon 
take no risk when you buy from York* 
— tho old reliable 
tiro house with 19 
years of service In 
this field. Trjoa- 
sanda of tire users 
throughout the 
U. S. declare our 
tires grl ve them 
LONG.SATISFAC 



Wo Receive 
Hundreds of 
totters like this 
"1 bought a S4x4K 
of you 2 years affo 
and it is on dot track 
ret and good for an- 
other year.*'— John 
B. Silver-horn, Mich. 



TOKY SERVICE. Buy Now — at 
these reduced prices and SAVE MONEY. 
Don't Delay — Order Todavl 




BALLOON TIRES 

Size Rim Tires Tubes 

29x4^10-2151.85 J0.S5 

29x4.30-20 2.0O .85 

30x4.5O.21 Z.IO .85 

28x4.75-19 2.15 .95 

29x4.75-20 2.20 .95 

29x5.00-19 2.55 1.05 

30x5.00-20 2.S5 1.05 

6.2I&-17 2.60 1.15 

28x525-18 2.60 1.15 

29x525-19 2.60 1.15 

30x5.25-20 2.60 1.15 

31x6.25-21 2.90 MS 

6.60-17 2.95 1.15 

28x5.60-18 2.55 1.16 

29x5.60-19 2.9S 

6.00-17 3.10 
30x6.00-18 
31x6.00-19 
32x6.00-20 
33x6.00-21 
32x6. SO- 20 

8.00-18 



Sire Tires Tube* 

3n,3>x $1.85 10.75 

31x4 2.65 .85 

32x4 2.65 .85 

33x4 2.6S .85 

34x4 2.90 .86 

32X4K 3.00 1.15 



3.10 

3.10 _ 

3.10 1.25 

3.25 1.25 

3.35 1.35 

3.65 1.45 



REGULAR CORD TIRES 



Siie Tires Tube* 

M 53.10 11.15 
34x4V. 3.10 1.16 
30x5 3.30 145 
33x5 3.40 1.45 
35x5 3.SS 1.65 



HEAVY I &WJTMLC * TIRES 



SIzeTlres Tubes 

30x5 53.70 J1.95 

33x5 3.75 1.45 

34x5 3.95 2.00 

32x« 7.25 2.75 

36x6._S>90 3.95 



Size Tiros Tubos 

34x7 S9.9S S3.25 

38x7 9.9S 3.96 

36x8 10.65 3.95 

40x8 12.6S tie 



TRUCK BALLOON TIRES 



Siie Tires Tubes 

6.00-20 53.25 SI. 65 
8.50-20 3.60 1.95 
7.00-20 4.85 2.95 



SlreTlresTuboa 

7.50-20 $5. 40 3.76 

8 25-20 7.60S4 9S 

9 00-20 9.40 6.66 
8.75-20 12.95 6.45 



ANOTHER Hf.liid_iflLVI.iB 



6 00-16 3.65 1.45 siica. i . _ . — — ; 

SEND ONLY $1.00 DEPOSIT on each tire ordered 
(W 00 on each Truck Tire,) We ship balance C. O. D. 
Deducts per cent if cash la sent In full with order. _o 
fill order promptly we may substitute brands if neces- 
sary. ALL TU15ES BKAND NEW-GUARANTEED- 
HEAVY GAUGE CIRCULAR MOLDED. Guard against 
price advances. Order Now. We » B reo to replace^ at 
half price any «r« falling to give t» months' sendee). 
YORK TIRE & RUBBER CO. Dept.2946 

3835-59 Cottage Grove Ave. C hnc.igg._HK 



RADIO M IRROR 



SAVt vs 50% 6y BUYING YOUR RADIO ^2>lz^ct /ton*— MIDWEST LABORATORIES 



0oriottsTone Realism.. Wor/d-iV/de fttferfainment \tf 00000 feed! 
with JVeiv 1936 *up*r Detoxe 




ONLY 

RADIO COVERING 

Ah TO 2,400 MtTtRS. 



30 Dags f RH Trial ! 




PUSH-BUTTON TUNING 
(Noises Suppressed) 

Now, Push Button Silent Tuning is 
offered for first time! Simply pushing 
Silencer Button hushes set between 
stations . . . suppresses noises. Press' 
ing Station Finder Button automatic- 
ally indicates proper dial position for 
bringing in extremely weak stations. 

Acousti-Tone V-Spread Design 

(Patent Pending) 

...Establishes new radio style overnight! The 
V'Front Dispersing Vanes were developed by 
Midwest engineers as a result of a study of 
directional effect of the Midwest Full Scope 
High Fidelity Speaker. These Vanes spread 
the beautiful lacework of the "highs" through' 
out the entire room in a scientific manner... 
directing the High Fidelity waves uniformly 
to the ear. Send for new FREE 40-page 
catalog. It pictures the complete line of 
beautiful 1936 Acousti-Tone V-Spread con« 
eoles . . . and chassis ... in four colors. 

FULL SCOPE HIGH FIDELITY 
Brilliant 
Concert Tone 

Now, get complete 
range of audible 
frequencies from 
3 to 16,000 
cycles, being 
transm itted by 
four new High Fi- 
delity Broadcasting 
stations — WlXBS, 
W9XBY. W2XR 
and W6XAL. 
Glorious new 
Acousti-tone is 
achieved . . . 
assuring life-like, 
crystal -clear 
"concert" realism. 



EVERYWHERE, radio 

■*- i enthusiasts are praising 

this amazingly beautiful, bigger, better, more 

powerful, super selective, 18-tube 6-tuning range 

radio. They say it is a tremendous improvement) 

over Midwest's 16-tube set, so popular last season." 

It is sold direct to you from Midwest Laboratories!) 

at a positive saving of 30% to 50%. (This state-np***'|% jt,\ „ ,, ^,„ J , ,. „ 

ment has been verified by a Certified Public! | ■ft flilH J^ * , ** 

Accountant who conducted an impartial survey^ 



among representative Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana T h r iH to new explorations in sections of radio 
? ad, ° ■ retailers.) Before you buy any radio write spectrum that are strangers to you. Every type 
for FREE 40-page 1936 catalog. Never before so f broadcast from North and South America, 

Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia is now 
yours. Send today for money-saving facts. 



GEORGE OLSEN PRAISES 
LIFE-LIKE TONE REALISM 

Long Island, N. Y. — After comparing 
many different makes, I finally decided 
upon Midwest. It out-performs other 
radios costing almost twice as much. The 
crystal-clear tone is so life-like that it 
sounds as though I am 
in the studios, actually 
hearing artists performing. 




much radio for so little money. Why pay more? 

You are triple-protected with: One Year Guarantee, Foreign 
Reception Guarantee and Money-Back Guarantees! 
This super Midwest will out-perform $200 to $300 sets on 
a point-for-point comparison. That is why nationally known 
orchestra leaders like Fred Waring, George Olsen, Jack Denny, 
Ted Fio Rito, and others use Midwest sets to study types of 
harmony and rhythmic beats followed by leading American 
and Foreign orchestras. 

80 ADVANCED 1936 FEATURES 

Scores of marvelous features, many exclusive, explain Midwest 
super performance and thrilling world-wide all-wave reception 
. . . enable Midwest to bring in weak distant foreign stations, 
with full loud speaker volume, on channels adjacent to locals. 
Only Midwest offers so many features . . . only Midwest 
tunes as low as AVl meters . . . only Midwest gives the 
sensational new Push-Button Tuning feature, etc. See pages 
12 to 21 in FREE catalog for description of the 80 features. 
Read about advantages of 6 Tuning ranges . . . offered for 
first time: E, A, L, M, H and U. They make this Super 
De Luxe 18-tube set the equivalent of six different 
radios . . . offer tuning ranges not obtain 
able in other radios at any price! 

DEAL DIRECT WITH 
LABORATORIES 

No middlemen's prof' 

its to pay — you buy UPPMV^ 

at wholesale price di- TOJmKA) 

rect from laboratories 

...saving 30% to 50%. Increasing costs 

are sure to result in higher radio prices soon. Buy 

before the big advance . . . NOW . . . while. 

you can take advantage of Midwest's sensational values. 2 

You can_order your Midwest 1936 Full Scope High Fidelity | MIDWEST RADIO CORP., 



TODAY'S FINEST RADIO 
SAYS TED FIO RITO 

My new Midwest is finest radio I have 
had pleasure of hearing. Bass-Treble con- 
trol is marvelous . . . «jL l£ Pj- 
enables one to hear every /"y "D"*^*' 
instrument in orchestra. \J 



%\w 




I 



METAL TUBES 

This Midwest is engineered from the ground up to 

see either the new METAL tubes or glass-metal 

counterpart tubes. Octal sockets and newest circuits 

permit use of either type . . . just as you desire. 



FOR 



MAIL COUPON TODAY/ 



FREE 30-DAY TRIAL OFFER 011*40 
PAGE FOUR-COLOR FREE CATALOG 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



V-FRONT 



Acousti-Tone radio from the 40-page catalog with as much | ft 

certainty of satisfaction as if you were to come yourself s "ept. 51 -r, 

to our great radio laboratories. You save 30% to 50% s Without obligation on my part, »end me 

... you get 30 days FREE trial ... as little as $5.00 | your new FREE catalog, complete de- 

puts a Midwest radio in your home . . . Satisfaction = "j' 5 «' v° ur ''£" al tf^llJ & L'.ilfJ 

j i , ,,, . r trtco i s oner, and rKEfc. Miniature Rotating 

guaranteed or money back. Write today, for FREE catalog, s ig.nJbe Dial. Tbij it NOT an order. 



User-Agents: 
Make Easy| 
Extra Money! 

Check Here; 
for f— If 

details I — I: 



ITU D WEST RADIO CORP. 



Established 1920 Cable Address Ml RACO All Codes 



Name- 



D Check here, it interested In a Midwest All-Wave Battery Radio : 

IIIIIIUMIIIItimiMHIMmilllltlHIHHMMIIM. 



90 




Utt-ThU dainty gfl^tSfi g 
me rly sold tot * 29 f° w ;, s . $1 .90 a month, 
llant diamonds. 7 P 







„ ne », ,ound watch 
M.n-Bulova CommodoT^-a new siy(e „ k 
£ f 1 men . 15 Jewel *°£™&. $2 .58 a month. 



£.Uf. Sweet 9nc. 



MAILORDER DIVISION o/ FINLAY STRAUS 



*W0 BROADWAY-NEW YORK 



|Pept.305-F 



FREE 
Catalog 
To Adults 



Postal Card 
brings it 
without 
obliga- 
tion. 









FREE TO ADULTS - Co 

plete catalog of Diamonds, 
Watcher. Jewelry, Silver- 
wore — all < 

■mj — sent uoon request. 



Yyeldin 



^ 



. . . the best way to make a 
perfect union of two pieces 
of metal is by welding 
them together. 



. . . and the best way 
to make a good cigarette 
is to WELD together the 
right quantity of different 
types of mild, ripe tobaccos 



. . . that is just what we do in making Chesterfield Cigarettes. 
The three types of home-grown tobaccos (Bright, Burley 
and Maryland) are welded together. That is, the qualities 
of each of the three kinds are made into one kind. 

Then these three tobaccos which have been welded 

together are welded with aromatic Turkish tobacco. 

Mixing tobaccos is one thing; blending is another thing —but 

in order to get the best flavor and aroma, the tobaccos should 

be welded together. 




© 1935, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



C_>heSterfteld ...the cigarette that's MILDER 
Chesterfield ... the cigarette that TASTES BETTER 




i ft /ZO R 



JANUARY 



MACFADDEN 
PUBLICATION 



*«# ? 















. 



WHY MARY LOU LEFT THE SHOW BOAT 

The Greatest Jack Benny Story Ever Told 




World's Greatest Authors 

Now Available in Gorgeous 

Single Volume Editions 




ECONOMY 

EDUCATIONAL 

LEAGUE 

1926 BROADWAY • NEW YORK CITY 



THESE authors and their works need no 
recommendation— the books themselves 
need only to be seen to be desired. Bound in 
beautiful red-brown Florentine (limp) leather 
richly hand decorated and with 14 karat gold 
stamping, thin strongly fabricated paper, clear 
cut, easily readable type, rounded corners and 
color toned edges, with nearly one thousand 
pages to each volume, aside from their sterling 
literary worth, these books give an added 
touch of exotic luxury to any home no matter 
how modest or how affluent. Wherever possi- 
ble they contain the author's complete works. 
Where his works are too voluminous his se- 
lected finest works are included. As gifts they 
are ideal. To be appreciated they must be 
seen. Send for one or more today at our risk. 
We will refund your money cheerfully if for 
any reason they prove unsatisfactory. $2.29 
each— any three for $6.50. Circle the numbers 
of the books you want. Use the coupon. 



102, Balzac; 103, Anton Chekhov; 104, Boccaccio; 105, 
Alphonse Daudet; 106, Conan Doyle; 107, Droll Stories; 
108, Alexander Dumas; 109, Ralph Waldo Emerson; 110, 
Gustave Flaubert; 111, H. Rider Haggard; 112, Nathaniel 
Hawthorne; 113, Victor Hugo; 114, Henrik Ibsen; 115, Kip- 
ling; 116, de Maupassant; 117, Edgar Allen Poe; 118, 
Shakespeare (complete with thumb index); 119, Robert 
Louis Stevenson; 120, Tolstoi; 121, Voltaire; 122, Oscar 
Wilde; 123, Benvenuto Cellini; 124, Theophile Gautier; 
125, Jean Jacques Rousseau; 126, Emile Zola. 



$2.29 EACH • ANY THREE FOR $6.50 



Economy Educational League WG-1. 

1926 Broadway, New York. 

I enclose $ for which please send postpaid the leather 

bound volumes indicated below. My money to be refunded on any 
unsatisfactory purchase. 



102 
103 
104 
105 
106 

Name. 



107 
108 
109 
110 
111 



112 
113 
114 
115 
116 



117 
118 
119 
120 
121 



122 
123 
124 
125 
126 



Street 

Town State . 





mt CDr i 

Strike that GOLD at the source 

before it gets serious! 




G 



argle Listerine 

to attack cold germs in 
mouth and throat 

AFTER any long exposure to cold or 
■*- *• wet weather, gargle Listerine when 
you get home. Medical records show 
that late-season football games, particu- 
larly, take their toll in health. Heav] 
chest colds often follow a day in the 
open. The prompt use of Listerine as a 
gargle when you reach home is a pre- 
cautionary measure which may spare you 
such a serious complication. 

Listerine, by killing millions of dis- 
ease germs in the mouth and throat, 
keeps them under control at a time when 
they should be controlled — when resist- 
ance is low. 

Careful tests made in 1931, '32 and 
'34, show that those who used Listerine 
twice a day or oftener caught fewer 
colds than those who did not use it. 
Moreover, when Listerine users did 
contract colds, they were milder and of 
shorter duration than those of non-users. 

At the first symptom of a cold or sore 
throat, gargle full strength Listerine. If 
no improvement is shown, repeat the 
gargle in two hours. While an ordinary 
sore throat may yield quickly, a cold 
calls for more frequent gargling. 

Keep a bottle of Listerine handy at 
home and in the office and use it system- 
atically. Lambert Pharmacal Company, 
St. Louis, Mo. 

LISTERINE 

for Colds and Sore Throat 



LISTERINE COUGH DROPS 
A new, finer cough drop, medicated 
for quick relief of throat tickle, 
coughs, irritations 



io* 




JANUARY - 19.™ 




VOL 5 - NO. 3 



M«i?#« 



BELLE LANDESMAN, ASSISTANT EDITOR • 



FRED R. SAMMIS. 
EDITOR 



WALLACE H. CAMPBELL, ART EDITOR 



Sj>eciaf TectuheA. 

Why Mary Lou Left the Show Boat Fred Rutledge 12 

The Inside Story of Muriel Wilson's Departure 

Jack Benny's Father Tells All! '..-.. Dan Wheeler 14 

The Comedian Revealed by the Man Who Knows Him Best 

What You've Done to One Man's Family Bob Hall 16 

How Your Letters Have Changed This Program 

The Lowdown on Don Ameche's Romance. . Carolyn Somers Hoyt 23 

Listen, Bing! 24 

Nino Martini's Hidden Sacrifices Norton Russell 26 

Secrets About Radio Marriages Curtis Mitchell 28 

Facts You've Never Read About Famous Husbands and Wives 

Housewife at 40 — Star at 44! John Seymour 34 

The Thrilling Story of Kate McComb's Struggle for Stardom . 

Will War Guns Silence Radio? Jean Pelletier 36 

Facing the Music John Skinner 38 

All the News on Bands, Songs and Singers 

Meet the Folks! Dorothy Ann Blank 42 

Go Behind the Scenes of America's Great Barn Dance 

Amateurs at Life Fred Sammis 46 

Another Enthralling Installment of this Fast Moving Love Story 

Radio Mirror's Directory 48 

Vital Statistics on All Your Local Favorites 



Ustufouif JsefxahtmeHti 

Reflections in the Radio Mirror . 4 

The Editor Speaks His Mind 

What Do You Want to Say? 6 

Cash for Your Letters 

What's New on Radio Row Jay Peters 8 

Gossip Hot Off the Presses 
Coast-to-Coast Highlights 

Chicago. . . .- Chase Giles 10 

Pacific Dr. Ralph L. Power I I 

Pageant of the Airwaves 30 

Personalities Revealed in Word and Picture 

Beauty — Christmas Shopping with Kate Smith. . Joyce Anderson 40 

Cooking With Gadgets Mrs. Margaret Simpson 41 

What Do You Want to Know? The Oracle 45 

The Oracle Speaks 
We Have With Us 50 

The Ideal Guide to Programs 



In the February RADIO MIRROR 
On Sale December 24 




Coming in the next issue: The story of how 
Nelson Eddy became a correspondence 
school success. You won't believe it, but 
it's true . . . And watch for his grand 
portrait on the cover . . . Also an excit- 
ing four pages of pictures of all the 
famous stars when they were very young, 
straight out of the old family album. 






fldcLut flWiactUHl 



The Critic on the HeartJi 

Weldon Melick 3 

New Shows Discussed 

Gallery 

Lionel Barrymore 19 

William Daly 22 

Prize Winning Features 20 

Welcome Wallace Beery!. . 44 

—PORTRAIT OF GRACE MOORE 
BY TCHETCHET 




Post Office at Dunellen, New Jersey, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Price in United States $1.00 a year; 10c a copy. In U. S. Possessions, Canada, 
ndland, ( uba, Mexico, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Spain and possessions, and Central and South American countries excepting British Honduras, 
British, Dutch and French Guiana, $1.50 a year; all other countries $2.50 a year. While Manuscripts, Photographs and Drawings are submitted at the owners' 
n^k. every effort will be made to return those found unavailable if accompanied by 1st class postage. But we will not be responsible for any losses of such 
matter contributed. Contributors are especially advised to be sure to retain copies of their contributions; otherwise they are taking an unnecessary risk. 

Printed in the V . S. A. by Art Color Printing Company, Dunellen, N. T. 



RADIO M I R R OR 



THE CRITIC ON THE 
HEARTH 

By Weldon Meliclc 
Brief Reviews of the New Programs 

MAGIC KEY OF RCA— Last year we 
had the Amateur Cycle. This year it's the 
opposite extreme— the dials are so full of 
top-notch celebrities that you can't hear 
President Roosevelt without missing 
Mischa Klman and Schumann-I leink. 
The Celebrity Cycle reaches its highest 
point in this show, which plucks the plums 
from all over the globe. In dizzying 
rapidity you hear the world's most famous 
voices from Manila. Berlin. Tokyo, 
Geneva, or wherever they happen to be. 
A round-the-world trip every Sunday in 
the best company. 

NBC 2:00 P. M. Sun. 60 min. 

THE AMATEUR GENTLEMAN— Up 

to the time this is written, Leslie How- 
ard's script hasn't given him any dramatic 
morsels which would be worthy of Ken 
Maynard's Tarzan. As one of the best 
actors in this or any other country, I tow- 
ard deserves better material than has yet 
been written for radio. This Adverse 
character who talks inanely to himself in 
O'Neill asides doesn't answer to that de- 
scription. 
CBS 8:30 P. M. Sun. 30 min. 

THE NEW PENNY— Helen Hayes gets 
a better break, and from the same author. 
Edith Meiser. Writing a half-hour show 
is much harder work than reading it. 
Hayes and Howard both confine them- 
selves to one show a week — perhaps Miss 
Meiser should follow their example. And 
of the two shows, this is by far the 
safer bet for popularity. Miss Hayes has 
in Penelope a flesh-and-blood character 
who does things besides talk. The au- 
dience will want to know a lot more about 
the busy sprite who has original ideas 
about foundling homes — and life. 

NBC 9:30 P. M. Tue. 30 min. 

ROBERT L. RIPLEY— The dramatized 
stories are perfectly swell, Bob — but some 
of your studio demonstrations of Believe- 
It-or-Nots come to an unseeing audience 
merely as a dull thud or an unimaginative 
Blurp! Please forget you're a pictorial 
artist and give us something wc can get 
our ears into. You have an outstanding 
radio personality — Nelson and his band 
are fine support, and when you get or- 
ganized 1 think your air rating is going 
to creep right up until you find yourself 
in Major Bowes' hair. Believe It or Not 

NBC 7:30 P. M. Sun. 30 min. 

TOWN TOPICS— Lois Long being 
slightly clever as a mistress of not much 
ceremony. I heard pages rattling during 
some of the most delightful informality — 
but whoever painstakingly prepares the 
informality does a swell of a job. Any- 
thing can happen here, and frequently 
does. There's no formula. You just throw 
in a lot of spicy guest-star ingredients, 
add a few dashes of Mark Warnow flavor- 
ing, stir Long, and you've got an aston- 
ishing concoction with everything in it 
but a dull moment 

CBS 3:00 P. M. Tue. 60 min. 

VANISHED VOICES— Ordinary crime 
dramas featuring an invention which 
brings back dead voices. The fantasy 
doesn't mix well with the reality — you get 
neither a Sherlock Holmes nor a Buck 
Rogers in reverse. 

CBS 6:30 P. M. Mon.. Wed. 30 min 



QUICKLY CORRECT THESE , 

rr FIGURE FAULTS 

Perfolastic not only CONFINES . . it REMOVES udy bulges! 







Reduce Your Waist 
In 10 Days . . 

/)/_ housands of women owe their 
^■r^slim, youthful figures to the 
^•"^ sure, safe way of reduction — 
Perfolastic! Past results prove that we are 
justified in guaranteeing you a reduction 
of 3 inches in 10 days or there will be no 
cost. We do not want you to risk one 
penny — simply try it for 10 days at our 
expense. 

APPEAR SMALLER AT ONCE! 

■ Look at yourself before you put on 
your Perfolastic Girdle and Brassiere — 
and afterwards! The difference is amazing. 
Bulges are smoothed out and you appear 
inches smaller at once. You are so com- 
fortable, yet every minute you wear these 
Perfolastic garments you are actually 
reducing . . and at just the spots where 
surplus fat has accumulated — nowhere else! 

NO DIET . . . DRUGS ... OR EXERCISES ! 

■ No strenuous exercises to wear you out 
... no dangerous drugs to take . . . and no 
diet to reduce face and neck to wrinkled 
fiabbiness. You do nothing whatever 
except watch the inches disappear! 

MASSAGE ACTION REDUCES QUICKLY 

■ Every move you make puts your 
Perfolastic to work taking off unwanted 
inches. The perforations and soft, silky 
fining make these Perfolastic garments 
delightful to wear. 



and Hips 3 Inches 
. or no cost ! 

"REDUCED MY HIPS 9 INCHES" *Z"£ly. 
■ "Massages like magic", saysMiss Carroll; 
"From 43 to 34 } 2 ' inches", writes enthus- 
iastic Miss Brian; Mrs. Noble says she 
"lost almost 20 pounds with Perfolastic", 
etc., etc. Test Perfolastic yourself at our 
expense and prove ic will do as much for you! 

SEND TODAY FOR 10-DAY FREE TRIAL 
OFFER AND SAMPLE OF RUBBER! 

See for yourself the wonder- 
ful quality of the material ! 
Read the astonishing experi- 
ences of prominent women 
who have reduced many 
inches in a few weeks! You 
risk nothing . . . we want you 
to make this test yourself at 
our expense. Mail the 
coupon now-' 




PERFOL AS 

Dept. 281.41 E. 42nd ST.. NEW YORK, NY. 
Please send me FREE BOOKLET describing 
and illustrating the new Perfolastic Girdle and 
Uplift Brassiere, also sample of perforated rubber 
and particulars of your 

10 DAY FREE TRIAL OFFER! 



Name- 



Address. 



City. 



Statt- 



Use Coupon or Send Name and Address on Pinny Postcard 

3 



FOR PRIZES FOR 



BEST LETTERS- 



TURN TO PAGE 6 



REFLECTIONS IN 
THE RADIO MIRROR 



CONGRATULATIONS of 
the month to: 
The thirty minutes 
every Thursday night to which 
artists and sponsor contribute 
most of their time and services 
on behalf of that rapidly disap- 
pearing cause, Peace. The pro- 
gram is beautifully done, the 
preachment powerful yet sub- 
dued. I've left the show shiver- 
ing, thinking that it would be 
a long time before I'd be march- 
ing across seas for some foreign 
cause. 

Leslie Howard's "The Ama- 
teur Gentleman." If you heard 
his opening broadcast early in 
October and thought it well 
done I can tell you something 
that will make the whole show 
seem remarkable. The Wednes- 
day morning before that first 
broadcast (Sunday, remember) 
the sponsors and script writers 
were still without a story. Not 
until after lunch that day was 
"The Amateur Gentleman" 
chosen. First rehearsal couldn't 
begin until late Thursday. And, 
incidentally, an hour after the 
program was finished, Mr. How- 
ard was on a plane on his way 
to Hollywood. 

The half hour over WMCA 
and its network every Tuesday 
night sponsored by Movie Mir- 
ror. The bow should be taken 
personally by Ernest V. Heyn, 
master of ceremonies, and the magazine's Eastern Editor. 

I have another bit of information which may sadden 
several fans of The First Nighter broadcasts and which up 
to now remains inexplicable. It was reported to me a few 
hours before we went to press that June iMeredith and 
Charley Hughes would soon be leaving the program. Be- 
cause by the time you read about this you'll be clamor- 
ing for information, I can add that the change seems 
permanent. 

From Katherine Albert, one of Joan Crawford's closest 
friends, comes an eye witness, blow by blow account of 
Joan's rehearsal and actual broadcast of "Within The Law." 
which marked her first microphone appearance. I think it's 
worth repeating because it gives a pretty clear picture of 
what goes on behind the scenes of those Monday night Lux 
Theater broadcasts and shows how Hollywood stars take 
to radio. 

"I saw Joan in the Lux dress rehearsal on Saturday. It 
was, as we know now, the day after her marriage to Fran- 
chot Tone. Nothing in her manner disclosed that she was' 
a bride, except, perhaps, that F'ranchot went with her. He 
and I sat in the control room with the director, Tony Stan- 
ford. 

"Watching Joan, I forgot that she was a high salaried 
4 



THE EDITOR VOICES HIS 
FRANK OPINIONS OF PRO- 
GRAMS AND PERSONALITIES 




Read a vivid blow-by-blow account of Joan 
Crawford's first air appearance for the Lux 
Radio Theater, which occurred just three days 
after her sudden marriage to Franchot Tone. 



star. She kept looking at the 
director, asking him if she was 
all right, more nervous than the 
bit actors with her. The sound 
effects amused her. Hardly any 
of them, I discovered, were 
faked. When someone was sup- 
posed to pick up a telephone, 
the sound effects man did just 
that. And he shut real doors 
and snapped on real lights. 

"Strangely enough Joan acted 
very little with her face. She 
had been determined to conquer 
the medium of radio and she 
knew it must be all done with 
her voice. Although most fa- 
mous actors gesture in front of 
the microphone and make as 
many faces as they would on the 
stage, Joan did not. 

"At the actual broadcast, she 
was giving everything to her 
role as usual. She took it all 
very, very seriously because she 
honestly and truly is interested 
in it and all that it can mean 
and — here's something for you 
— actually uses Lux soap! 

"When the final rehearsal was 
over, incidentally, Joan was so 
exhausted she just lay down flat 
on the floor. Franchot stayed 
with me in the control room, 
preferring to let the director go 
out and tell her how she was. 
"But he told her she was 
swell. So Joan went home and 
spent Sunday working on 
her role. What a honeymoon!" 

My pet subject came up during a conversation I had 
not long ago with Hal Kemp and his publicity manager, 
Dave Albers. We had been talking about radio friendships 
or rather, the lack of them. And it was agreed that no 
matter how it may look to outsiders, no real camaraderie is 
shared in radio. 

Why not, I asked, have a real Radio City some place just 
outside New York City? Westchester, for example, or some 
spot on Long Island? Hollywood is Hollywood mostly be- 
cause it is a city of people all bent on one goal — the mak- 
ing of movies. A radio city would throw the same mantle 
of glamour over radio artists. Perhaps, too, it might serve 
to introduce the stars of the two networks to each other. 
You'd be amazed at the lack of introductions right now. 

The star of a new comedian is flashing in meteoric rise 
across the radio heavens. He's Bobby Burns, than whom 
I've heard no one funnier in a long, long time. Tall, 
bronzed, friendly, he works at the mike with his big hands 
stuck in his pocket? and shifts nervously from one foot to 
the other. As long as his stories about his relatives in Ar- 
kansas hold out, I predict that we're in for a very pleasant 
winter of very human and surprisingly sophisticated 
humor. 







Yet in hei* 
heart she 
knew her 
bad skin 
was no 
asset for 
any job 



P WISH MY SKIN WAS CLEAR 
(^LIKE HERS— BUT THIS IS NO 
BEAUTV CONTEST- BET 
I'M TV/ICE AS GOOD AT 
THE WDR.K 




X WOULD HAVE MIRED 
THAT BLONDE GIR.L TTUST 
NOW. FINE REFERENCES-. 
'^SOUNDS CAPABLE^. BUT / 
MER SKIN /I 




Don't let 

adolescent pimples 

keep VOL' out of a job! 

Between the ages 13 and 25, 
important glands develop. This 
causes disturbances throughout 
the body. The skin becomes over- 
sensitive. Waste poisons in the 
blood irritate this sensitive skin 
— and pimples are the result. 

For the treatment of these ad- 
olescent pimples, doctors pre- 
scribe Fleischmann's Yeast. This 
fresh yeast clears the blood of the 
skin irritants that cause pimples. 

Eat Fleischmann's Yeast 3 
times a day, before meals, until 
your skin is entirely clear. 



SS/ 



'faff 



by clearing skin irritants 
out of the blood 



Copyright. 19Mf>. Standard Brand* lncori«.r»ti-<! 

5 



What do you want to say ? 




WITH the snow piled against the door and the 
temperature around zero, you spend most of your 
evenings with the loudspeaker. How is radio 
treating you? Is it soothing or jangling your nerves? And 
whatever it's doing write us a letter now. Win a prize! 
There are seven prizes in all, $20.00 for the best letter, 
f 10.00 for the second best and $1.00 each for the next five 
selected. Your letter addressed to the Editor, 1926 Broad- 
way, New York City, should reach us by December 23. 
This month these letters won: 

$20.00 PRIZE 
INTELLIGENT LISTENING 

On all sides one hears harsh criticisms of radio. The 
criticisms supposedly come from the more intelligent class 
of listeners and one of their chief complaints is the lack 
of good music. I am tempted to challenge the intelligence 
of these critics; it looks more like radio snobbishness to me. 

For instance, an intelligent person would not go to a 
newsstand, close his eyes, pick a magazine at random, and 
expect to get one suited to his particular taste. Yet many 
persons snap the switch on their radios without regard to 
time, station, or the program listings in the paper, and 
then denounce all radio because a dance orchestra is play- 
ing a popular song instead of a symphony orchestra play- 
ing a classical selection. 

Nor should anyone expect to turn his radio on the first 
thing in the morning, let it run all day and still find it 
entertaining. Even entertainment has its satiation point. 

For intelligent and satisfactory radio listening, one should 
carefully select two or three programs suited to his particu- 
lar taste, listen to them and then turn his radio off. And 
there are programs on the air to suit every taste. 

Zella Boteler, 
Chevy Chase, Md. 

$10.00 PRIZE 
OH, THOSE MORNING PROGRAMS! 

What ails the morning radio programs! Who decides 
what women want to hear while they make the beds and 
wash dishes? Who says it's recipes? 
6 



J 

WANT TO SAY THUMBS UP OR 
THUMBS DOWN ON SOME PRO- 
GRAMS? THEN USE THIS PAGE! 

Alexander Woollcott does some writing himself. For 
"The Town Crier," see page 5? — 7 o'clock column. 



A million of us hopefully listen for something to chew on 
mentally while we automatically pursue the humdrum 
routine of housework. What do we get? Some brazen 
voiced female chirruping about how to break an egg in a 
cup to a million of us who cook as naturally as we breathe. 

Sponsors would earn a warm spot in our hearts if they 
offered recipes by mail and gave us by radio more Sisters 
of the Skillet, more witty comments on the doings of the 
day as Ray Perkins used to on his never to be forgotten 
morning program. 

Tell us, perhaps of some new and thrilling movie in the 
making, a bit of plot and characterization. Give a scene 
from some new book. Describe the latest debutante's com- 
ing-out party. Sing us lullabies and love songs, if you must, 
but don't try to make us suffer with some imaginary hero- 
ine before the breakfast dishes are done and DO let us for- 
get, if we can, that there is still lunch and dinner to prepare. 

Mrs. Cora Quinn, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

$1.00 PRIZE 
THE FARMER'S HUNGRY FOR NEWS 

Radio to us rural-ites seems no longer a luxury but a 
necessity. A necessity to keep us from going "crop crazy" 
in these days of blights, droughts, and fruit failures. Be- 
cause I am a typical farmer listener I feel I speak for 
thousands when I ask for more news broadcasts — EARLY 
in the day and around supper time which is between six 
and seven o'clock on the ranch. How hungry we are for 
news then — the paper's always a day old when dropped 
by the R. F. D. man at the cross roads box and we are 
even too weary to look at it then. It's RADIO NEWS 
BROADCASTS we long for at those hours! 

Mrs. Clarence Rose, 
Sebastopol, Calif. 

$1.00 PRIZE 
SUGAR-COATED WORDS 

Many intelligent and conscientious mothers must resent, 
as I do, the efforts of a number of program sponsors to 
force their way into our homes by appealing in sugar- 
coated (or should I say trinket-coated?) words to the 
children. 

We are willing to agree that "V" Breakfast Cereal, "Y" 
Whole Wheat Bread and "Z" Chocolate Drink are all repu- 
table products, but to buy enough of each of them to keep 
up with all the badges, games and pictures our boys and 
girls are urged to obtain would bankrupt most family 
purses. 

Can't we have the delightful nursery rhyme stories and 









KA IHO MIRROR 



songs ami the wholesome adventure 
dramatizations without all the high-pres- 
sure pleas for box tops and sales slips? 
Mrs. Howard Atkinson, 
South Bend, Indiana. 

$1.00 PRIZE 

A "KITCHEN MECHANIC" 

COMPLAINS 

What do I want to say as a Radio Mir- 
ror Reader and housewife? Well just this. 
Pray tell why do we unfortunate K-Ms 
(Kitchen Mechanics) who have to arise 
at the hectic hour of 5:30 a. m. in order 
to start our husbands on their bitter- 
sweet wage earning daily grind with a 
nice hot breakfast and who seek a change 
of comedy via radio, x have to suffer 
through those early morning daily dozen 
reducing programs when some of us re- 
semble string beans? Then our next best 
bet. about 7 a. m., is to listen to some 
minister who hopes to save our neglected 
souls or as a last resort we can tune in 
on the market reports or learn how to 
make mulligan stew or listen to the lost 
and found column read. Why can't we 
early risers who are in reality the back- 
bone of the nation be favored with a little 
indoor sport recreation furnished by our 
dear faithful radio sponsors such as 
comedy stars of Hollywood, a good thrill- 
ing drama, a snappy popular song vocal- 
ist or even direct contact with the Italian- 
Ethiopian war? Do please come to our 
rescue and try to help brighten our early 
morning hours of drudgery which are not 
always ours from choice. 

Mrs. H. M. Davis, 
San Diego, Calif. 

$1.00 PRIZE 

WHAT ABOUT PHONOGRAPH 

RECORDS? 

Couldn't something be done about local 
stations consuming their spare time by 
playing only phonograph records? It is 
v ery disillusioning to hear Bing Crosby's 
"Boo-Boo" when you realize that he is 
probably at that very minute playing 
with the twins. We are in an age now 
where phonographs are not appreciated 
except when no other means of enter- 
tainment is available. I think when sta- 
tions have to resort to this, something 
should be done. Some local talent could 
do the job! 

May Crowley, 
Birmingham, Alabama. 

$1.00 PRIZE 
WANTED— A NEW TAP ROUTINE 

It seems to me that Fred Astaire is as 
much a part of radio as stage or screen 
by now. That indefinable something that 
IS Fred Astaire, that joyous feeling that 
radiates through you when you hear or 
see him in action. 

Please don't let him be spoiled, though, 
by a repetition of the same songs and 
dances every week, for he is capable of so 
many. Why not let him work out a new- 
tap routine just for radio? We want 
something original for the ether waves 
alone. 

Just his name lifts me out of the 
dumps even if we can't see his flying 
feet. Hurry up, old man television; we 
can picture his wonderful interpretation 
of the terpsichorean art in our imagi- 
nation. His voice, too, is engaging. 

I really can't say enough for the very 
versatile Mr. Astaire. and sincerely hope 
that he has a very long run on the radio. 
Miss Frances Du Bois, 
Sacramento, CaJif. 
(Continued on page 75) 



Words of Wisdom from 



Lovely 



/?/uc& <rf Mki&i 




1 i^t M«* *M^ 




St. &*&> ^ 



16, 



5^5 (A„. f IniLo**- 



^^»^- 



Divinely tall and most divinely fair 
. . . that describes her! Marie Louise 
Thorsen's loveliness is the legendary 
kind. And her skin is just what you 
would suppose — matchless! 

She trusts her skin only to Camay, 
is devoted to it. and uses it faithfully. 
She proved to herself that Camay is 
a gentle, a thorough beiuty soap — 
and there was no more shopping 
around for her. You. too. will find that 
proof — vou. too. will find that Camay 

CAMAY 



brings your loveliness to light — 
working small miracles almost from 
the start. Its fragrant, rich lather 
cleanses oh-so-thoroughly, and it 
leaves your skin so fresh, so soft, so 
young! And you'll be delighted with 
Camay's low price. 

Let Camay bring your loveliness to light. 



rvie Sotzft o£ Beau£c£u£ wowien. 




WHAT'S NEW ON RAD 



10 ROW 






By JAY PETERS 



CHANGES in the announcerial 
staffs of the networks continue. 
Since the last appearance of 
Radio Mirror there have been two 
important defections from Columbia, 
Harry Von Zell and Louis Dean hav- 
ing thrown up their portfolios to be- 
come program directors with advertis- 
ing agencies. As previously noted 
here Jimmy Wallington, Kelvin 
Keech and Frank Singiser left their 
routine posts at NBC to attach them- 
selves to important sponsored shows. 
Other ace announcers on both webs 
a-re planning to become free lancers. 

The shifting about of the mikemen 
brings back to the National studios 
one of radio's most colorful person- 
alities, Norman Brokenshire, famous 
for his hearty "How-do-you-do-e very- 
body" greeting. Brokenshire, in his 
career has had many ups and downs; 
more downs than ups, in truth. 

But now, there being a demand in 
the studios for announcers with names 
and the ability Brokenshire undoubt- 
edly possesses when he is himself, he 
is back in good graces again. As the 
saying goes, the beloved Broke has 
turned over a new leaf and everybody 
who knows this grand character is 
pulling for his complete reformation. 

Meanwhile, another grand announ- 
cer who has suffered somewhat of an 
eclipse by being silent during recent 
broadcasts of outstanding sports 
events, is also staging a come-back. 
Reference is to Graham McNamee, a 
man whose name is a household 
word but who has provoked more ar- 
guments among listeners by his de- 
scriptions of prize fights and baseball 
and football games than is good for 
him. 

The prediction now made by NBC 
executives is that Graham's errors, so 
aggravating to so many sports en- 
thusiasts in the past, won't occur 
again. Graham's presence this Winter 
on a half-dozen of the biggest com- 
mercial programs is convincing proof 
of the confidence placed in him by the 
emperors of the ether. 

TPHE trend of. programs, when this 
was written, was seemingly away 
from those radio stand-bys of yes- 
teryear, the popular singers. The sea- 
son has seen stars from the stage, the 
screen and the opera, first-page news- 
paper figures and current event per- 
sonalities commanding attention on 
the new programs. A check-up 
showed one time favorite warblers 



like Connie Boswell, Donald Novis, 
Jane Froman, Gertrude Niesen, Mor- 
ton Downey, Harry Richman, Jotjy 
Nash, Sid Gary, Barry McKinley, 
Larry Taylor and Mildred Bailey 
were without commercial commit- 
ments although some of these were 
making infrequent guest appearances. 
Doubtless by the time this Radio 
Mirror reaches the stands some of 
these will be signed to contracts. But 
it's a cinch all of them won't so be 
fortunate. 

'W'HIS reporter strolling Fifth Ave- 
nue the other night was attracted 
by the figure of a man, his overcoat 
collar turned up and his soft hat 
pulled down over his face, furtively 
darting into a ladies apparel shop 
long after business hours. Something 
familiar about his carriage caused 
your correspondent to halt and peek 
through the half-drawn shades of the 
store window. 

And sure enough suspicion was veri- 
fied when the lights inside revealed 
the man to be none other than our 
own Lanny Ross! 

Inquiry also disclosed Lanny's se- 
cret — he was inspecting gowns and 
other feminine accessories selected by 
his recently announced bride and 
manager, Olive White. Which is con- 
siderable of a reversal of form, for 
this reporter can .remember when 
Lanny wouldn't wear anything until 
Olive okayed it. Since their marriage 
it appears Olive now won't wear any- 
thing until Lanny okays it. Love sure 
is a wonderful thing. 



Right, bride and groom, Harriet Hil- 
liard and Ozzie Nelson, after their 
October wedding. Below, the newly 
arrived daughter of "Em," of the 
famous Clara, Lu V Em radio team. 



Below, Abe Lyman, Eleanor Powell 
and James "Schnozzola" Durante. 
Lyman, whose music you hear on 
both networks, and Eleanor, lead in 
"Broadway Melody of 1936," recent- 
ly said they were engaged. Credit 
the Schnozzola for playing Cupid. 








ENGAGEMENTS, MAR- 




RIAGES, DIVORCES-NEW 



FACES, SHOWS— HERE'S 



ALL OF RADIO'S CHATTER 



HOT OFF THE PRESSES 



r J'HE idea seems widespread that 
anybody who appears in radio col- 
lects a lot of coin for a few minutes' 
actual work. Fans read of the huge 
^ms paid broadcasting comics, stage, 
screen and opera stars for a single 
performance and assume other enter- 
tainers are compensated in propor- 
tion. The truth is, they are not — de- 
cidedly not. Many of them perform 
on sustaining programs without re- 
ceiving a thin dime. They appear 
gratuitously on the theory they will 
be beard by a potential sponsor and 
signed to a big fat commercial con- 
tract. So before you desert your job 
paying a living wage fifty-two weeks 
a year for a radio career reflect upon 
this actual incident recently occurring 
on one of the chains: 

A physician, a man of standing in 
his profession, had been speaking on 
the air three times a week for more 
than three months. He had made many 
sacrifices to make his broadcast en- 
gagements and had spent much time 
and care on the preparation of his 
material. Then one night the futility 
of the enterprise hit him right smack 
between the eyes. Casting aside his 
prepared script he advanced briskly 
to the microphone and unburdened 
himself to the world as follows: 

"For the past 40 broadcasts 1 have 
labored both night and day to make 
my talks interesting. The reason I 
did not appear the other night was 
because the station sold my time to 
an advertiser. They had promised to 
get me a sponsor and for 40 broad- 
casts I was a sustaining feature — that 
is, broadcasting without pay. They 
have not kept their promise and to- 
night I give you my swan-song. But 
before I go I want to tell you, my 
friends, broadcasting is nothing but 
a racket and — " 

But at this point the astounded an- 
nouncer came out of his trance and 
cut the indignant doctor off the air. A 
staff pianist, standing by for just 
such emergencies, thumped out the re- 



maining minutes of the period. It was 
too bad, too, for the audience would 
have been better entertained — not to 
say enlightened — by the doctor's in- 
side story of his radio experiences. 

W)^HICH reminds me that radio- 
ambitious folk, both young and 
old, flocking to New York to partici- 
pate in the numerous amateur hours 
are proving a problem to the Emer- 
gency Relief Bureau. Their records 
show that each week an average of 
300 out-of-town seekers of radio fame 
become stranded in the metropolis. 
Major Edward Bowes and other con- 
ductors of amateur hours do every- 
thing to discourage competitors com- 
ing from points removed from New 
York but still they come. His rule is 
none but residents of Manhattan and 
immediate vicinity are eligible but 
the neophytes get around this regula- 
tion by making written application 
from a city address after beating, 
bumming and hitch-hiking their way 
to town. It is a very serious situation, 
indeed. 

'W'HERE is great rejoicing in The 
Lambs, famous actors' club, over 
the success of Helen Hayes and Leslie 
Howard in etherized dramas. As a re- 
sult, stage artists, suffering for want 
of jobs in the evil days that have de- 
scended upon the legitimate theatre, 
envisage a real demand for their 
services in the studios. The sponsors 
of Miss Hayes and Mr. Howard found 
a large audience awaiting their at- 
tractions and caught and held their 
attention by presenting them in ve- 
hicles not only adapted to the players' 
personalities and talents but also es- 
pecially constructed for aural pro- 
jection. 

The fact that the same author — 
the expert Edith Meiser previously 
noted for her "Sherlock Holmes" radio 
adaptations — creates the material for 
both stars just about makes her the 
First Playwright of Radio. 




Above, maestro Al Goodman of 
Palmolive Beauty Box Theater leads 
his orchestra from the control room. 
Major Bowes learns a Texas Salute 
after receiving a commission from 
the Texas Centennial Rangers. 

y^ND speaking of Leslie Howard, I 
wonder how well you know this 
fine artist. Here are some sidelights 
on his personality which you may not 
know: Howard is a stage name. His 
real name is Leslie Stainer . . . His 
father was a London stockbroker and 
Leslie's first job was in a bank . . . 
He plays piano and draws as well as 
he acts but yearns to be an author . . . 
Did write one play, "Murray Hill" 
. . . Has blond curls which he hates 
and wears clothes on the stage like 
a fashion plate . . . Off stage is care- 
less about his attire and likes best to 
lounge about in shorts minus socks 
and tie . . . Wears horn-rimmed spec- 
tacles which he discards when read- 
ing or acting . . . Constantly wears a 
chain around his neck to which is ap- 
pended an English coin. It was given 
him at the premiere of "Her Card- 
board Lover" and he has never re- 
moved it since . . . Another good luck 
token always found on his hand is a 
guard ring presented by his mother 
when he was 16 . . . Hates barbers 



COAST - TO - COAST HIGHLIGHTS 



WHAT'S NEW ON 
RADIO ROW Con't 



and rarely eats meal . . . Rides horseback, 
plays polo and also goes in lor swimming 
and tennis , . . Married Ruth Martin, 
nearly 20 years ago and has two children, 
a boy. Ronald, aged I/, and daughter. 
Leslie, aged 10 . . . Latter made her pro- 
fessional debut with her father in radio 
last winter. 

MARRIAGES; divorces and budding 
romances kept the tongues of the 
studio gossips a wagging the past month. 
Some of the weddings were long expected 
as. for example, that of Harriet Milliard 
and Ozzie Nelson: some others, like the 
marriage of Frank Munn. to a New York 
lady banker, and Vet Boswell, of the 
Boswell Sisters, to a South American oil 
man. weren't even suspected. 

While the divorce of Ben Bernie came 
as a surprise to the public, the old 
maestro's intimates were quite prepared 
for if_ But that didn't mean the gossips 
didn't have plenty to talk about in their 
favorite nightclub spots. For the Bernie 
dissolution brought to light a rather 
curious situation, to say the least. 

Bernie (right name Benjamin Ancele- 
vitz), son of a Bayonne, N. J., blacksmith 
and one of eight children, married 2(1 
years ago a girl in the same humble cir- 
cumstances as his own. With her at his 
side he fought for and attained recogni- 
tion, rising from obscurity and poverty to 
fame and fortune. She bore him a son, 
Jason, now 16 years old. Ten years ago 
the radio star discovered his ardor for 
his wife had cooled. His interest turned 
elsewhere but he tried hard to conceal 
his real feelings from his wife. Eventually 
she learned the truth and — another man 
came into her life. 

So, a few days after the divorce was 
granted in Chicago on the grounds of 
desertion the ex-Mrs. Ancelevitz married 
Sergius Rolbei.n in New York. And the 
aging maestro has announced he will 
marry Dorothy Wesley, the swimmer, and 
his heart interest of many years. The 
ceremony, probably, will be performed 
before you read this. 

Vaughn de Leath, "the original radio 
girl", so called because she was the first 
man or woman to croon on the air from 
Lee de horest's experimental station 'way 
back in 1919, also got her separation on 
the grounds of desertion from her artist- 
husband, Leon Geer. She testified Geer 
left her Easton (Conn.) home, oddly 
enough misnamed (in this case) "The 
Hitching Post," four years ago after they 
had been united in the holy bonds of 
matrimony for seven years. 

Add to marriages: Will Osborne, the 
bandmaster once Rudy Vallee's crooning 
rival, to Jean I leimes. the model . . . 
'I he gossips like to couple the names of 
Harry Salter, the ork pilot, and Rosaline 
Green, one of the pioneer radio actresses 
. . . Ditto Dave' Rubinoff and Muriel 
Love . . . And Charlie Day. of the Eton 
Boys, recently divorced, and Marjorie 
Clover . . . But don't place too much 
credence in that romance of Abe Lyman 
and Eleanor Powell . . . They are very 
gooil Iriends but il is doubtful if they 
will ever lace the preacher. man — together, 
of course. 

Suppose you heard Gracie Allen and 
George Burns adopted another baby. 



Id 



This time its a boy, named Ronald John, 
to be a playmate for their adopted daugh- 
ter. Sandra Jean, now 15 months old . . . 
The Teddy Bergmans are shopping for 
a baby-buggy . . . Nino Martini is very 
much interested in Anita Louise, heroine 
of "A Midsummer Night's Dream", but 
for that matter, who isn't? . . . And didja 
know that Announcer led Pearson is the 
husband of the ex-Mrs. Ted Fio-Rilor 

Johnny Green, the composer-conductor 
and Mrs. Johnny Green (nee Carol Falk). 
have come to the parting of the ways . . . 
Patiently awaited is the formal an- 
nouncement of the marriage of Lily Pons 
and Maestro Andre Kostelanetz. It is 
supposed to have happened several weeks 
ago . . . Lennie Hayton, since his mar- 
riage to the former Mrs. Ted Husing, has 
quit his nightclub meanderings and settled 
down to a life of domesticity bewildering 
to his cronies. 

And speaking of bandsmen (see preced- 
ing paragraph) Radio Row is still laugh- 
ing about what happened on a radio pro- 
gram a few weeks ago when a maestro 
furnished the musical background for his 
former sweetheart, a blues singer. Before 
she sang he played two selections. "I'll 
Never Forget I Loved You'' and "Some- 
body Stole My Girl". Then she warbled 
"I'm With the Right Guv Now". Can you 
beat it? ((.onunued on pag< 74) 



CHICAGO 

By Chase Giles 



WHEN WGN opened its new stu- 
dios, in Chicago, Col. R. R. Mc- 
Cormick hit upon a happy thought. 
Instead of inviting socialites and business 
leaders for a gala opening party he turned 
the entire auditorium studio over to work- 
men. Architects, artists, electricians, and 
their families were given all the seats to 
the special shows featuring stuttering Roy 
Atwell, beautiful Marion Claire, Harold 
Stokes' dance unit and Henry Weber's 
concert orchestra. The colonel got up 
on the stage to make a speech opening 



night. He had a long talk written out. 
But when he began to talk he simply 
rambled on and with tears in his eyes bid 
adieu to the workmen whom he had 
watched put into stone and steel his dream 
of the midwest's biggest and best radio 
studios. He didn't even open up the type- 
written pages of his talk. 

* * * 

Bill Cooper who writes the Lights Out, 
nerve wracking dramas, is going to cherish 
for a long time a telegram he got the 
other day: 

PLEASE ACCEPT THIS UNSOLIC- 
ITED CRITICISM OF LAST NIGHT'S 
SKETCH STOP IT WAS BEST WRIT- 
TEN AND MOST NATURAL DIA- 
LOGUE I HAVE EVER HEARD ON 
THE AIR AND MAINTAINED A 
WELL-NIGH PERFECT SUSPENS1 
STOP ACTING SPECIALLY FINE 
STOP REGARDS LEE TRACY 

* * * 

Greatest mystery of the season is a 
package which arrived at WBBM ad- 
dressed to Mr. and Mrs. Pat Flanagan, 
and containing about three dozen cards 
of assorted buttons of various colors and 
sizes. No words of explanation accom- 
panied the strange gift. 

* * * 

Norm Sherr, Chicago CBS pianist, is 
particularly proud of a concert grand 
piano, especially built for him by hi* 
sponsor, the Starck Piano Company. Norm 
says that he'll probably have to knock 
out the side of his home to get the piano 
in, but that it's worth it. Norm has a 
fan club named after him at the Univer- 
sity of South Dakota. The members are 
all piano students and are trying to 
emulate his style at the keyboard. 

* * * 

Morgan Eastman comes from a sailing 
family in Wisconsin. Ever since the con- 
ductor of the Edison symphony and the 
Carnation Contented (Cont'd on page 55 I 



You've heard them frequently over 
NBC from Chicago. Left to right, 
June, Joan and Jeri, harmony trio, 
with Jill, who is their accompanist. 




COAST - TO - COAST HIGHLIGHTS 



PACIFIC 

By Dr. Ralph L. Power 



THIS is the time of year when radio 
columnists will be getting out their 
annual radio team. 
I'd like to nominate a one-person team. 
Who? Ruth Etting. No more charming 
person has ever graced radio's ranks. She 
would be the whole show on my all-star 
1935-'36 radio team for (a) her beautiful 
musical tribute at the Will Rogers services 
(b) showin§| up and singing at the Los 
Angeles Junior Chamber of Commerce an- 
nual radio banquet, cross country via 
CBS, when all the other big-names didn't 
show up and (c) giving unstintingly of 
her vocal ability to entertain a half-dozen 
plug-ugly radio editors as guests of her 
sponsors and NBC. She's a swell gal. 

* * * 

New Year resolutions of a few coast 
radio folks. "Charley Lung," really Bar- 
ney Davey, who does the Charlie Chan 
radio characterizations, to write a dog 
story to end dog stories". Carroll Nye, 
KHJ news commentator, never to call 
real estate men Escrow Indians. Dick 
Powell, Hollywood Hotel star, to still call 
'em song pluggers even though the new 
title is "contactees." Floy Margaret 
Hughes, NBC actress, to walk up Mt. 
Tamalpais for exercise. George Godfrey, 
KOMO drama head, not to see so many 
movies. Emil Hansen, KJR marimba- 
phone artist, to build that sailboat. 

* * * 

Tommy Harris, NBC Coast singer, 
doesn't want to buy a dog owner. But 
wants a dog. A dog merchant penned 
Tommy as follows: "You will find the 
owner of these pups for sale at the lunch- 
stand on the highway just outside San 
Mateo." 

* * * 

Young Tommy Lee, head of the Don 
Lee Broadcasting System, is driving his 
own car again these days. The judge took 
away his driver's license for a while be- 
cause of too many traffic tickets. But 
Tommy has chauffeurs on the staff. And 
all his girl friends can drive, too. 

* * * 

Jay Sims, new NBC announcer in San 
Francisco, is twenty-five, tall and dark 
complexioned. Born in New York, he went 

It's her nimble fingers that have car- 
ried her to fame. Madge Baldwin, 
pianist, is on the Going to Towners 
show over JKF Mondays and Fridays. 




to school in Pittsburgh and graduated in 
Law. Then he enlisted in the Fifty-first 
Signal Battalion and went to Scofield 
Barracks in Hawaii. 

* * * 

Leon Belasco has been playing via KNX 
in Hollywood from the civic auditorium 
over in Pasadena. Though in New York 
in recent years, he was long a KFWB 
favorite in Hollywood before that. He 
was born in Russia, educated in the Orient, 
and is a whiz at the violin besides being 
a conductor. Maybe somebody will tell 
me what his real name is. I've forgot- 
ten it. ' 

* * * 

Eddie Albright, KNX announcing vet- 
eran, now in his eleventh year there, is 
a smart hombre. He doesn't let any pub- 
lication use his picture. Souvenir edition 
of a Hollywood paper, when KNX dedi- 
cated its new studios, had pictures of 
everybody on the station except Eddie. He 
got tons more publicity than he would 
have if his mug had been shown. 

* * * 

Kay Van Riper, who writes the gor- 
geous KFWB historical dramas, has taken 
up ranch life in the San Fernando valley. 
Of course she hasn't ten acres, as her 
press agent said, and the house isn't quite 
as big as the blurb sheets printed, but 
one part of it was okay — Kay is really 
taking up the life of a country gentle- 
woman and likes it. 

* * * - 

Kay Thompson is a sly person. She's 
been lolling 'round Hollywood while the 
NBC Hit Parade was on the Coast. Her 
favorite steed at the riding academy was 
re-named King. But whom did she name it 
after? Kay won't tell. But there are the 
Rhythm Kings, peppy male trio of the 
Hit Parade; Jerry King, chief of KFWB; 
the King's Outfitting Company; King's 
Horses Tavern — and lots more. Oh, Kay. 
How could you? It was a black horse. 
Do you suppose it was named for Haile 
Selassie? 

* * * - 

Bill Royle has dropped down from San 
Francisco, where he was for years with 
the chain, to KHJ to m.c. its early morn- 
ing pep hour. The commander-in-chief of 
the Rise and Shine program was a war- 
time aviation lieutenant and later a cap- 
tain in the reserves. He has a young 
daughter who wants to be an opera singer, 
but she is only just starting to school. 

* * * 

Robert Olsen is on the air again. This 
time it's NBC from northern California 
on the You Name It program. He was 
born Robert Nelson but uses the Olsen 
handle for radio. He has two children, a 
boy about eighteen and a girl of sixteen. 

* * * 

If you've been looking for Ann Leaf, for 
five years CBS organist in New York, here 
she is. Nowadays she pulls the stops at 
KHJ. The tiny brunette made her musi- 
cal debut in Los Angeles at the age of 
fifteen. She wrote her theme song, "Song 
of the Midnight," and a couple more 
called "Mirage on the Desert" and 
"Chromatic Cocktail." 

* * * 
Hollywood Meanderings: Jack Benny 

likes publicity the least of any of the big 
shot radio names. Eddie Cantor has a 
barber chair and a grand piano in the 
parlor of the bungalow on the film lot. 
Ozzie Nelson didn't do much sightseeing 
while playing his Ambassador engagement. 
Sterling Young, youthful band leader, was 
adopted by the late Lawrence Mott. of 
Catalina. when the major owned KFWO. 



Meet the new NBC Nuts and Bolts 
comedians. "Nuts" is slim young Kenneth 
Gillum. "Bolts" is heavy-set Leo Geary. 
Both used to be on the Gilmore circus 
years ago, Cleary as the barker and Gillum 
teamed with Duke Atterbury. They play 
the piano, sing and do gag stuff. The boys 
are slightly cuckoo on their program. 
That's the way the public likes us, sez the 
duo. 

* * * 

In case you can use the information, 
former KOMO staff people now some- 
where "in the movies" includes Ann LeVel, 
Roger Joseph. John Shaughnessy, Frances 
Farmer and Kaye Brinker. - 

* * * 

llanley Stafford, former Los Angeles 
radio drama man, now in New York radio 
circles, writes that he now speaks the 
best New Yorkese. 

* * * 

The matrimonial ranks haven't been 
disrupted much lately in coast radio. II. 
Duke Hancock, KGFJ head, was divorced 
by his wife, Gladys Mae Hancock, in Reno. 
Billie Lowe, who brought suit for divorce 
(Margaret Lowe), filed voluntary bank- 
ruptcy petition with assets of 8160 and 
debts of * 1,1 50.80. 

* * * 

Grant Merrill, KOMO-KJR continuity 
head and conductor of the Easy Chair 
program, has a theme thought of "A 
word a day keeps the moron away." And 
somebody says: 

I wish I were a moron, as happy as 

a clam. 
I wish I were a moron. My gosh, per- 
haps 1 am. 

* * * 

They still relate that True Boardman. 
KHJ narrator, feverishly paced the hos- 
pital corridor and when he heard the cry 
of his new-born daughter pressed his stop 
watch. Such is the precision of micro- 
phonists. 

* * * 

Pat Weaver, former KFRC program 
man, now making a name for himself pro- 
ducing in New York, is a Dartmouth man, 
class of 1930. Twenty-seven years old and 
single, the red-haired youth says he got 
into radio by mistake, but intends to stay 
there. 

* * * 

When you hear the little girl voice on 
some of these Hix "Strange As It Seems" 
programs it is Barbara Jean Wong, aged 
ten, who speaks Chinese and English with 
equal fluency. Some of these days she will 
be a find in the films for she both sings 
and dances well. She was in "Alice in 
Wonderland" as a little English girl. 

* * * 

Phil Regan, NBC tenor and Warner 
picture player, one time a New York 
policeman and a network singer, owns a 
collie dog and a 12-cylinder car. He was 
born in Brooklyn in 1908, and his first job 
was in the navy yard at Charleston, South 
Carolina. 

* * * 

Carl Kroenke, KFRC character actor, 
lists coin collecting, and hiking as his 
hobbies. He first came into radio at 
KFDB. San Francisco, in 1923, and his 
first regular radio routine was on a crime 
club program at KFRC. 

* * * 

NBC's new Hollywood studios are now 
settled down to routine after their swanky 
opening. The visitors' gallery is smaller 
than the former quarters. Tendency is for 
smaller visible audiences, and perhaps 
gradually the total elimination of audi- 
ences with the exception of programs fea- 
turing comedians. 

11 



v Tff *>• 







WHY 



LEFT THE 




SHOW BOAT 



ONE of radio's sweetest romances has ended. Thurs- 
day night's Maxwell House Show Boat has lost one' 
of its most popular performers. Mary Lou is 
off the air. 

Late in September, Muriel Wilson, after nearly two years 
as the Mary Lou who won the hearts of myriad listeners, 
stood before the microphone, tears blurring the music in 
her hands. She sang from memory the Merry Widow Waltz 
— her swan song on the show. 

Singing this song, the same melody with which a few 
years ago she had scored an overnight success on her net- 
work debut, she knew that behind her lay one of the hap- 
piest periods of her life; ahead, only uncertainty. One of 
radio's strangest stories began that night. 

Already, as this is being written, fans are demanding to 
know why the romance they have lived in their hearts so 
long has been brought to a sudden close. But to Muriel 
there is a still more important question, for upon its an- 
swer depends her entire future. 

One reason for Mary Lou's departure from Show Boat 
has been given over the air — she has gone to New York to 
study music. To Muriel and to Lanny Ross, another ex- 
planation was supplied hy the sponsors. The public, for 
whom the romance of Lanny and Mary Lou had been 
almost a sacred thing, was losing interest. New life, it had 
been decided, must be breathed into the program. 

The first step was taken when the Westerners, four boys 
and a girl, joined the troupe. The second celebrated an- 
other anniversary of the Show Boat. With due ceremony 
and pomp, Lanny Ross was installed as the master of 
ceremonies, and the title of the show changed to "Lanny 
Ross's Show Boat." The third came that same night, when 
Mary Lou said goodbye. 

It was not, the sponsors revealed to interested reporters, 
their plan to forget Mary Lou. Some time in the future 
she would return to face the problem of winning back 
i.anny's love all over again. 

But when I talked to Mu- 
riel I learned that the situa- D / FRED R 
12 



tion was not so easily clarified. 1 met her on 
the Monday after her final appearance, on the 
fourth floor of NBC's Radio City. With crowds 
of unheeding sightseers, led by uniformed 
ushers, swarming past us, we discussed the prob- 
lem she is facing 

"1 tried not to be sentimental Thursday 
night." she said. "1 knew that in radio no per- 
former can afford to let her personal feelings 
interfere with her work. I told, myself that 
even though my part of Mary Lou had ended, 
it meant nothing more than the end of a job. 
Yet it does mean more. You can't identify 
yourself with a character for two years, as I 
did with Mary Lou, and still consider it only a 
piece of work. 

"To me Mary Lou was one of the grandest 

people I have ever known. She typified all 1 

have ever liked and admired. I know from the countless 

letters 1 have received that Mary Lou's fans felt the same 

way." 

She hesitated a moment, and then went on. answering 
me before I could ask. "Why speak of Mary Lou in the 
past tense? After all. isn't she going to return to Show 
Boat'" 

"And now all that is over. How can anyone expect Man'. 
Lou or at least me. to return? That's why 1 say no radio 
performer can afford sentimentalities. If I could. I'd wait, 
and when they decided to bring Mary Lou back. I'd be 
ready. But it's obvious why I can't do that. 

"In the first place, I have no assurance that Mary Lou 
really will ever be a part of Show Boat again. In the second 
place, if she should return, she may be a new Mary Lou 
and not Muriel Wilson at all. So you can see what i musi 
do. I must do my best to forget Show Boat and begin 
looking for a new program " 

MND that is why, when 1 talked to Muriel, she wa^ so 
,/m troubled and doubtful of her future. True, she knew 
what her next step ought to be — to place herself on another 
show. Yet there is an almost insurmountable difficulty in 
her way. 

"Imagine," she continued, "what a sponsors reaction will 
be when I tell him 1 am no longer connected with Show 
Boat. He will shake his head and say, 'You are still Man 
Lou to the radio audience. I'd like to present you on a 
program as plain Muriel Wilson, but I know it wouldn l 
work. They'd still think of you as that girl who is in love 
with Lanny Ross 

"Not that 1 agree. Let me tell you what happened to 
me last week. One of my largest fan clubs is in up-state 
New York. As soon as the members of the club learned 
that Mary Lou was going off the air, the president wrote 
me that they had already voted to change the name from 

the Mary Lou Fan Club to 
i I t i r r\ r* r t ^ ie Muriel Wilson Club and 
U L t U v t were planning to send flov - 




Muriel tried not to 
be sentimental when 
she sang her swan 
song on the Thurs- 
day night program, 
but the tears came 
nevertheless. Below, 
with Lanny before 
they had separated. 



„ , r ee Jackson 



THE TRUE STORY OF WHAT'S HAPPENED 



TO MURIEL WILSON SINCE SHE WAVED 



GOODBYE TO LANNY AND WENT ASHORE 




ers to the anniversary program, marked. 'In memory of 
Mary Lou.' 

"A proof of loyalty like that gives me courage. I know 
that just at first things may be difficult. Many sponsor 
will give me the same answer, and 1 may have to wait 
longer than I think before they realize that I'm not Mary 
Lou, but Muriel Wilson. In the end. though, things are 
bound to work out." 

Already, as we go to press, Muriel is auditioning for a 
brand new program, and the NBC Gilbert and Sullivan 
light opera series which she joined some time ago. and in 



which she is introduced as Muriel Wilson, is continuing 
indefinitely 

Muriel's future is not the only one which has been left 
unsettled. Even Show Boat's sponsors have not deter- 
mined what will be the further adventures of this mythical 
craft and its crew. Show Boat is not the same program 
that was ushered on the airwaves three years ago in Octo- 
ber. After two years of smooth sailing. Charles Winninger, 
the man who created the role of Cap'n Henry, withdrew 
and was replaced by Frank Mclntyre. Since that time 
the boat has burned down, a new (Continued on page 58) 

13 



IN suburban Lake Forest, just 
north of Chicago, lives a 
proud and happy man. His 
name is Mayer Kubelsky, and his son is Jack Benny. 

I found him in the back room of the little haberdashery 
and tailor shop he founded in Lake Forest. His son-in-law, 
Leonard Fenchel, is the proprietor now, but Kubelsky still 
spends most of his time in the store, talking to old friends 
and to the tailor who has been with him for the past 
twenty-five years. 

Jack Benny's father is slight, thin, upright in bearing. 
His hair, almost entirely gray, sweeps straight back from 
a high forehead, and his brown eyes, deep-set, glow with 
honest pleasure as he greets you. He is full of a simple, un- 
hurried courtesy, combining the dignity of the old world 
with the warm humanity of the new. 

It doesn't take one long, talking to him, to realize what 
a close bond of affection there is between him and the son 
who every Sunday evening makes a gift of laughter to 
millions of people. The inflection of his voice, the ex- 
pression of his wise, kind eyes, as he speaks of Jack, tells 
of the sympathy and love each feels for the other. 

Yet there was a time when this beautiful relationship 
could have been ruined forever, when Jack's future happi- 
ness and success hung on a single word. Mayer Kubelsky 
is thankful now that he had the wisdom to conquer the 
anger and prejudice in his heart, and refrain from speaking 
that word. 

The story goes back to the days when Jack, not yet grown 
into long trousers, was playing violin in a movie-theater 
orchestra. That was in Waukegan, Illinois, Jack's birth- 
place. The Kubelskys had the attitude of their race toward 
music — as something primarily a part of one's life, not a 
means of making a living — and the thought of music as a 
career for Jack had never entered his father's mind. 

No, the orchestra job was looked on as a source of pocket- 
money for the boy — that and good experience. In the 
meanwhile, he would continue going to school and, when 
the time came, would take charge of the clothing business. 



At the left, Jack's 
Dad, in Florida where 
his famous son sends 
him every year. There 
was a time though when 
they almost parted for 
good. The other man 
is Jack Pearl's father. 



By DAN WHEELER 



For Jack Benny's prpgram 
sponsored by JeJ/o, see 
page 54 — 7 o'clock column. 




Since 1885, Kubelsky had been 
working to build up a prosperous 
commercial establishment, a worthy 
bequest to leave a clever and energetic only son. 

Not that young Jack, in those days, showed any par- 
ticular aptitude for a merchandising career. "I left him 
alone in the store one day when I had to go to Chicago," 
Kubelsky reminisced. "When I come back, a policeman 
meets, me at the depot. 

" 'We want you to come over to the station and identify 
some pants,' he tells me. So I go with him to the police 
station, and there, sure enough, are about a dozen pair of 
pants from my store. 

"I go home and I say to Jack, 'Did you have some cus- 
tomers?' He tells me no, just one man who wanted to look 
at shoes. 

"'But,' I say, 'you sold some pants, didn't you?' And 
that makes Jack angry, because he thinks 1 am accusing 
him of selling some pants and not giving me. the money. 
'No. Father,' he says, 'I did not, either, sell any pants!' 

"And this is how it was," Kubelsky, his eyes twinkling, 
rose from his chair and demonstrated to me with ges- 
tures. "Here is the man sitting down, and right behind him 
are the pants, and every time Jack turns away to get an- 
other pair of shoes, the man reaches behind him and grabs 
a few pair of pants and puts them into his suitcase. But 
Jack didn't even miss them when the man left — without 
buying any shoes, either!" 

On another occasion Jack, left in charge of the store; fell 
asleep, probably from sheer boredom. Once he complained, 
his nose wrinkling in disgust after he had sold a pair of 
shoes to a long-unwashed farmer, "Father, you want me 
to make my living that way?" 

But, his father thought, the boy would outgrow this dis- 
taste for business as he grew older and learned that work 
is the lot of every man, and he was entirely unprepared 
when, at the end of his second year in high school, Jack 
announced that he wanted to go on the stage. 

The stage! It was unthinkable to the elder Kubelsky. 
Every instinct in him rebelled against permitting his son 
to lead the life of a roving vaudeville performer. His mouth 
set in grim lines. 

"Where do you get this crazy idea?" he asked. 

"Miss Salisbury, the pianist in the theater orchestra, says 
I can play the violin well enough to go in vaudeville," Jack 
told him, white-faced but determined. 

"She should mind her own business," he growled. 

For several days they argued the point, the father reiter- 
ating his contention that stage folk were bums, riff-raff, im- 
moral, and no good; the son sticking tenaciously to but one 
argument — that to play his violin in vaudeville was the one 
thing in life he wanted to do. As Kubelsky realized how 
serious and determined Jack was, (Continued on page 73) 



I 




^FATHER TE1LS ALL / 



FROM THE ONE MAN WHO REALLY KNOWS HIM COMES A MOST 



14 






y ABOUT RADIO'S ACE COMEDIAN 




WHAT YOUVE DONE TO 



IF I were privileged to write an open letter to the 
great American radio public on the subject of One 
Man's Family, I'd start it like this — 

"DEAR FRIENDS. You know not what you do!" 

For the fact is, consciously or otherwise, the great 
American family of listeners has largely controlled the 
destinies of this drama, which is heard by the nation 
every Wednesday evening from the NBC studios in 
San Francisco. 

They virtually have directed the unfolding of this 
simple story of American home life, since the day it got 
its first trial on the air. If their response at the start 
had not been what it was the program would have died 
an early death. 

Carlton E. Morse, the bald but young author, told me 
all about the early days of the program, when it was 
heard only in the West. He described its evolution into a 
transcontinental feature two years ago, and the nation's 
reaction. 

He told of the interesting, frequently amusing, and sev- 
eral times semi-tragic consequences of the fan mail One 
Man's Family has pulled — many more than 1,000,000 
replies. 

I shall not quote Morse on these points. He is an un- 
usually modest writer, considering the gusto with which 
America has accepted his brain child. But I will discuss 
some of the highlights which listener-interest has developed 
in the script, the amusing mail which has resulted, and the 
consequent effect in the lives of Henry and Fanny Barbour 
and their brood. 

It might be doubted that a radio program — strictly en- 
tertainment and non-political — could incite international 
reactions. Yet a recent episode warmed the pulse beat of 
the Canadians and brought a flock of protests from zeal- 
ously patriotic Americans. 

It was the marriage of Claudia Barbour to Capt. Nicho- 
las Lacey, whose role is that of a young British Army 
captain. 

American mothers of American sons n ^\ n 

hurried to the mails. They demanded By BOB 



ONE 

MAN'S 
FAMILY 



to know 
why Claudia 
had selected an Eng- 
lishman. Their almost unanimous question was: 

"Aren't there enough fine young American boys from 
which to choose?" 

BUT — And Morse chuckled when he told it — the mar- 
riage of Claudia arid Capt. Lacey helped vastly to develop 
a more, enthusiastic Canadian audience. Letters of praise 
literally poured across the northern border. 

Mothers throughout the country frequently take the 
serial as a weekly barometer on many of their own lives' 
problems. Mother Fanny Barbour receives hundreds of 
letters, describing daily difficulties in the lives of the 
writers, and asking for advice. 

But the listeners' ardor, so desirable in many respects, 
has spelled disillusionment, heart-break, and minor tragedy 
in the lives of three young actresses. 

The toughest problem Morse has 
been called upon to face, one which 

HALL has 'proved well-nigh insurmountable, 



Left, the heads of the famous Family, Henry and Fanny 
Barbour, played by J. Anthony Smythe and Minetta 
Allen. Below, a new picture of Paul Barbour (Michael 
Raffetto) and his adopted daughter (Winifred Wolfe). 







READ THE AMUSING, OFTEN SEMI-TRAGIC RESULTS YOUR FAN MAIL 
HAS ON THIS HOUR— HOW YOU ALONE DIRECT ITS DESTINIES 



For One Man's Family, 
sponsored by Stand- 
ard Brands, see 8 
o'clock column, p. 54 

Left to right, beau- 
tiful Kathleen Wil- 
son, the Family's 
Claudia; Barton 
Yarborough, who is 
Clifford in the 
Wednesday night 
drama; and Helen 
Stryker, Clifford's 
new love interest, 
once played with 
David Warfield. 




is finding a girl for Clifford. The first three brought into 
Clifford's life literally were "pan mailed" out of the script. 

"Many of our listeners have preconceived ideas as to the 
type of young woman Clifford must have." said Morse. 

"In the cases of the first three they had various objec- 
tions. Sometimes it was the voice — sometimes the character 
portrayed. 

"Whatever it was the audience, in its most scathingly 
critical mood, swamped us with mail. Most of it found 
fault with Clifford's girl friends. 

"lime after time I've seen these young actresses, geared 
to high tension by realization they were on trial before a 
great unseen audience, leave the studio in tears " 

And because of uncertainty and the awareness of audience 
criticism the girls often gave successively worse perform- 
ances, rather than better. The three had to be written 
from the script because of audience comment, which prob- 
ably was well-intentioned. 



Clifford's latest flame, Marion Galloway, has lasted 
longer than the others. The part is played by Helen Stry- 
ker, a young Seattle actress of stage experience. Apparently 
she is "beating the rap." The objections against her are 
becoming fewer and less insistent. But she. too. often has 
left the studio with tears streaming from her eyes. 

In such cases the other members of the cast really live up 
to the philosophy of the imaginary family. They've shown 
their understanding by being pals with the new girls, taking 
them to lunch. Parties and picnics have been arranged to 
make them feel at home. 

Since inception of the program, One Man's family has 
held a high place in the regard of churches. Parent Teachers 
Associations, and home folk throughout the country. Often 
the play has been regarded as a moral and uplifting force. 

And so — to the listeners — the program became synony- 
mous with wholesome home life. Because of it there re- 
sulted last winter an amazing demonstration of the power 



Right, Michael Raf- 
fetto, Minetta Allen, 
Winifred Wolfe, Ber- 
nice Berwin (Haze 
Kathleen Wilson, Bar- 
ton Yarborough, An- 
thony Smythe and 
Page Gilman. Below, 
Carlton E. Morse. 







of fan mail, when written by irate auditors. 

The mail began shortly after One Man's Family be- 
came a selling feature for a new brand of cigarettes. Thou- 
sands of letters objecting to the affiliation were delivered 
by Uncle Sam's letter carriers. 

Many of the writers did not object to smoking. The pro- 
testants claimed it was inappropriate for an uplifting radio 
characterization of American home life to be followed by 
a plug for a cigarette. Many thought the drama no longer 
could be safely recommended to children — that it encour- 
aged their smoking. 

When One Man's Family and its sponsor reached a part- 
ing of the ways soon after, it was to a large extent directly 
due to this mail. 

Then there was the time Jack, the young son, became 
wayward. Worried, he sought the advice of a quack doc- 
tor. The episode created a mild flurry in the mail bags. 
While some found the scenes objectionable, others praised 
the manner in which the subject was handled. 

Many mothers wrote they were using the two episodes — 
concerning Jack's fall from grace and his visit to the quack 
— as a basis for introducing a discussion of the subject of 
sex with their own sons. 

A psychologist might best analyze the reaction of the 
fans to Beth Holly, Paul Barbour's young widow friend, 
who recently was married a second time, after Paul had 
waited too long. 

Either they like her or they 
don't. 

With the men Beth Holly has 
been a popular character. Morse 
suspects that those members of 
her own sex who enjoy her char- 
acterization may have had simi- 
lar experiences of their own. The 
others, he says, "hate her guts." 

As a young, sophisticated 
widow — her first script husband 
was killed in a plane crash — she 
represents the type of person 
many women secretly fear, says 
Morse. Often those who dislike 
her write that "Paul is too high 
a type for Beth Holly." 

As Morse puts it, any girl who 
has had the experience of mar- 
riage, and then become free of its 
bonds, has a real personal prob- 
lem. Some men refuse to traffic 
with women of experience. Others 
regard them as worthy prey for 
their clandestine pleasures. All 
this has helped to make the role 
of Beth Holly one of the most 
difficult to write. 

Analysis of One Man's Family 
indicates an almost total lack of 
plot. Each episode is intended to 
be but a characterization of rou- 
tine events, which might occur in 
the life of any average family. 

Through it all the author has 
tried to inject his own philosophy 
of living. 

Morse was born in Jennings, 
La., in 1901 — without a drop of 
Southern Colonel blood in his 
veins, suh! His forebears were 
Pennsylvania Dutch on his 
mother's side, and English on his 
father's. 

While still a tot his parents left 
the oil fields of Louisiana to set- 

18 



Barbara Jo Allen plays Beth Holly, a 
character about whom you've written 
thousands of letters of praise and con- 
demnation for her marital experiences. 




tie on a large ranch in the Rogue River Valley of Oregon. 
There Morse worked the business end of a milk cow and 
helped with the crops. 

At the end of his 'teens Morse became a newspaper man, 
first in Seattle and then in San Francisco. For ten years 
he pounded beats, wearing holes in his shoes, and pushed a 
pencil on a copy desk, wearing holes in his pants. 

It was the recent financial depression which turned Morse 
to radio. 

Very nearly he wasn't in radio at all, however, for with 
his wallet and stomach both empty a job was offered on 
a Seattle daily. He was then in San Francisco. He made a 
final checkup of bay city studios — having determined to 
try his hand at writing for the air — and landed a job at 
NBC. 

For two years Morse served his apprenticeship. At first 
it was simple blurbs and commercial announcements. Then, 
when KPO called for a series of original half-hour dramas 
he tried his hand. Morse's material was popular. He 
dramatized classic myths, a series of sea stories, ghost yarns, 
and an adventure tale laid in the Mayan jungles. 

Morse is naturally shy — even to his associates. And so 
it was not surprising that after a year of writing blood and 
thunder his quiet nature rebelled. 

One day, even as a harried business man might calm his 

nerves by playing the piano, Morse wrote three chapters 

of a skit that was as much as possible the opposite of what 

he had been writing. He laid the 

sketch away and forgot it, under 

a heap of other manuscripts. 

Several months later two of his 
superiors — no longer among those 
present — called for Morse, told 
him he was "written out," and 
suggested he resign. As a last re- 
sort he showed them his brief 
sketch on family life. They 
laughed — were more certain than 
before that he was "written out." 
Morse appealed for his job to 
Don Gilman, vice-president of 
National Broadcasting Company 
in charge of western division, 
with headquarters in San Fran- 
cisco. Gilman had faith in Morse. 
He told him to stay around — not 
to resign. 

Three months more. Gilman 
asked Morse to expand the story 
to six episodes. The play was 
given a trial. Audience response 
was decisive and gratifying. The 
six episodes became thirteen — the 
first book of One Man's Family, 
to be followed by thirteen more 
and again thirteen. The success 
of the play seemed assured. It 
became, overnight, a western net- 
work feature. 

Later New York asked for the 
play. It became a transcontinen- 
tal sustaining feature. After its 
brief affiliation with its cigarette 
sponsor, aforementioned, the pro- 
gram remained on a nationwide 
sustaining basis until its present 
sponsor bought the rights to the 
play. 

A few words about the parents 
— Henry and Fanny Barbour, 
played by J. Anthony Smythe 
and Minetta Ellen. 

(Continued on page 79) 







IONEL BARRYMORE 



ls,,hcrt Mack 



With Christmas less than a month away, one of the world's most famous villains again will stalk to a microphone 
the afternoon of December 25. Scrooge is coming back, portrayed once more by Lionel Barrymore, whose 
outstanding work in this role last year won him a five-year contract from the makers of Campbell's Soups. 



19 



D 



RIZE 



W, 



F 



INNING FEATURES 




Bert Lawson 



Movies and the stage haven't any mo- 
nopoly on beauty, and to prove it this 
month RADIO MIRROR presents eight of 
radio's most beautiful stars. Each was 
selected for one particular charm. Above, 
Vivienne Segal can well be proud of her 
fine figure. Adele Ronson (in circle) is 
known for her lovely hair. Note how she 
arranges it, simply, yet charmingly, with 
a coronet braid. Below Adele is Lily Pons, 
who in addition to possessing a fine voice 
has a pair of the most expressive hands 
in radio. Right, the Countess Albani, 
popular soprano, is noted for her beauty, 
but we chose her teeth as most beautiful. 



21) 



Bert Lawson 





The movies borrowed glamorous Dor- 
othy Page (left) from radio so that her 
beauty could be seen as well as heard. 
Two good reasons are Dorothy's shapely 
lower extremities. Jane Froman's violet- 
blue eyes struck our fancy. Jane (below) 
uses little make-up to enhance their 
beauty. We've never seen finer arched 
eyebrows than Jane Pickens' (in circle). 
She's soloist and arranger for the Pick- 
ens Sisters Trio. Bottom, Gladys Swarth- 
out's glamor reaches to the tip of her 
nose, which we think is quite perfect. 



D 




RIZE WINNING FEATURES 



: 





Rudolf H. Hoffman 



ILL I AM DALY 

We're proud to present this new candid portrait of William Daly conducting the current Atwater Kent program over 
CBS Thursday evenings — the tenth anniversary of the popular series. His music is also featured Monday nights on 
NBC in the Firestone Concerts. Daly finds time between programs to keep up his study of economy and finance 



22 



I 



DON AMECHE'S 

ROMANCE 



WHEN Don Ameche was fifteen, he met a girl. 
That wasn't unusual. He was a handsome boy, 
with serious dark eyes and a charming diffidence; 
he was always meeting girls, and getting over it. It was 
usually the girls who didn't get over it. 

But this was different. It was while Don — he was Dom- 
inick Felix Ameche then — was attending prep school at 
Columbia Academy, in Dubuque, Iowa. He had plenty of 
serious ideas in those days, but not about girls. So when 
a kindly priest, an instructor at the Academy, introduced 
him to a pretty blonde, Don didn't realize that this was 
something he would never get over. He didn't know then 
that one day he and this same girl would stand before the 
same priest and make a lot of serious promises. To him, 
she was just a girl to be polite to, a girl named Honore 
Prendergast. 

So he smiled, gallantly and devastatingly, although he 
was too young then to realize what that smile of his could 
get him into. And then he promptly forgot the girl. That's 
what he thought. 

Half of his mind did forget her, the half that was busy 
with the natural interests of any fifteen-year-old boy: sail- 
ing, swimming, sport in any form, and last but not least, 
his career. It was not a stage career, the one he dreamed of 
then, but a legal one. Whenever he saw a movie with a 
courtroom scene in it, it was he who pleaded with a hard- 
faced jury. It was he. Dominick Feiix Ameche, who de- 



livered a fiery oration to save a human life. 
He knew that some day he would be a 
great, a well-known lawyer. Which only 
goes to show how wrong people can be 
about themselves. 

With the other half of his mind Don 
never forgot the tall, graceful girl with soft 
yellow curls about her shy, sweet face. 
There was nothing about her which did not 
register itself upon his subconscious mind. 
Even her name was like that of a make- 
believe princess. Honore. It was musical, 
legendary and different 

But young men with legal careers to con- 
quer have no time to dream of make-be- 
lieve princesses. They must devote their 
thoughts to briefing cases and digesting 
heavy law tomes. Don saw Honore several 
times, he doesn't remember how often. Twice, maybe, on 
regular dates, but they weren't sweethearts. They were 
both too busy with school activities. For Honore also 
had chosen a career. She was intensely interested in any- 
thing related to medicine, or nursing, but specifically in 
the study of dietetics. 

When Don graduated from prep school into Columbia 
College at Dubuque, he was well versed in the intricacies 
of Blackstone and other legal authorities. Honore Prender- 
gast? Yes, he knew her, but she was just one of the girls. 
When he left Columbia to transfer to Marquette University, 
Don hoped he'd see her again. She said the same to him; 
she was also leaving Dubuque, to enter Michael Roese 
Hospital in Chicago as a dietician. 

Several years flew by, and Don did a little flying about 
on his own accord, attending Georgetown University for 
one year and finally landing on the gay University of Wis- 
consin campus at Madison. By this time he was beginning 
to wonder vaguely whether a sedate law office was his 
niche in the scheme of things. He had got over his boyish 
diffidence and attained poise; he was a good mixer. Friends 
began to tell him he ought to cash in on his flashing smile 
and genial personality. He laughed, but just for fun he 
decided to try out for campus dramatics. At least it might 
prove a welcome change from the dryness of the law 
library. And it might also lead to a quicker way of making 
a living. A law course is a lengthy (Continued on page 72) 



HE WAS ALWAYS MEETING GIRLS AND 



GETTING OVER THEM— BUT CAME A 



TIME WHEN DON FORGOT TO FORGET 




By CAROLYN 
SOMERS HOYT 



Left, Don and Honore 
Ameche. He has a rival for 
her affections — Dominick 
Felix Ameche, Jr., in circle. 
For Grand Hotel and First 
Nighter, sponsored by 
Campana and starring Don 
Ameche, see page 54, six 
and ten o'clock columns. 

23 




Paramount 



24 



For Sing Crosby's 
program, starting 
December 5, spon- 
sored by Kraft 
Phenix Cheese, see 
page 54 — JO o'clock 
column. Paul White- 
man will switch to 
the Woodbury spot 
eorfy in January. 

LISTEN, Bing! 
This is straight from the shoulder. It wouldn't be 
much of an open letter if it weren't. When I heard 
that you were starting on a new radio show early in De- 
cember I couldn't keep quiet any longer. You'll be reading 
this just before you begin broadcasting again, and that's 
swell, because maybe it will make a difference. 

I almost wrote you last spring, but you went off the air 
for the summer and I let it go. It's still the same subject, 
though, and what has happened this fall makes the facts 
more pertinent. 

I'm going to level some friendly criticism at you — some 
advice and suggestions. Perhaps I can point out some mis- 
takes you don't know you've made. 

Bing, your programs last spring weren't all they should 
have been. Not that your voice wasn't as good as ever. 
It was better, if anything. But still those shows were lack- 
ing in polish, unity, and continuous entertainment. The 
whole tone was too easy going. Even the manner in which 
you sang your songs was lackadaisical. 

Remember those Cremo Cigar programs? You were still 
learning then and you were trying. We who listened knew 
it and we went for you all the way. It's only recently that 
we've begun to wonder. Were you trying last spring, Bing? 
I doubt it. 

On your final broadcast (it was in May, wasn't it?) I'd 
have sworn you were singing from the studio in your To- 
luca Lake home and that Georgie Stoll's orchestra was in 
the regular studio downtown. And Bing, when an amateur 
in music like myself can detect such a fault, it's a cinch 
thousands of other listeners caught the same defect. 

I'd have waited and told you some time in person only 
I believe that your fans are feeling the same way and I'd 
like to hope that I'm speaking for them as well as myself. 
We're all rooting for you, every last one of us, and you 
and your sponsor know it, or you wouldn't have been signed 
on this new contract. 

But Bing, do you know this? You're on the spot. I'll 
tell you why .December 5th, you take the place of the man 
who really gave you your start. You're going to work for 
the makers of the cheese that Paul Whiteman has glorified 
for so long so successfully. And that's why you're on the 
spot. 

You're taking over, and everyone, especially your spon- 
sors past and present, will be watching to see if your show 
can rise to the high-water mark of popularity left by Paul's 




YOU NEED SOME STRAIGHT FROM 



THE SHOULDER CRITICISM AND 



FRIENDLY ADVICE— HERE IT IS 




-. 



/ 




program, which has been one of Thursday night's highlights 

There's another good reason you're on this spot. As you 
know, Paul starts his new series of shows early in January 
— for the same sponsor you had last spring. Thai's what 
makes it really tough. If Paul does better for the soap 
manufacturer you used to work for than you did, there'll 
be a lot of head shaking. 

What I'm really getting at is tnis: when a man is given 
a job to do, it's human nature to expect he'll do his best. 
You've been given the job of entertaining a vast radio 
audience. Give it everything, Bing. I know that life has 
suddenly become one prolonged song for you. With a swell 
home and those wonderful kids and a picture contract that 
would make the president jealous, there's nothing left for 
you to want except one thing. 

That one thing is to keep faith with the public that gave 
you the chance to have the swell home and kids. You've 
talked of retiring. I don't think you will for quite a while 
yet and I can think of one good reason why you shouldn't. 
There's no one to take your place. It would be different if 
you could just step down and nominate somebody else to 
fill your boots. As long as you can't and as long as your 
voice is better than ever, you've got to keep going. 

So when you start your first show in December, remem- 
ber that it takes more than a good voice to make it a suc- 
cess. It takes what your shows once had — The Crosby per- 
sonality every minute. 

You'll have the orchestra you want to go with that voice 
and that personality. It's a good one, I know that. I've 
danced to it and I've heard it on the air. Jimmy Dorsey is 
an old friend of yours, too, isn't he? 

If you read this while you're still rehearsing for that 
opening broadcast, remember what I've been trying to tell 
you. Remember that you're on the spot, that there are 
plenty of people waiting like hungry wolves for the first 
sign of weakness. And remember too the goal you have to 
shoot for — the goal set by your former mentor, Paul White- 
man. 

I guess that's all. Bing, and here's hoping. 



*v 



For Nino Mar- 
tint's program 
sponsored by 
Chesterfield, 
see page 51—9 
o'clock column. 



MM 





^J^fm^ a * 



vsm* 



YOU sit before your loud speaker or settle back in the 
dark theater and hear the starting thunder of ap- 
plause as the fine clear voice of Nino Martini dies 
away on the last notes of a great aria. 

And you envy this singing star of the Chesterfield pro- 
gram, this romantic tenor of the new Fox Film, "Here's to 

26 



Romance." You envy him the money, the acclaim, above 
all the satisfaction, that must come to the possessor of such 
a great gift. 

But did you ever stop to think of the other side of such 
a career, of the countless little homely pleasures lost for- 
ever, of the unending hours of self-denial, of the heartache 
that dimmed even the glory of his great hour of triumph? 

Behind the easy, gracious smile of the singer and the 



actor there is a Nino Martini you do not know, mei 
without flinching, without complaining, the demands which 
his career ha.s made of him. When you have heard this 
story of what his career has cost him, perhaps envy will 
give way to sympathy. 

Let us forget for the moment then the Martini ot today, 
piling triumph upon triumph in radio, movies, opera, and 
turn back the clock to the days when he was a happy-go- 
lucky school boy in the little northern Italian cm 
Verona. 

There was not much money in the Martini household. 
Nino's father had died when he was very young. Yet Nino 
and his sisters were getting the best education that Verona 
could afford. His mother, Nina, for whom he was named, 
had seen to that — toiling without sparing herself, continu- 
ing her husband's job as custodian of the tomb of Romeo 
and Juliet, working beautiful hand stitching on dresses for 
a few extra pennies. 

Nino had but one objective in life — to get the money that 
would lift this burden from his mother's shoulders. Though 
there was burning in him more than a boy's usual share oi 
love for sports and parties, he was ready to sei/.e the first 
steady job he could find. 

ALL this time he did sing, of course. But only in church 
^^ choirs. Most Italian boys did that. And he sang at 
parties. That was all right, too, for it was the custom 
But whenever Nino was asked to sing alone, without the 
accompaniment his friends usually provided, he would 
shake his head in embarrassment. 

"Singing," he would reply, "is silly." 

Then at one of these parties, the secretary to Maria Gay 
and Giovanni Zenatello, the renowned voice coaches, heard 
him. And in that moment his whole future was changed. 

She told her employers about him. The Zenatellos sent 
for him, heard him sing. There followed a solemn con- 
ference. "My boy," said Signor Giovanni, "you have a 
very wonderful gift. I have behind me twenty-nine years 
in the profession. I am willing to gamble it all on you, to 
make your career my career. You understand, of course, 
that it will mean sacrifices on my part of time and money. 
1 shall ask you to make equal sacrifices, if you decide you 
want a career. It will be a partnership, you and I to- 
gether." 

He outlined frankly to Nino what he would have to 
give up. But he also pointed out to him the com- 
pensating joy and satisfaction of 
being the possessor 



ol the great, well-trained mii^mi- voia thai could !>• 

"You must dedicate yourself to your voice Ml else must 
come after. It is up to you to choose.' 

That night Nino made up his mind 

The next morning, along with the lirsi sweet taste <>'■ 
anticipation, he knew also the bitterness of sacrifice sacri- 
fice that he finally made only because his mothei insisted 
He heard the /.enatellos explain that Nino must come to 
live with them so that they could better supervise his train- 
ing, that he must not plan to do any other work. 

lie heard his mother say to Madam Zenatello with tears 
in her eves. "It is only to you that I could let Nino go I 
know you will be a second mother to him " 

/% \l) he kit an added sadness at knowing that it would 
^^ be years now instead of weeks, before he could be ol 
help in assuming the family responsibilities 

There began then a rigorous career oi self-denial and 
discipline which has grown Steadily more severe as Martini 
has mounted in the artistic world The caret ree lite of the 
young man about town was ended. No more singing in the 
streets. No more smoking. No more jolly parti' 

Perhaps the hardest thing that Nino had to learn was 
to take care of himself. I he young madcap, who had been 
expelled from sch(X)l because of his pranks, who had been 
accustomed to risking life and limb at his sport, had to 
learn to care for himself like a baby. He could not take 
cold. He could not overeat or keep late hours, for over- 
indulgence was sure to show up in his voi 

The Zenatellos were sympathetic. They knew they wen 
dealing with a gay yet sensitive temperament, one to whom 
the monastic life did not come naturally, but who, lelt to 
his own devices, would have been a sport, a good fellow. 
Rarely, they said, had they ever met anyone so filled with 
a /est for living. Their job, then, was to guide this en- 
thusiasm for the experiences of life into new channels with- 
out crushing it. 

They took him to the theater, to the opera, the best en- 
tertainment that Verona had to offer They acquainted 
him with the best in literature. Bit by bit they awakened 
his interest in these things, showed him their importance 

And before him he had a living example 
Hadn't the Zenatellos (Contin- 
ued on page 76) 



ua rN 



\*/HA T 



ARE £R 



COST 



GRE* 1 
-THE 



ACHE 
GtORV 



1HA" 1 
f H*S 



1H»S 

DIMMED 
HOUR of 



STAR'S 
HEAR" 1 " 



E VEH 



TRl 



THE 
U^PH 



By 

NORT°* 
RUSSELL 



v/WAe N'"° ma Wnq 
Ho\W* ood fo * film. 
Ms " e Vio *°- 

0,0 n ;-,tu\ * s *. 

A»vr/nottn 




ANOTHER GRAND ARTICLE BY CURTIS MITCHELL, SPARKLING IN ITS INTIMATE 



KNOWLEDGE OF THE RADIO WORLD 



THIS month I want to tell you about some of the radio 
marriages I've encountered, some of the gossip that 
has been spread about them and how these couples 
have risen above it, to know even greater happiness as their 
careers have prospered or waned. ' 

Let's start with Ruth Etting and the dynamic, bizarre 
fellow she married, called Colonel Snyder. Ruth is still the 
girl who came out of Nebraska's tall corn country ten 
years ago to conquer the world. In Chicago, she first 
learned that sweetness arid integrity and a golden voice 
were not quite enough to combat the dangers of the frayed- 
edged world of the cabaret into which she had stumbled. 

In Chicago, she met Snyder. No one knows the story of 
their romance except Ruth and her husband. No one — 
except Walter Winchell — has ever printed any stories 
about him because he has forbidden it. Walter Winchell is 
a friend of the family. 

On Broadway or in Hollywood, Colonel Snyder is a 
fabulous figure. Tremendously energetic, fearless, rough 
and direct in voice and manner, as tough as they come when 
the need arises for toughness, he lives and breathes for Ruth 
Etting. He found her — and she found him — when she 
needed him back there in the Chicago cellar cabarets. He 
has fought for her with show producers, with radio pro- 
ducers, with motion picture makers. Watchdog over the 
rights he considers hers, he challenges anyone who doesn't 
accord her the full measure of her star's estate. I met him 
in this roundabout fashion. 

Ruth Etting was making her first appearance in a New 
York theater. Spotlighted on the stage of the tremendous 
5,000 seat theater, she looked like an angel. Her singing 



SECRETS 
AtftftlT 




already gave promise of the great career she was to find 
within another year.. 1 went to the manager of the theater 
who was also my close friend and said, "I want to meet 
that girl. Take me back and introduce me." 

"Not on your life," he told me. "She has a husband no- 
body plays with." 

That was that. 

Almost five years later, during which time Ruth had 
become a top-flight singer and had been starred in movies 
and musical comedies, I had to write a story about her. 
People who had worked with her on radio programs told 
me, "Watch out for her husband. He's a watchdog you 
can't trifle with." 




FOR THE FIRST TIME 



Left, below, fisherman Jeannie Lang 
said Arthur Lang was her brother. 
Next, fisherman Ruth Etting's hus- 
band has never been described. 
Little Jack Little who had a hid- 
den business manager. Right, the 
Jack Bennys who have their own 
secret. Right, below, Annette Han- 
shaw whose relationship with her 
manager has never been disclosed. 

Wide World 




"hey lived — and they still live — in a 
modest two-room suite in New York's Pic- 
cadilly Hotel. I knocked on their door. 

A short man, in his thirties, reached out 
a hand that grabbed mine like a vice. "Hi! 
Come right in." In the next hour and thirty minutes, I" 
learned about hospitality from the man whom nine out of 
ten Broadwayites fear. Colonel Snyder. When I left, he 
loaded me down with an autographed photo of Ruth, a car- 
ton of cigarettes (remember when she was on the Chester- 
field program?), a pint of very rare old whiskey (this was 
during Prohibition, too) and a gleaming necktie from a 
Fifth Avenue haberdashery. 

It has been something like that every time I have seen 
them. Ruth sits there, poised and sweet and sure of her- 
self; while he bounces around talking, showing you things, 
shooting sparks with his incredibly fast mind. 

What about his reputed ability with his fists or any other 
weapon handy? His rough stuff tactics here and there 
around the town? I've never seen any of either, but lots of 
things happen I don't see. If he has used a roundhouse right 
or an uppercut to gain his ends, it's all right with me. Be- 
cause he's doing it for a Cause, a Cause he's been support- 
ing for ten years, a Cause with deep blue eyes that answers 
to the name of Ruth. 

You've never read about him before because he insists 
violently that he be kept out of the picture. Ruth Etting 
is the name to print in the headlines. Hers is the picture 
to take. This word picture won't please him at all. I'm 
sure of that. But it will please even less those radio gos- 
sips who say radio marriages can't last. 

M'M not so well acquainted with Jack Benny and Mary 
Livingstone but I do know something about Jack that 
shows clearly enough, I think, the sort of man he is, and 
why his marriage has always been the happiest I've ever 
encountered. 

This story starts with Harry Conn, his writer. Think 
back to the days when Broadway's top-hole comedians were 
just coming on the air. 

Jack's two-room apartment in a New York hotel was the 
scene of a bitter discussion. Jack had signed a contract to 
do thirteen weekly shows for a radio sponsor. Harry Conn, 
the writer, was there. So was I. jack declared with finality, 



"It can't be done. There just aren't enough gags in the 
world to keep feeding out new ones every week. 1 wish I'd 
never signed up." 

You know, of course, what happened. The shows were 
good, so good, indeed, that Jack Benny's programs have 
made him a greater star than he ever dreamed he'd be. 
But the story I want to tell is t It i> 

Jack Benny paid Harry $100 for each of those firsl 
scripts. Then, as his own salary increased, he added to 
Harry's pay check. It progressed from $250. to $500. to 
$750. Just before they went to Hollywood last year, Harry 
told me he was getting $1,200 for each script. No other 
writer in radio was getting anything like that figure. You 
might think Jack would figure he was doing all right by 
his script writer. But what he did next is typical of him. 

Hollywood offered him a contract, wanted him badly for 
a picture. Jack agreed to sign on one condition; on the 
condition that Harry Conn be employed to write all his 
dialogue in the movie at a salary of 81.800 a week. And 
that's the way the contract read when Jack and Harry and 
Mary went to Hollywood. 

All this leads to the point that (Continued mi page 70) 



HUSHED WEDDINGS AND MANY OTHER STARTLING FACTS ARE REVEALED 



m 



ALL YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT YOUR DAWN-TO-MIDNIGHT FAVORITES 




HARV'S 
ESTHER 



Left above, Phil Baker's newest stooge, pert little 
Emily Vaas, sasses her boss. Thirteen, she's the baby 
of radio's Vaas Family, got the job with Phil because 
he liked her hat . . . Above, Audrey Marsh, who 
plays Esther on the Harv and Esther program. Born 
in New York, she began her career on the stage, 
playing Rosemary in "Abie's Irish Rose." Never 
thought she was a singer, but CBS did when she took 
an audition . . . Left, Dorothy Lamour, the "Dreamer 
of Songs" over NBC three times a week at 1 1 :00 
p.m. She was born in New Orleans and won popu- 
larity in the South before coming to New York. She's 
not married . . . Jacques Fray (below), has turned or- 
chestra leader since his split with partner Mario 
Braggiotti. He's on NBC Sundays at 6:00. Paris- 
born, he studied banking, preferred music instead. 



DREAMER OF SONGS 



PIANIST-CONDUCTOR 



BROUGHT YOU IN PICTURES AND STORIES 




THE NORSEMEN AND PIANIST 



Above, NBC's Four Norsemen — Kenneth Schon, Al Revere, Ed Lind- 
strom, and Ted Kline, with James Peterson, accompanist and ar- 
ranger, holding the match. All graduated from the University of 
Minnesota music school, formed a quartet when none could get solo 
singing jobs . . . Right, New York's youngest producer, 32-year-old 
Ted Hammerstein. On the air he runs his own show, the Music 
Hall, NBC, Mondays at 8:00. He's Oscar Hammerstein's grandson 
. . . Below, right, Carmela Ponselle, star of Columbia's "Broadway 
Varieties," sang in choirs and cabarets with sister Rosa on the way 
to opera. Has brown hair and eyes, was educated in a convent, 
and is unmarried . . . Below, the source of the cowboy ballads on 
Show Boat. The Westerners are Harry Wellington, Dott Massy, Milt 
Mabie, Louise Massey, and Allen Massey. All except Larry, who's 
a Californian, born in New Mexico, where they own a ranch. 
Dott and Milt write most of the original songs. Louise 
Massey will soon have a script romance with Lanny Ross. 



THE 




MUSIC HALL 




GRAND 



OPERA STAR 



SINGERS, COMEDIANS AND MUSICIANS— YOU MEET THE WHOLE COLOR- 



Left, Roberta Semple, who doesn't let the fact that she's 
Aimee Semple Macpherson's daughter stop her from 
carving out her own career via radio. She produces two 
shows over a Los Angeles station . . . Left below, the 
mistress of ceremonies on CBS's Women's Page, Tues- 
days at 3:00. A minister's daughter, Lois Long gradu- 
ated from Vassar, worked for Vogue and other maga- 
zines, is noted for her witty and honest fashion notes . . . 
Below, Jack Arthur, who plays Harv to Audrey Marsh's 
Esther. Ran away from school to join the Canadian 
army, spent three years in Flanders. Tall, dark, and a 
bachelor. Never takes a vacation longer than one day 
. . . Left corner, Mrs. 5-Star Jones — otherwise, Elizabeth 
Day. Born in St. Paul, loved to act as a child, and started 
her career on the stage . . . Right corner, one amateur 
show winner who's tops now. Doris Wester stepped from 
Major Bowes' program last July to the Rainbow Room, 
swanky New York night-club. A Chicagoan, and 
unmarried. She came to New York a few years ago. 





WINNER DORIS WESTER 



FUL CARAVAN OF RADIO IN THESE PAGES. 




Above, Vic Irwin, whose orchestra provides the music for "Popeye 
the Sailor" over NBC, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays at 
7:15. Returned to New York from Hollywood to take over the 
job . . . Right, Bobby Meeker, who supplies listeners of WGY, 
Schenectady, with fine dance tunes. He graduated from the 
University of Chicago and has played in hotels in many large 
U. S. cities . . . Below, Ted Black, another WGY dance maestro. 
A youthful case of measles started his musical career — his father 
gave him a harmonica to keep him amused in bed. Taught him- 
self all he knows about music . . . Below right, Frances Adair, who 
sings about "Moon Over Manhattan" Sunday mornings at I 1:00 
over NBC. Left her native Chicago to sing in vaudeville, George 
White's "Scandals," and movie shorts. Tall and willowy, she has 
blue-gray eyes and light brown hair and is still unmarried. 




DANCE MAESTRO TED BLACK 




1* 



V 



^j 



FRANCES ADAIR 




HOUSEWIFE AT 40 




OPPORTUNITY?" 
Kate McComb's blue eyes 
snapped. 

''Opportunity is everywhere. Insur- 
mountable handicaps? They don't exist!" 

The gallant, gray-haired lady whom you 
know better as lovable Ma O'Neill of the 
radio family of O'Neill's, indicated her 
trim, homey "bachelor" hotel-apartment 
with an expressive gesture. 

"Living as I do," she smiled, "any house- 
wife would say, and justly, that it is easy 
for. me to have a career. No meals to plan, 
no house to run. my son grown up. My 
time is my own. 

"But don't forget this: I wouldn't have 
any career today if I hadn't worked at it 
when I did have a house to run, a family to 
look after. 

"Handicaps? I've known them all. Ill- 
ness, isolation, responsibilities. There isn't 
one of them that can't be licked, if it means 
enough to you. 

"So' many people seem to think that op- 
portunity is always somewhere else — -in 
New York or Hollywood. Opportunity is 
where you are — in your own church or 
school or club. Do the thing nearest at 
hand, that's the answer." 

She laughed. "I wouldn't dare lay down 
the law like that if I didn't know. Remem- 
ber, I was forty-four when I became a 
Broadway star. For twenty-four years I 
had done the thing nearest at hand without 
the slightest prospect of professional re- 
ward or recognition. 

"But when 1 was able to devote all my time to a career. 
I was ready. I knew my job. I found to my surprise that 
I knew it better than many who had spent a lifetime in the 
theater 

"You've no idea how much it means to me now when 
my other interests are over and I'm afraid I'd find life 
rather empty without my work. There is a very special 
reason in my case why I'm thankful I never gave up, a 
reason I'll tell you later. 

"It can be done. Only you've got to work — work end- 
lessly. And you've got to want to so much it hurts." 

K* EW people have had a more promising start in life than 
Kate McComb. Her heart was set on becoming a concert 
pianist, and everything seemed to favor her. She had 
talent, the best of teachers, money to travel. Above all. 
she had ambition. No hours of practice were too long, no 
pains too great for her to take. 

Then when she was seventeen and just beginning to enjoy 
the first fruits of her long years of preparation, she fell 
ill with pneumonia. For many months she was very sick 
indeed 

One day the doctor found her practicing again. "Kate," 
he said gently, "this won't do. You might as well know 
now. You must give up all thoughts of a career. Your 
health won't stand it." 

For a moment she was silent, stunned. Then she said. 
"But I can t sit around with my hands.in my lap. I'm not 
used to it. Isn't there anything 1 can do? Can't I act? 
( )r sing?" 




"Sing?" he answered. "Of course you can sing. That 1' 
be the finest thing in the world for you " 

So Kate, undaunted, started out from scratch in a new 
direction. Again she showed promise in this new field ami 
presently a whole fresh horizon was opened up to hei 

A few years later she fell in love, and before long she 
was married to John McComb 

But marriage offered no obstacle to her career. Her hu^ 
band was sympathetic. They would continue living in New 
York where she could go on with her studies. 

Then, just three months after her marriage, John Mc- 
Comb was stricken with cerebral meningitis. When he 
was out of danger, the doctor put the question of his fu- 
ture squarely up to her 

He could stay on in New York and he might be able 
to continue with his business without any great danger 
But his chances for eventual recovery would be much 
greater if he were to move to t.he count r\ 

Move to the country! It would mean the end of al! 
hopes for her career. But she did not hesitate. She was 
glad enough to make that sacrifice for the man she loved. 

Within a few days she had removed her household to the 
little town of Great Barrington, high up in the blue Berk- 
shire Hills of western Massachusetts, dedicating herself to 
the task of winning her husband's health 

In the years that followed she had more than her share 
of responsibilities. Although her husband was not entirely 
an invalid, where he had once looked after her, it was now 
her job to look after him. There was also her mother to 
care for. And presently there was her son. Malcolm 



STAR AT 44/ 




By JOHN SEYMOUR 



FOR KATE McCOMB, LIFE 



HAD HELD ONLY ILLNESS 



AND DRUDGERY— YET ALL 



HER DREAMS CAME TRUE 



For the O'Neills, sponsored by Ivory Soap, 
turn to page 52 — 3 o'clock column. 



It seemed almost impossible, un- 
der such circumstances, to find the 
time, the energy and the enthusiasm 
to continue with her career. And yet 
she did continue. 

'THERE were no opportunities, either, 
when she first came to Great Bar- 
rmgton. Opportunities? She made her 
own opportunities. She got up concerts 
and bazaars and vaudeville programs. 
She staged plays for church and com- 
munity organizations, sold the tickets, 
built the props, coached the cast, acted 
and sang. 

"I'd walk down the street," she said, 
"I'd point a finger at someone I knew and 
call out 'You're surely coming tonight!' 
And they'd come. Enthusiasm — that's 
what does it. People finally got so they'd 
come to a show because if Kate McComb 
was connected with it, they knew it would 
be a good job. 

"Work? I worked when I was so dog-tired I couldn't 
see straight. I knew what it was to create moonlight in 
half an hour before show time by stretching a piece of 
blue oleo over an electric bulb, sticking it up on a step- 
ladder and covering it with a piece of rag carpet. 

"I knew what it was to take a chorus of people who 
couldn't sing and pound singing into them. 

"I knew what it was to drive alone at night in a sleigh 




to coach an orchestra at a boys' 
school. 

"I did everything — coaching, 
producing, acting, singing. I 
couldn't help myself. There was 
always that hunger driving me 
on. 

"Besides my life was also the 
life of (Continued on page 49) 



You know gallant 
Kate McComb as 
the wise mother 
of the famous 
O'Neill family. 
Upper left, her 
newest portrait; 
next, in character; 
and above, the cast 
at a rehearsal. 




WILL WAR GUMS 




No statements made in these articles on the amazing part 
radio will play in the event of war, Ethiopian or otherwise, 
is intended to reflect upon the courage or honor of any na- 
tion, broadcasting organisation or individual. Much of this 
hitherto unrevealed information is based cm statements 
made privately by officials on the inside of governmental 
and military affairs, who were endeavoring to cooperate 
with the author in creating as complete a picture as possible 
for the good of our citizens. The names of the nations are 
used only to make the picture clearer to the reader, not to 
suggest that they would necessarily undertake actions as- 
cribed to them here. — Editor. 

ONE cold gray day in December, 1930, the U. S. Sub- 
marine 0-8 thrust her dripping snout up through 
the surface of the Atlantic after completing one of 
the most thrilling broadcasts the world had known up to 
that time. 

As an eye-witness of that broadcast, 1 too had been 
thrilled, but I suspected no more than did the NBC repre- 
sentatives or the naval officers present, that some day, in 
time of war, such broadcasts might be made by some na- 
tion, not in a holiday experimental manner, but with a 
grimness designed to chill the hearts of listeners in an 
enemy country. 



Suppose the spectre of war should suddenly darken thi^ 
whole fevered world. How would such broadcasts be car- 
ried out? What other means would warring nations take 
to destroy the morale of an enemy nation? What would it 
mean to you and what could our government do to stop 
them the moment they threatened our own peace and safety"' 
You doubtless hope with the rest of us that such things 
will never be necessary, yet whether or not you believe in 
military and naval preparedness, these are things which 
will create emergencies for which you should be ready. 

Assume that this nation were facing a grim submarine 
blockade as it did in the last war. These menacing sub-sea 
craft might be carrying, not only the latest in torpedo-firing 
equipment, but a small modern broadcasting station, de- 
signed to send us messages on wavelengths on which we us- 
ually listen. 

Do you remember the warning which the German Im- 
perial government published in the newspapers of this 
country in 1915? There was no such thing as broadcasting 
then. But let's let history do its own repeating. 

You are seated at your set, nervously twisting the dials, 
knowing that you will pick up some ominous message from 
the blockade designed to strike at your morale, hoping all 
the time that you won't. Suddenly you cut in on a voice 
speaking in hard, clipped tones. 



CONCLUDING THIS AMAZING FORECAST OF WHAT MAY HAPPEN TO 




A lost ship. A black 
hull breaks water — an 
enemy submarine. Sud- 
denly you hear on your 
radio this warning: 
"We are about to sink 
the S. S. Masterson." 



SILENCE RADIO ? 




BY JEAN 
m PELLETIER 



ILLUSTRATED 



b y 



CARL 



LINK 



"... and despite our repeated warnings to the United 
States, a munitions-bearing ship is at this moment attempt- 
ing to run our blockade. We are approaching the S. S. 
Masterson which has been separated from her convoy. We 
have no recourse but to sink her for not having heeded our 
warning. We hope that the citizens of your nation will 
realize how futile it is to carry on the war in the face of 
our blockade. In the interest of humanity and our own 
self-preservation, we urge you to organize for an imme- 
diate peace settlement." 

You snap off your loudspeaker and rise in anger. Fight- 
ing words? Certainly they are. Give those fellows a taste 
of their own medicine. But after the third and the fifth and 
seventh broadcasts of this kind have come to you, you'll 
begin to wonder, for by then you'll know too well what 
has been happening out there on the ocean. That sub- 
marine broadcasting set will have brought grim descriptions 
to your home. 

Picture it. A fleet of munitions and troopships so camou- 
flaged they might have been painted by drunken sailors. 
Proud destroyers and fast cruisers form the convoy. A 
heavy fog at night, and a ship loses its protectors. A re- 
lentless dawn finds it alone in the Atlantic. 

On the bridge of the vessel, officers, red-eyed from worry 
and lack of sleep, pace the bridge, straining to see any 



slight wake in the waves which might indicate a periscope. 
A sudden hail from the crows nest. 

"Submarine two points off the starboard bow, sir!" . 

The bridge is startled into activity. The captain bellows 
to the quartermaster. 

"Full astern! Hard aport!" 

The ship trembles under the sudden change in way and 
course. The captain curses as he watches the submarine's 
conning-tower break water, as he sees its black hull shake the 
water from its back. The sub-sea vessel's conning-tower 
hatch swings open and officers and men pour from it. A 
gun rises through the forward deck of the craft as a warn- 
ing. A hail floats across the water. 

"Abandon ship within three minutes. We're going to 
sink you." 

The ship's captain can't fight back. The safety of his 
officers and men means more than the thousands of dollars 
invested in the ship and its cargo. Hoarse orders hurtle 
about the doomed vessel. Davits swing out and lifeboats, 
crowded with men, are hastily lowered into the unfriendly 
sea. 

Five minutes later, the abandoned ship is as helpless as 
a cow about to be butchered. Suddenly a white streak 
lengthens rapidly from the submarine in the direction of 
the rolling vessel. There's a terrific (Continued on page 58) 



RADIO IF THE WORLD SHOULD PLUNGE INTO ANOTHER CONFLICT! 



37 




A lost ship. A block 
hull breaks water — an 
enemy submarine. Sud- 
denly you hear on your 
radio this warning: 
"We are about to sink 
the S. S. Masterson." 



WILL WAR GUNS SILENCE RADIO ? 




■H 



"?0t^* 




BY JEAN 
PELLETIER 



No statements made in these articles on the amazing part 
radio will play in the event oj war, Ethiopian or otherwise. 
is intended to reflect upon the courage or honor oj any na- 
tion, broadcasting organisation or individual. Much of this 
hitherto unrevealed information is based on statements 
made privately by officials on the inside of governmental 
and military affairs, who were endeavoring to cooperate 
with the author in , idling as complete a picture as possible 
/or the good of our citizens. The names of the nations are 
used only to make the picture clearer to the reader, not to 
mggesi that they would necessarily undertake actions as- 
cribed to them here. — Editoi 

ONE cold gray day in December, l»)o, the U. S. Sub- 
marine 0-8 thrust her dripping snout up through 
the surface of the Atlantic after completing one of 
the most thrilling broadcasts the world had known up to 
thai time. 

As an eye-witness oi that broadcast. 1 too had been 
thrilled, but I suspected no more than did the NBC repre- 
entative oi the naval officers present, that some day in 
timi ol war, such broadcasts might be made by some na- 
tion, not m a holiday experimental manner, bul with a 
grimness designed In chill the hearts of hsleners in an 
enemy country. 



Suppose the spectre of war should suddenly darken this 
whole fevered world. How would such broadcasts be car- 
ried out? What other means would warring nations take 
to destroy the morale of an enemy nation? What would it 
mean to you and what could our government do to stop 
them the moment they threatened our own peace and safety r 

You doubtless hope with the rest of us that such things 
will never be necessary, yet whether or not you believe in 
military and naval preparedness, these are things which 
will create emergencies for which you should be read) 

Assume that this nation were facing a grim submarine 
blockade as it did in the last war. These menacing sub-sea 
craft might be carrying, not only the latest in torpedo-finng 
equipment, but a small modern broadcasting station, de- 
signed to send us messages on wavelengths on which we us- 
ually listen 

Do you remember the warning which the German Im- 
perial government published in the newspapers of this 
country in 1915? There was no such thing as broadcasting 
then. But let's let history do its own repeating. 

You are seated at your set, nervously twisting the dials, 
knowing that you will pick up some ominous message from 
the blockade designed to strike at your morale, hoping all 
the time that you won't. Suddenly you cut in on a voice 
speaking in hard, clipped tones. 



CONCLUDING THIS AMAZING FORECAST OF WHAT MAY HAPPEN TO 



ILLUSTRATED 



b y 



CARL 



LINK 



... and despite our repeated warnings to the United 
States, a munitions-bearing ship is at this moment attempt- 
ing to run our blockade. We are approaching the S. S. 
Masterson which has been separated from her convoy. We 
have no recourse but to sink her for not having heeded our 
warning. We hope that the citizens of your nation will 
realize how futile it is to carry on the war in the face of 
our blockade. In the interest of humanity and our own 
self-preservation, we urge you to organize for an imme- 
diate peace settlement." 

, You snap off your loudspeaker and rise in anger. Fight- 
"Jg words? Certainly they are. Give those fellows a taste 
° f their own medicine. But after the third and the fifth and 
seventh broadcasts of this kind have come to you, you'll 
wgin to wonder, for by -then you'll know too well what 
"as been happening out there on the ocean. That sub- 
marine broadcasting set will have brought grim descriptions 
t0 your home 

Picture it. A fleet of munitions and troopships so camou- 
p ged th ey might have been painted by drunken sailors. 
™ud destroyers and fast cruisers form the convoy. A 
neavy f 0g at njgnt and a shjp , oses its prot ectors. A re- 
stless dawn finds it alone in the Atlantic, 
anni bridge of the vessel . oncers, red-eyed from worry 
nd 'ack of sleep, pace the bridge, straining to see any 



slight wake in the waves which might indicate a periscope. 
A sudden hail from the crows nest. 

"Submarine two points off the starboard bow, sir! 

The bridge is startled into activity. The captain bellows 
to the quartermaster. 

"Full astern! Hard aport!" 

The ship trembles under the sudden change in way and 
course The captain curses as he watches the submarines 
conn n-tower break water, as he sees its black hull shake the 
water "from its back. The sub-sea vessels conning-tower 
hatch swings open and officers and men pour from it. A 
gun rise! through the forward deck of the craft as a warn- 
ing A hail floats across the water. . 

"Abandon ship within three minutes. Were going to 

Sin The°ship's captain can't fight back. The safety of his 
I ne snip K more than the thousands of dollars 

officers and men means mo r tna ^^ ^ 

mvested I in the shipand its c g 
lSS%^t,ZtX^J^ the untnendU 

SM C - ™in„tes later the abandoned ship is as helpless as 

F Zut to be butchered. Suddenly a white streak 

a cow about to c e rr u direction ol 

BSSffS^Sfc (Continued on page „ 



and l , uge 0I tfte vesse1 ' onicers, rea-eyeu uu... «— , ~ ... I here s a ■«■»«. \*-» ■"-. ~, 

9nd 'ack of sleep, pace the bridge, straining to see any the rollin„ ve 

*M0 IF THE WORLD SHOULD PLUNGE INTO ANOTHER CONFLICT! 



$ 





m 



»kS 






**^ 



■ 



: M 




H\D a fiction writer created this tale of Lucy Monroe, 
young soprano singing on Ted Hammerstein's 
Music Hall of the Air, he would be paid only in 
the sneers of editors. Engaging though this story is, it is 
too full of confidence to live anywhere hut in the world 
of truth'. 

Thirty years ago, November 5th, 1905, to be exact, the 
following advertisement appeared in New York newspapers. 

"Hammerstein's Victoria Music Hall (25-50-75-1.00) — 
smoking at all performances. 

"First time in vaudeville, Anna Laughlin, late of 'The 
Wizard of Oz.' " 

That theater was owned and operated by Oscar Ham- 
merstein, grandfather of the Ted Hammerstein you hear 
every Monday evening. The Anna Laughfin is the mother 
of the Lucy Monroe you hear singing on that program. 

Will Rogers was billed on the 1905 show as an "expert 
iariat thrower." Oscar Hammerstein too is gone, and his 
theater has disappeared from Broadway. 

But Anna Laughlin lives on to hear the radio triumph 
of her daughter Lucy. 

* * * 

TPHF hot music of which we recently wrote is holding 
* its own. You may have heard the broadcast of the Eddy- 
Reilly orchestra, and you may hear it again. This is the 
band which plays at Manhattan's Onyx Club, hangout of 
many of radio's bandsmen. There's a band which really 
has to be good, playing as it does to so many critical ears. 
Another steam-heater you may hear on the air from 
time to time is the one conducted by Red Norvb, which 
plays at another New York night spot, the Famous Door. 
Red slaps the xylophone around, while the others burn up 
instruments which include string bass, clarinet, guitar, 
tenor saxophone and trumpet. 
38 



Norvo is the husband of Mildred Bailey, radio's "rocking 

chair" singer, and former protegee of Paul Whiteman. 

* * * 

SO THEY SAY 

r W'HE musicians call such orchestras made up of blast 
furnace boys, "jam bands." 
All the slang of these instrumentalists is equally colorful. 
"Swing" denotes music which 'arouses dancers" to some sort 
or rhythmic frenzy. A clarinet is called a "globe stick;" a 
harp an "Irish zither;" a saxophone a "button hook;" and 
a bass viol a "dark house." The term of endearment or 
condemnation for a conductor, depending on the mood of 

the musician, is "professor" or "massa." 

* * * 

And it was Massa Ray Noble who, in describing to his 
orchestra the manner in which he wanted "The Night Was 
Made for Love" played, said: 

"This number is a mike crawler, and I want everyone to 
sluice it like treacle." 

Translation next month, along with more musicians' 
slang. 

/% FTER rather unsuccessful first attempts in the talkies. 
^* Rudy Vallee finally made one that was well received. 
Hence, he is now engaged in making another. This time, 
he's doing his posing and playing in the East. Here in New 
York State, the courts have protected him from further 
suits by Fay Webb. In California, the property law* are 
said to leave openings for suits against him by Miss Webb, 

were he to go to Hollywood. 

* * * 

YOUR PAL HAL 

A number of readers have displayed a not inexcusable 
curiosity as to exactly what (Continued on page 63) 




With JOHN SKINNER 
UP-TO-THE-MINUTE NEWS, INSIDE 
FACTS AND INTERESTING CHATTER 



ABOUT YOUR FAVORITE MUSICIANS 



At the top is the 
Hal Kemp band, 
showing you its 
musical set-up with 
Hal at the left. 



Lucy Monroe (right) 
sings on Ted Ham- 
merstein's Music 
Hall of the Air. Her 
mother once starred 
for Ted's granddad. 
The other girl is 
Bernice Claire, 
photographed just 
after picture-mak- 
ing in England. 




WHAT THIS GRAND NEW 
DEPARTMENT GIVES YOU 

1. All the latest news and gossip 
about popular music and musicians. 

2. The exact size and personnel of 
famous jazz orchestras. 

3. Inside facts about signature songs 
and theme songs. 

4. Where your favorite radio orches- 
tras are playing each month. 

5. A chance to get your own ques- 
tions about popular songs and 
bands answered. 



39 



BEAUTY 

Christmas Shopping With Kate Smith 




ily a few of the gifts Kate 
Smith, left, will give away this Xmas. For 
Kate Smith's program sponsored by the 
A.& P., turn to page 51 — 7 o'clock column. 



WHAT more exciting present in 
all the world could one give than 
beauty? Not just beauty in it- 
self — lovely colors and textures and de- 
signs — but the possibility of being beau- 
tiful. Let's give beauty this Christmas! 

Kate Smith and 1 went shopping to- 
gether, looking over all the loveliness that 
is for sale this season, and came back 
with our arms full of packages and our 
hearts full of the joy of gift-buying. 

"I love to give things to people," Kate 
said glowingly. "I don't much care 
whether or not I get anything in return. 
Oh, of course, I'd be hurt if certain people 
forget me on important occasions, but I do 
get so much more fun out of choosing pres- 
ents for other people and surprising them! 

"Just before Christmas, I ask my 
mother and my sister and my closest 
friends and relatives for a list of all the 
things they want most. Then I try to find 
out how much of this the rest of the 
family is getting them, so that I can fill 
in every other item myself. And I usually 
plan on something extra as a surprise, 
something they had no ide*a of getting." 

That's where the perfumes and bath 
sets and all these little feminine frills that 
we're going to tell you about this month 
come in — those extra surprises that thrill 
the feminine heart (though we have some 
very nice suggestions for the men, too!). 

Kate told me a lot about the principles 
of her gift-giving. A great deal of thought 
and care goes into every present she 
chooses, no matter how tiny or how rela- 
tively unimportant. "My sister has a new 
home," she confided, "and I like to get her 
the little things to use around the house 
which she might never buy for herself. 
Granddad is a gentleman farmer down in 
Maryland, and I'm always looking for an- 
tiques for his lovely old farmhouse. My 
mother loves garden flowers and perfumes 
that remind her of them, so I'm constantly 
on the lookout for new fragrances to 
please her." 

We saw — and smelled! — some lovely 
and attractively packaged perfumes, new 
and old, on our shopping tour. Some of 
these are illustrated on the opening page 
of this article. That flower-embossed 
I.alique globe, (Continued on page 71) 




JOYCE 



By 
ANDERSON 




By 
MRS. MARGARET SIMPSON 




COOKING 

WITH GADGETS 



SINCh the radio stars at this time of year are all bus\ 
with their pet recipes for stuffing turkey and making 
plum puddings — and I know you all know all about 
those— it seemed a good time to canvass the department 
and dime stores to see what's new in kitchen gadgets Foi 
last minute presents for your kitchen-minded friends, and 
for yourself, too— there'll be some that you will have to 
buy in duplicate in order to keep one at home. 

The gadget makers have been unusually busy this last 
year, turning out slicers, choppers, spoons and mixers by 
the carload, each one more fascinating than the last 
There's the wooden mixing spoon illustrated, for instance, 
which comes to a point and helps you scrape the kettle 
clean. Another wooden spoon is wrapped with copper wire 
just where the handle rests on the edge of a hot preserving 
kettle, doing away with that burned spot that so many of 
them acquire. There are sets of four and five wooden 
spoons marked for teaspoon and tablespoon measuring, and 
our old friends the four composition spoons, linked together 
on a ring, now come in yellow, orange and other fascinating 
colors as well as the traditional kitchen hues of green, red 
and ivory, so that you will be able to match any friend's 
kitchen. One of the most useful is the monel metal spoon, 
stainless, with various colored handles, with bowl marked 
in teaspoon and tablespoon measurements, and notched on 
both sides for pouring liquid drop by drop. 

If you have ever envied the deftness with which a 
waiter manipulates a fork and spoon with one hand, now 
is the time to bolster up your self-confidence, by using the 
serving tongs illustrated. It — or they — is made of chrom- 
ium, which means polishing difficulties are over, one side a 
spoon, the other a spoon with notched edge. A second model 
has bone handles, and a wooden fork and spoon, for salad. 
are joined by a tiny ivory pin. And while we're on the sub- 
jects of tongs, don't forget the strictly utilitarian ones foi 
coralling that last elusive baked potato from the back of 
the oven, and for many other purposes. A set of four, as- 
sorted sizes, will prevent burned fingers. 

Slicers, choppers and the like have gone in for more 
elaboration. Many of you no doubt have the thin bladed 
notched knife with the extra strip of 
metal which insures thin slices, but the 
one illustrated manufactures four such 
slices and is excellent for lemons, to- 
matoes, cooked vegetables and hard 
cooked eggs. A chopping knife has a 
sharp bladed slot at the side for slic- 
ing, another cuts potatoes into strips 
for French frying with half the usual 
bother. One of the most fascinating 
and I don't see why the Sisters of 
the Skillet didn't mention it last 
month, is a left-handed apple corer 
and vegetable parer. Honest! Its 
the regulation one made in reverse 
for use by south-paws. Another 
slicer not to be overlooked if you 
have a large sized, bread-and-but- 
ter eating family, is made in the 
size of a quarter pound of print 
butter and promises to turn out 
neat slabs of butter for table use 
(Continued on page 75) 

41 









■ 



Above, the entire cast of the National Barn Dance greet you from the stage of 
the Eighth Street Theater — the Hayloft to thousands of radio admirers — where 
they present weekly their popular "program" of old-fashioned music. Right, Joe 
Kelly, the master of ceremonies who runs the two shows, is known as "Jolly Joe." 



4 



► 



FIVE years ago there was a forgotten theater on South 
Wabash Avenue in Chicago. Dark, dusty — a mori- 
bund house. Occasionally some one would rent it for 
a benefit or amateur performance, but you just couldn't 
pack 'em in at the Eighth Street Theater. There was a 
"hex" on it. 

But now . . . Drop around any Saturday night and watch 
the crowds standing in line. Listen to the applause, the 
extravagant praise as people mill about outside after the 
show, and you'll know the "hex" has been buried. 

There is no colossal ballyhoo or fanfare of advertising 
for the show that's playing there. There isn't even a barker 
outside yelling, "Hurry, hurry, hurry!" And for that 
matter, there is no hurry. 

If you can't catch the first performance, at 7:30 (adults, 
55c, young 'uns 35c), you can make the 10:00 one. It will 
cost you 20c more if you're an adult, but pshaw, what's 
20c compared to seeing Lulu Belle in person? And if you 
can't get in this year you can next — or five years from now. 
A show that has had a successful run for nigh onto twelve 
years isn't apt to fold that soon. 

It's no "East Lynn" or "Abie's Irish Rose" but a plain 
radio broadcast which has turned the old Eighth Street 
Theater into a hey-hayloft and a moneymaker— the Na- 
tional Barn Dance, NBC's Saturday night broadcast, which 
started its job of rejuvenation just five years ago in March. 

How can a mere radio program be so universally loved 
that its audience not only keeps on listening, but continues 
to pay to see it? The amazing popularity of the Barn 

42 



Dance is the result of 
the continued use of 
a dependable formula. 

A formula so good nobody dares try to improve on it, any 
more than you would dare add a single ingredient to that 
famous gingerbread recipe which has been handed down 
from generation to generation in your family. A formula 
as old as the hills from which its homely songs have de- 
scended, as down-to-earth as a roller towel and as tradi- 
tional as a covered wagon. 

The air is not the sole use for which this particular recipe 
has been tried and found true. It's a great vaudeville stunt. 
Four or five WLS units are on the road constantly, shaking 
down crowds and shekels. And now, the newest use for 
the formula: the Barn Dance will soon be made into a 
feature motion picture. By the time you read this you 
may be seeing the Sodbusters, Tunetwisters and Hilltoppers 
on your neighborhood screen. 

But that's still not all. The Barn Dance is rapidly be- 
coming a sort of national pastime. WLS has known for a 
long time that folks in many communities get together 
Saturday nights to dial the program and do some hey- 
haymaking on their own. Now the station has put this 
custom to work for the benefit of both the amateur per- 
formers and themselves, sending out experienced directors 
to stage local Barn Dance shows with rural talent. The 
proceeds go to schools, clubs, charities, and a small cut 
to WLS to defray expenses.